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Full text of "A history of the Protestant "reformation" in England and Ireland; showing how that event has impoverished and degraded the main body of the people in those countries. In a series of letters addressed to all sensible and just Englishmen"

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PROTESTANT REFORMATION, 

PART SECOND; 



Containing aList of the Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, 
and other Religious Foundations, in England and Wales., 
and in Ireland, confiscated, seized on, or alienated, by tke 
Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments. 



WXZ.X.XAM CO3BETT, 



LONDON: 

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY WILLIAM COBBETT. 183, FLEEF- 
STREET. 



1827. 



[ENTERED AT STATIONERS HALL.] 



INTRODUCTION. 



1. THE foregoing PART of this Work contains the His 
tory of the Protestant " Reformation/ the object of which 
was to show, and, I trust, it has shown most clearly, that 
that event " has impoverished and degraded the main body 
of the people." In speaking of the motives to the produc 
ing of the event, I said, that a fair and honest inquiry- 
would teach us, that the chief of those motives was PLUN 
DER. The inquiry was fair and honest, and it has taught 
to every reader, that plunder was the main object, and, 
indeed, the only object, with all the most active, and the 
most powerful, of the actors in that drama of devastation. 
The chief object of the present little volume is to show, as 
far as my means will enable me, the enormous extent and 
amount of that plunder. 

2. To this end I here present to the reader the LIST, 
which is described in the title-page, but which stands in 
need of those short explanations which I am now about to 
give ; and, when I have given which, I shall add some ob 
servations, which, while they are suggested by bare justice 
to our well-fed and well-clad Catholic forefathers, are, as 



INTRODUCTION. 

the reader will see, imperiously demanded at my hands by 
mercy to ourselves, their unfortunate, half- famished, ragged, 
pauperized descendants. 

3. The EXPLANATIONS, to which I have alluded in the 
last paragraph, relate chiefly to the arrangement of the 
several articles in the LIST. The order is Alphabetical 
throughout, except that WALES follows ENGLAND, leaving 
IRELAND to come last. The List, for England, begins, of 
course, with Bedfordshire, and ends with Yorkshire* 
Then, under the name of each county, the order is alpha 
betical again ; the List for Bedfordshire, for instance, be 
ginning with Bedford, and ending with Woburn. 

4. In each article I have given, as far as my materials 
would enable me, 1. a description of the nature of the 
foundation ; 2. the name of the founder ; 3. the date of the 
foundation; 4. the estimated yearly value at the time of 
ihe confiscation by Henry VIII. ; 5. the present yearly va 
lue, according to the change in the value of money ; 6. by 
what king, or queen, the property was granted away ; 7. to 
whom it was granted. I will here give a specimen in the^ 
article just mentioned. " At WOE URN. A Cistercian 
"Abbey, founded near this place, in the year 1145, by 
"Hugh de Bolebec. Valued at 430J. 13s. 11-Jrf., now 
" worth 8,613Z. 19s. 2d. Granted, 1 Edward VI." to John 
" Lord Russell." 

5. Alas! when theRussells were hunting the poor Catho 
lics about, in the reign of Charles II., I wonder whether 
they ever thought of pious and generous Hugh de Bolebec ! 
Bishop TANNER tells us, that this grant was made to 
Russell in the first year of Edward VI. ; Doctor HEYLIN 
tells us that the people of Devonshire rose, in the second 
year of Edward VI., and, amongst other things, demanded 



INTRODUCTION . 

that some of the monasteries should be re-established; 
and HUME tells us, that they were, at last, quelled, and 
punished by martial law, by LORD RUSSELL, aided by 
German Troops ! /Mas! and poor Hugh de Bolebec never 
thought of all the while, I would almost be sworn ! 

6. The whole of the articles are not so perfect in their 
information as is the one above cited. In some the name 
of the grantee has not been to be come at ; in others the va 
luation is not recorded ; in others the name of the founder 
is wanting ; and, with regard to Ireland, the information is 
still more scanty, and that, too, in every respect, and in 
a very great degree. Nevertheless the LIST, taken alto 
gether, is, I trust it will be thought, a very interesting his 
torical and statistical document, and will be found very com 
modious as a work of reference ; for, if you see, or hear of, 
any ancient foundation, in any part of the kingdom, and 
wish to know what it was, and when it arose, how it was 
put down, and who got it; knowing in what county it is, 
you turn to the county, which you will find in the order of the 
alphabet. Then, knowing in or near what city, town, or 
village it is, you turn, according to the alphabet, to the city, 
town, or village ; or, to the usual name of the Abbey, 
Priory, or other foundation. Thus you, with as little in 
convenience as possible, get at the best information that I 
have been able to give. 

7. But, it is in the mass, it is as the ground of a general 
conclusion, that the contents of this volume are of the 
greatest importance. Here are about two hundred pages of 
close print filled with a bare list of pieces of once public 
property, now worth from one hundred pounds to upwardvS 
of fifty thousand pounds a year each / Some few of the 
things in the List, as in the cases of several of the Colleges, 



INTRODUCTION. 

Chapters, Hospitals, and other foundations, still continue 
to be public property ; but, these form but a comparatively 
.small part of the general mass; and there is, after all 
wholly left out of the List, the numerous private estates, 
seized on and granted away by the " Reformation " sove 
reigns, in virtue of acts of attainder and other means, 
grounded on the adherence of the owners to the religion of 
their fathers. As, for instance, estates like that of which 
CowDiiY-HousE,in Sussex, was the chief seat, and which 
\vas seized on by Henry VII., in virtue of the attainder of 
the Countess of Salisbury and her heirs, and granted by him 
to his physician, Sir ANTHONY BROWN, who obtained, 
irom that execrable tyrant, manors and estates running over 
a considerable part of the north-west of Sussex and of the 
south-west of Surrey. 

8. Besides the public property described in this List, 
there were the tithes, which were thus seized on and grant 
ed away to lay persons by the Protestant " Reformation " 
sovereigns. Until that event took place, no man had an 
idea, that it could be possible for tithes to be claimed by 
any but those who administered religion. But, it was soon 
found, that a large part of those tithes, the sole objects of 
which were the promotion of religion, and the relief of the 
poor and the stranger, had, all at once, by a mere touch of 
the Protestant Wand, been converted into estates for the 
already nobles and rich men. Such they continue to this 
day ; and, hence those monstrous things, called lay-impro- 
priations, giving, in many cases, thousands of pounds a 
year to a layman, who never sees the parish, and a few 
pounds a year to a clergyman who does whatever clerical 
duty is done in that same parish. The whole affair was a 
real tailing away from the middle and lower class, and a 
giving to the nobles and the rich. Yet are there men so 



INTRODUCTION. 

blind, or so perverse, as to think, or to pretend to think, 
that the thing, called the " Reformation," ought to be looked 
upon as " a blessing " ! 

9. The whole of the rents of the estates of the Church, 
including those tithes which were confiscated and transferred 
to lay-parsons, amounted to, perhaps, a third part of the 
whole rental of the kingdom. There are no means of 
knowing what the amount really was ; for the valuation 
was, in fact, no valuation at all. It was all plundering . 
with one hand and squandering with the other, as may well 
be imagined, when the historians tell us, that OLD HARRY 
(the name which the English gave to the Devil for many 
years after Old Harry s death, and the name which the 
Americans give to the Devil to this day); when historians 
tell us that OLD HARRY gave a church-estate to a woman, 
who had made a pudding to please him, and that Sir 
MILES PARTRIDGE won a ring of church bells of him 
at dice ! It is impossible to come at any thing like an exact 
account of the worth of tho possessions of the Catholic 
Church. Protestant writers have endeavoured to make 
the Churches rental as great as possible, in order to 
exhibit the clergy as monstrous devourers of the national 
income. According to the recorded valuations, the rental 
did not amount to more than a tenth part of the rental of 
the kingdom. But, then, these valuations were founded, 
apparently, solely upon the reserved rents, leaving out fines, 
renewals, heriots, deodands and various other sources of 
income ; and, therefore, I agree with those historians, who 
think that the Church income, including the impropriated 
tithes, amounted to a full third -part of the income of all the 
landowners (clergy included) in the whole nation. 

10. Well, then, the good and thoughtless Protestant, who 
has been, as I was, duped from infancy to manhood ; well, 



INTRODUCTION. 

then, such good Protestant will ask: " Was not this a great 
4 * deal too much to be devoured by a parcel of lazy monks 
" and priests and nuns, who did no work of any kind, who 
" lived but to eat and drink and sleep, and who kept the 
" people in ignorance ? " Now, my good brother Protestant, be 
you who you may, you cannot be more zealous or more loud 
upon this score than I was, for many years of my life ; until 
I, at last, examined for myself, not the pages of lying, 
lured, place-hunting, pension-hunting, benefice-seeking, or 
romancing, historians ; but the pages of the Statute-Book and 
of the books of the ancient laws of my country. This being 
Ae case, you are entitled to a patient hearing and a kind 
answer, from me, to this, your very natural question; a 
question such as I should, about ten years ago, have been 
Tery likely to put myself. 

11. Now, then, if the monks and priests and nuns were 
tsuch lazy people ; if they worked neither by hand or head ; 
if they did nothing but eat, drink and sleep ; if this were 
their real character, and this tho habit of their lives, how 
can you possibly believe, that they had any influence at all 
over the minds of the people? And, unless they had very 
great influence over their minds, how can you possibly be- 
JSieve, that they kept the people in ignorance ? What, my 
friend! Were the people susceptible of knowledge ? Had 
ihey (just as we have) nature s works and laws to enlighten 
them ? Had they a desire to become skilful and learned ? 
And, were they kept in a state of ignorance, were their ca 
pacities benumbed and their propensities thus completely 
thwarted by lazy creatures who lived only to eat, drink 
and sleep ? 

12 V By this time, you, I am sure, begin to be ashamed of 
these assertions; and, the further I go the more fully will 
you be convinced, that you have been and are, as I formerly 



INTRODUCTION. 

was, the dupe of those, who now live upon the spoils of the 
Church of our fathers. Now, then, is it a, fact, is it true, 
that the Catholic clergy kept, or endeavoured to keep, the 
people in IGNORANCE ? This is a charge that fat and 
luxurious fellows of the present day are incessantly preferring 
against them ; but, is it not a false charge ? That it is a 
false charge you will find proved in the most satisfactory 
manner, in the first PART of this work, in paragraphs from 
28 to 36, and in paragraphs from 1*29 to 134. But, my 
friend, look into the present volume. Turn over, zealous 
hater of " monkish ignorance"; turn over to the county of 
Oxford ; then go on to Oxford city. Aye ! there it is, in 
that " learned University", the colleges of which are all 
filled with rosy-gilled and most doctor-like Protestants, and 
the walls of which colleges incessantly ring with abuse 
poured forth on the Catholic religion, and especially on the 
clergy of that Church, who are here, above all the places 
in the world, accused of keeping the people in ignorance; 
there it is, surely, that you will, my good Protestant friend, 
find something in the way of proof to make good this ac 
cusation ! Turn over the leaves, then, and come to the 
word " OXFORD. " 

13. What! Aye, do! Rub your eyes bright, and then 
look again. What ! nothing at all ! Oh ! everlasting shame 
on the name of Protestant ! Not one single college, hall, 
or school, founded by Protestaots, nor sines the day that the 
word Protestant was pronounced in England ! About twenty 
colleges in all, and all founded and endowed by Catholics ; 
and, as if to put the calumniators of the Catholic clergy to 
shame eternal, as if to make them undergo a sort of hell in 
this world, out of the twenty, eleven were founded by CA 
THOLIC BISHOPS; two by MONKS; one by NUNS; and 
jive by Catholic kings, nobles, gentlemen, and ladies. Aye, 
and here is the record, that the University itself was founded 

a5 



INTRODUCTION. 

I 

by ALFRED, whose father took him to Rome, where he was 
anointed by the Pope himself! Nay, as if all this were 
not enough, here is the record, that the teaching at this 
University was begun by a monk, who came to England for 
the .express purpose, and in gratitude for the services of 
whom Alfred founded and endowed a monastery for him at 
Winchester. 

14. Thus, then, my gocd and true Protestant friend, we 
have, I think, settled the question about keeping the people 
in ignorance. We now come to the other assertion which 
is put forth by you, namely, that this full third part of the 
icnts of the nation " was a great deal too much to be de 
voured by the monks and priests and nuns" and which 
you have, as I used to do, repeated out of the books of the 
ically devouring vermin of the present day. Yes, it was " a 
great deal too much to be so devoured"; but, then, my 

jiend, you are not yet aware, that your basis is an assumed 
- act ; and that this assumed fact is a most monstrous lie! 
In the first place it was physically impossible that they should 
devour a fiftieth part of it. How, for instance, were the 
fourteen monks in the Abbey of Chertsey, in Surrey, to de 
vour rents, which, in cur money, amounted to 14,893/. a 
\ear ? BISHOP TANNER (a Protestant bishop, mind), says, 
hat " all the monasteries were, in effect, great schools and 
" great hospitals (meaiirg, in those days, places of hos- 
* " pitality); and were, n any of them, obliged to relieve 
t many poor people every day. They were likewise houses 
* of entertainment for almost all travellers. In short, thek 
** hospitality was such, tl at, in the Priory of Norwich, owe 
* thousand Jive hundred quarters of malt, and above 
" eight hundred quarters of wheat, and all other things 
* f in proportion, wei e generally spen t every year" 

15. There! my good duped Protestant friend; that is 



INTRODUCTION. 

the way, in which monks and nuns " devoured" their rents ! 
There were but 22 monks in this Priory ; so that, in fact, 
they were the mere agents for distributing amongst the 
needy and the strangers the rents of their estates. Ah ! 
Good God ! what has the thing called the " Reformation" 
produced at Norwich ! Who is there at Norwich NOW to 
.keep hospitality? " St. ANDREW S HALL," as it is now 
called, which was the church of this Priory, is the Corn- 
Market, and now hears, instead of the chantings of its be 
nevolent monks, the chafferings and the cheapenings, the 
lying and roguish cant, of sly Quaker corn-monopolizers. 
The questions here now are, not how and when malt and 
wheat shall be distributed to the poor and the stranger ; but, 
how they shall be hoarded up, made dear, and kept from 
the thirsty and the hungry. It was from the platform, on 
which once stood the high-altar of this Priory, that I ten 
dered to the people of Norfolk, that Petition, which they 
did me the honour to pass, which was afterwards presented 
to the Parliament, which now lies on the table of the House 
of Commons, and which is, I trust, destined finally to be 
the ground- work of measures, calculated, not, certainly, to 
restore to us the happiness enjoyed by our Catholic fathers, 
but to take away by law, and to give back to the poor, a 
part, at least, of those Church-revenues, which, in Catholic 
times, were deemed to be, and actually were, the inheritance 
of the poor and the stranger ; for, this is the grand thing 
for which that Petition prays; and, certainly, if the spot 
from which it sprang could be supposed capable of giving it 
any degree of effect, one more appropriate than the altar- 
base of this munificent Priory could not have been chosen. 

16. Yes, my good and duped Protestant friend, " a great 
deal too much to be devoured by monks and priests and 
nuns" ; and, accordingly, the monks and nuns did not, as you 
have seen, devour it, nor hardly any part of it. And now, 



INTRODUCTION. 

as to the priests, including the bishops. They could not 
marry; they could have no wives; they had, in fact, no 
families to provide for ; while, as to the monks and nuns, 
fthey could possess no private property, could leave nothing 
by will, and, therefore, were completely trustees for the poor 
and the stranger. Of the manner, in which the bishops 
spent their incomes, we have a specimen in the eleven Col 
leges, out of twenty, founded and endowed by them at Ox 
ford. But the main thing of all is, that the Catholic priest- 
Jhood, taken all together, wholly maintained the poor and 
the stranger, and suffered not the name of pauper to be 
known in England ; and, it never was known in England, 
antil the thing, called the " Reformation/ came. 

17. This is a matter, which is, at this time (July, 1827) 
&f infinite importance. In the Norfolk Petition, before 
mentioned, we prayed, that if a part of the public property, 
commonly called Church property ," might be taken away 
iiy laiv, and applied to other public purposes, My anxious 
wish, and my hope is, that the prayer of this petition may 
finally be granted by the Parliament ; whether before the 
Parliament be reformed, I cannot say; but, granted it will 
be, in the end, I have no doubt ; and, with this in my mind 
at is, that I put forth this little volume, the utility of which, 
in the case thus hoped for, we shall presently see. But, first 
we ought to consider a little the origin of this " Church 
property," as it is now called, and as it never was called, and 
as no one ever presumed to call it, until it had the name 
given it by Protestant priests and bishops, when they once 
got it into their hands. It was, in fact, the portion of the 
poor, the infirm, the aged, the widow, the orphan, the 
stranger, and of all the necessitous, which portion was lodged 
in the hands of the clergy for just and wise distribution. 

18. In the first PART of this Work, in paragraphs from 



INTRODUCTION. 

49 to 59 inclusive, this matter is fully and clearly stated. 
To those paragraphs I beg to refer the reader. There it is 
clearly shown, that tithes, and every other species of income 
of the clergy, were looked upon, and were, in fact and in 
practice,, more the property of the poor than of the monks, 
nuns, priests, and bishops. Thus it was that there were, in 
this then happy country, neither paupers nor common beg 
gars. But, when a part of the tithes and estates had been 
seized and taken away from the clergy altogether, and when 
the remainder had been given to bishops and priests, who 
were allowed to marry, and who, of course, had families of 
their own to feed and clothe and to get fortunes for, the beg 
gars, as we have seen in PART FIRST, paragraphs 470 and 
471, began to appear, and they soon " covered the land," as 
^the lice did the land of Egypt. Attempts were, as we have 
there seen, made to keep down their numbers by punishments 
the most horrible ; so that England, which had never before 
known what poverty was, now saw it in all its most hideous 
forms. 

19. At last, when the butchering and racking Elizabeth 
had tried whipping, scourging, and even martial law, in 
vain, and when she and the principal plunderers began to fear, 
that raging hunger would, if not, by some means or other, as 
suaged, deal them deadly blows; then, and not till then, the 
POOR-LAWS were passed ; and this fruit of the famous 
" Reformation" sticks to the landowners, clings fast to them, 
unto the present day. -The real history of the poor-rates and 
of English pauperism is given Part I., paragraphs from 227 
to 237 ; and in paragraphs from 4,56 to 477. And, we are 
always to bear in mind, that the money, or food, or clothing, 
proceeding from the poor-rates, is the poor s property. It 
is not alms ; it is what they have a right to by the law of 
nature, by the law of God, and by the common law of the 
land] aye, that same law, which, and which alone, gives a 



INTRODUCTION. 

man a right to the enjoyment of his field or his garden, also 
gives the poor and necessitous a right to be relieved out of the 
fruits of the earth. 

20. Civil society it was that caused that which is called 
private property. In a state of nature, when man was 
and the lands were as God made them and left them, the 
lands were for the common use of all the people. When the 
people of any country agreed to give up their common right, 
and to permit private ownership to exist, they must have 
done it with a view to make their lives safer and happier ; 
and, therefore, it is impossible ; it is absolutely impossible, 
that they could have contemplated, as a consequence of 
their social compact, that the lives of the millions would 
ever be placed at the mere mercy of the thousands, or, per-, 
haps, of the hundreds. MALTHUS denies the right of the 
poor to relief; he denies that they have any right to claim 
relief from those who hold the lands and houses as their 
private property ; and he actually recommends to the Parlia 
ment to be so foolish as well as so unjust and cruel as to 
pass a law to refuse relief to all who shall be born after a 
certain day, and also to all the parents of such per sons. In 
the way of justification of this horrid proposal, he says, 
that the man wanting relief after this, " should be left to 
the punishment of nature" ; that he should be told, that 
the " laws of nature had doomed him and his family to 
starve " ; and that, whatever might be their state of distress, 
" they had no claim on society for the smallest portion of 
food " ! I need hardly say, that this came from the pen of 
a Church of England Parson ! Arrogant, insolent, stupid, 
and cruel as it is, its source will be a question of doubt with 
few men. 

21. To the " punishment of nature" this stupid and 
cruel projector would leave the necessitous. Well, Parson 



INTRODUCTION. 

the poor would, I dare say, take you at your word, and 
jump for joy to be thus referred to< the laws of nature. 
Those laws, Parson, bid them, when they want food, to 
take it where they can find it, and to care nothing about the 
place or the person that they take it from. The laws of na 
ture know nothing about theft or robbery or burglary. 
When, indeed, in no shop, house, barn, mill, or other place, 
the hungry man can discover food sufficient to satisfy his 
hunger ; or, when finding it, he has not, whether by force of 
arms or otherwise, the ability to get at it and eat it ; then, 
indeed, I allow, that " the laws of nature have doomed 
him to starve "; but, Parson, it is only when he cannot dis 
cover the existence of the food, or when, knowing where it 
is, he has not force to seize it, that the " laws of nature 
doom him to starve." 

22. We very well know, that all men are subject, and 
ought to be subject, as I have, on more than one occasion, 
before stated, to be called forth, to be compelled to come 
forth, and, at the risk of their lives, defend their country 
against a foreign enemy, and also to defend the lands or 
houses, which are the private property of the possessors, in 
( case of any illegal attempt to take aw r ay, or to injure, those 
lands or houses. Now, suppose the country invaded, or 
suppose a band of rebels to be gutting, or pulling down, the 
house of a Lord. Suppose PARSON MALTHUS to go to a 
poor man, to whom he has before been preaching his doc 
trine ; and suppose him to call upon this man to come forth, 
as a militia-man, to repel the invaders, or to quell the rebels. 

PARSON. Here, CHOPSTICK! Come away, and bring 
your arms to defend your country. 

CHOPSTICK. My country, Parson; how is it mine, if 
I have not in it even a security against being starved to 
death while the land abounds in food ? 



INTRODUCTION. 

PARSON. But, here is the law, and forth you must come, 
or be punished severely. 

CHOPSTICK. Law! Why, the law of nature bids me, 
first, not to risk my life ; next, it bids me stay at home in 
these times of peril, to quiet the alarms of, and to protect, 
my wife and children. 

PARSON. But, here are a parcel of rebels, gutting and 
pulling down the good Lord Rottenborough s house. 

CHOPSTICK. Well! Let him drive them away. 

PARSON. But, he cannot; he is not able; one man 
cannot fight with a thousand ; and the law commands us to 
come forth to the protection of each other. 

N 

[Enter OVERSEER.] 

CHOPSTICK. Law ! Oh, no ! Parson, the law of na 
ture bids the strong to do what they please with that which 
the weak have got; that law bids these strong poor men to 
go and take the goods and to pull down and divide amongst 
them the big house of this rich weak man; and, if I be to 
be referred to that law, when I and my wife and children 
are starving for want of relief; if the Overseer be to answer 
my application by telling me, " that the law of nature has 
doomed us to starve," surely I may refer my Lord to the 
sentences of the same law. 

OVERSEER. Why, John, who has been filling thy head 
with this nonsense ? When did I talk to you about the law 
of nature ? Are there not the poor-laws to provide for you. 
in case of distress ; and do you not, in this way, partake in 
the yearly rents, and,. in fact, in the ownership, of my Lord s 
estate? [Exit PARSON, slipping off . ] 

CHOPSTICK. Aye ! That s another man s matter, Mas 
ter Pinchum ! Then, indeed, if I be a sort of a part-owner 
with my Lord, it is just that I should [taking a club down 



INTRODUCTION^ 

from the rack ] go and fight for the protection of his goods 
and his house ; and here I go to do my best against these 
rebels. 

23. This is the true, the common-sense, view of the mat 
ter. Agreeably to these principles there are, and always 
have been, in all countries, except in ill-fated Ireland since 
the " Reformation," a legal provision, of some sort or other, 
for the necessitous ; a law, of some sort, that effectually pro 
vided, that they should not die for want of food and rai 
ment ; and, though, in England, many attempts have been 
made, by STURGES and others, to alter the law in such a 
way as to make it more and more difficult for the indigent 
to obtain relief; though attempts of this sort are continually 
making ; they never can, upon the whole, be attended with 
success ; for, before they could obtain that success, the king 
dom would be convulsed to its centre ; and, indeed, it is 
clear to every man of sense and reflection, that it is the poor- 
rates, and the poor-rates alone, which, at this very moment, 
cause the peace of the country to be preserved. 

24. But, though these rates are just and necessary, we 
are never to forget, that they were not at all necessary, that 
they never existed, and that the hateful name of pauper 
never was known in England, until that " Reformation," as 
it is called, which caused the enormous confiscations, the 
particulars of which are stated in this second Part of my 
History. Before that time, the indigent were relieved out 
of the produce of the tithes, out of the revenues of the mo 
nasteries, and out of those of the manors and other estates of 
the bishops. We have seen, in the first Part of this work, 
how a large part of the tithes and almost all the revenues of 
the monasteries were alienated from the poor and from the 
public, and in what manner they became private pro 
perty. As to the poor, they, after about fifty years of whip- 



INTRODUCTION. 

ping, branding, iron-collaring, shooting, and hanging, got 
a provision, such as it was, in the poor-rates : but, observe, 
the public got no compensation for what the aristocracy 
had taken from it ; and every man had now, if not a pauper 
himself, to pay poor-rates, to make up for what the aristo 
cracy had got divided amongst them! 

25. A pretty large part of the tithes and of the manors 
and the other estates belonging to the Bishops, the Cathe 
drals, and the Colleges, remained unconfiscated, arid were 
turned over to the Protestant Parsons, Bishops, Deans, Pre 
bendaries, Fellows of Colleges, and other " spiritual per 
sons " (as the law calls them) of the present " Protestant 
Church of England, as by law established." Now, it is a 
clear case, that the Parliament, which could take this pro 
perty from the clergy of one religion, and give it to those of 
another religion; the Parliament that could, in spite of 
Magna Charta and in spite of the law of the land of a thou 
sand years standing, do this, though, in doing this the Par 
liament set at nought the wills, or grants, of all the founders 
of the, numerous religious houses and establishments ; it is a 
clear case, that all those who contend, that the Parliament 
had a, right to do these things, must allow, that the Parlia 
ment has a right to dispose as it pleases of all that part of 
the Church property, which still continues to belong to the 
nation, or, in other words, which is not private property. 
The divers religious foundations were made agreeably to the 
law. If the religion was to be changed, and a new one was 
to be established, the property in the foundations ought, in 
justice, in bare justice, to have reverted to the founders, or 
to their heirs, who, in most cases, were to be found, and 
were ready to put forward their claim to it. If the religion 
were found to be bad, the property, the lands, the trees and 
the buildings, had committed no offence. Nevertheless, the 
property was all seized on by the King and Parliament. The 



INTRODUCTION. 

Parliament gave it all to the King ; and the King, and his suc 
cessors, gave the greater part of it, in return, amongst the 
members of the two Houses of Parliament, or their relations ! 
Now, if the King and Parliament had a right to deal thus 
with property, the heirs of the founders of which were ready 
to claim it, surely no one can deny, that the present King and 
Parliament have a right to apply to public purposes that 
part of this great mass of property, which, as stated above, 
continues to be the property of the public. There is, I 
venture to assert, Ho man that will deny this, and especially 
no man, who possesses, by descent or otherwise, any part of 
the Catholic Church estates; for, what title has such man 
to his estate ? What plea has he against an ejectment ? 
He has no title, he has no answer, except those which are 
furnished by thoseActs of Parliament of Henry VIII., which 
seized, and granted to the King, the estates of the Church. 
This sauce for the goose, so delicious as it long has been 
acknowledged to be, must, when the time for another repast 
shall arrive, be allowed to be sauce for the gander 5 and, of 
this sauce Norfolk- Petition would, if acted upon, give the 
nation a taste. 

26. PLUNKETT, who has now been made a lord., and 
about whom the bleaters in Ireland are, just now, making 
such a fuss., asserted, in the debate on Mr. HUME S motion 
for applying part of the clerical incomes in Ireland to other 
public purposes; this PLUN ETT asserted, in the most un 
qualified terms, that all tithes, glebes, and all sorts of pro 
perty, called Church property, wefe as sacred from the 
touch of the Parliament., that the Parliament had not more 
right to sell them, or to apply them in any way, than it 
had to sell, or otherwise dispose of, any parcel of any man s 
private property ! Indeed, Plunkett ! What, then, are 
any of those titles good for, by which men now holdjihe 
immense masses of property described in this volume? If 



INTRODUCTION. 

this King and Parliament have no right to touch that 
which belongs to the nation, could Harry VIII. and his 
Parliament have a right to seize and to alienate all these 
masses of property, great part of which were really private 
property, and had claimants, legal claimants, to demand 
them-? If this King and Parliament have no right to take 
public property, and to apply it to public purposes, cau 
those titles be worth one single straw, which rest on Acts 
of Parliament, which Acts seized on private property and 
applied it to private purposes ? I might, by comparing 
the tenure of what the Church parsons hold with the tenure 
of private property, show the gross absurdity of the doc 
trine of this Plunkett, who, I recollect, was anxious to 
check the circulation of small pamphlets, because the mass 
of the people were now become so much more enlightened 
than formerly ; I might, by the comparison just men 
tioned, show the monstrous absurdity of the doctrine of this 
Plunkett : but, 1 say, no : I say, let his doctrine stand, if 
the parsons like ; and, then, all the titles of all the holders 
of Abbey-lands, aye, and of the greater part of the Cathe 
dral and College-lands, are not worth one single pinch even 
of Scotch snuff. 

27. However, as there certainly is not a man in the 
kingdom (except some parson, perhaps), besides PLUNKETT, 
to hold a doctrine like this, we will leave PLUNKETT to have 
his hearing faculties tickled by the bleaters of Ireland, and 
will now go on to see a little how, if applied to this mass 
of " public property, commonly called Church property," 
Norfolk Petition would work. 

28. The property which remains to the nation is, I. THE 
PAROCHIAL TITHES AND GLEBES. II. THE 
BISHOPRIC REVENUES. III. THE DEAN AND 
CHAPTER REVENUES. IV. THE COLLEGE RE- 



INTRODUCTION. 

VENUES. Here is still an immense mass of property, 
and all of it, or nearly all of it, diverted from the uses to 
which it was formerly applied, and to which it was intended 
that it should always be applied. But, the questions for us 
here are, whether it be now well* applied ; and whether it 
could not be much better applied than it now is. As to 
the real amount of it, that will never be got at by the 
public, as long as it shall remain in the hands in which it 
now is. No man has ever been able to get an account laid 
before Parliament, of the amount of t his property ! Ac 
counts of every thing else can be got; but, of this no 
account can ever be come at. Some years ago, a return 
was made to Parliament, stating, the name of each living, 
the population of the parish, the size of the church, the 
state of the parsonage-house, and the annual ivorth of 
the living, IF UNDER ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY 
POUNDS ! Here was a crafty trick ! Why not state the 
annual worth, if ABOVE one hundred and fifty pounds ! 
Why this close disguise if ABOVE that mark ? Is not the 
answer ready ? To have stated the annual worth of the 
whole of the livings would have shown to this beggared 
people what an immense sum is swallowed annually by 
these comparatively few men and their families, whose 
Catholic predecessors kept all the poor, and also kept the 
churches in repair out of these same tithes. The tithes of 
England, Wales and Ireland have been estimated, by several 
writers, at eight millions a-year. The parsons affect to 
say that this is an over statement. But, when any public 
functionary hears his gains over stated, and knows that he 
is thereby placed before the public in a disadvantageous 
light, what is his remedy ? Why, to publish an exact ac 
count of what he really does receive. Aye, and this is 
what the parsons would do, to be sure, if they had it in 
their power to prove that their gains have been over-rated. 
For my part, I am convinced, that, if we include the rent 



INTRODUCTION. 

of the parsonage -houses and glebes, the compulsory offer 
ings and fees, and all the estates of the Bishops, Chapters, 
Colleges and other foundations, which, though not legally, 
nor necessarily, engrossed by the Church-parsons, are so in 
fact ; if we include the whole, I am convinced, that this 
Church- Establishment costs this " enlightened Protestant 
nation," more than TWELVE MILLIONS OF POUNDS 
STERLING A YEAR; and this, too, observe, without 
including further millions that are required to maintain the 
POLICE - Establishment and the TROOPS, which the 
public papers so frequently exhibit to us as employed in 
collecting, or in aiding and defending those who are em 
ployed in the collecting of tithes ! This " Church-property," 
as it is called, must, like the Debt, not be estimated by the 
bare amount of itself, but, there must be added to this 
amount, the cost of the army, which is required on account 
of it. If we leave this out of our estimate, we shall be as 
.far short of the true mark, as we should be if we were to, 
leave out of the estimate of the custom and excise taxes the 
amount of the salaries of the custom-house and excise 
officers ; or as if we were, in our account of the cost of 
post-chaise hire, to leave out the amount of the sums paid 
to the post-boy and the ostler. The cost, then, of this es 
tablishment is perfectly enormous : and, what is the estab 
lishment worth to the nation ? Is the " service" rendered 
by this body of persons, called thfe clergy, worth twelve or 
fifteen millions a year? Is it worth one million? Is It 
worth one pound ? Is not the name of "service " wrongly 
applied in this case ? Has not this establishment now been 
proved, by ample experience, to be injurious, rather than 
beneficial, to the country ? Ought the incomes to be applied 
to other public purposes? The stating, and shortly remark 
ing on, a few well-known facts, relating to each of the above 
four classes of " spiritual persons," taking the classes in 
the order in which they there stand, will enable us to answer 



INTRODUCTION. 

these questions; and, if we find the last of these questions 
to be answered in the affirmative; that is to say, if we 
find, that these several parcels of public property ought to 
be applied to other public purposes, there will remain for 
us to determine only on the manner and degree, in which 
it is our duty to petition the King and Parliament to cause 
the taking away, or alienation, to be made. 

29> To begin with the first class, the TITHES and 
GLEBES, or property now possessed by the common par 
sons, or parish clergy, it must always be borne in mind, 
that this property was only so much put into the hands of 
the priests for the purposes of relieving their indigent pa 
rishioners, of showing hospitality to the stranger, of keeping 
the. church in repair and keeping up its ornaments, and of 
furnishing a decent maintenance for the parish priests 
themselves. This was not only the intention of the founders 
and endowers of parish-livings ; but, it was the law of the 
land as well as the law of the church. In the First Part, 
paragraph 51, I have shown by a reference to the canon- 
law, that the poor were to have relief out of the tithes. 
And, to prove beyond all doubt, that this was the practice 
as well as the law, I need only mention an Act of the 
15th year of Richard II., which provides, that, if the living 
of the parish be in the hands of any convent, the convent 
shall always leave in the hands of their vicar, a part of the 
income sufficient for the relief of the poor. Another 
Act, enforcing this Act, was passed in the 4th year of 
Henry IV. So that it is quite clear, that the tithes, glebe, 
and all the income of every church living, were to be em 
ployed, as far as necessary, in relieving and in otherwise 
doing good to the poor and the stranger. 

30. It is not necessary to say, that the income arising from 
this class of public property has been wholly diverted from 



INTRODUCTION. 

the purposes to which it was, at first, destined, and to which 
it was, until the " Reformation," as we Protestants call 
that sad event, fairly applied. Why, therefore, should these 
parcels of property remain any longer, at any rate, in the 
hands of the present possessors? If they would, even now, 
do as the Catholic priests did ; if they would maintain the 
poor of their parishes, and would entertain and help all 
strangers in distress ; if they would repair the churches, 
keep up the ornaments (there are none left, by the bye) ; if, 
in short, they would put an end to poor-rates and church- 
rates, and keep the poor and repair the church, they might 
still keep the tithes and the glebes and parsonage houses and 
gardens. But, if they will do neither of these, what reason 
is there for their having the property ? <e They have law 
for it." Oh, aye ! And the Catholic clergy, and more 
especially the monks and nuns, had " law for it" too, and 
law a little older, at any rate, than the law that our parsons 
have for it. They have law for it till another law come to 
take this their law away ; and what reason is there, I again 
ask, for leaving the property in their possession? What 
REASON is there that another law should not come to 
take this their law away ! 

31. Most monstrously have they always been afraid of 
questions like this. Most anxious have they always been 
to keep out of sight the origin of the poor-rates. A Hamp 
shire farmer, who had read the " PROTESTANT REFORM 
ATION," told me, a few weeks ago, that, at a meeting, rela 
tive to the poor, lately held at the poor-house, in his parish, 
and at which meeting the parson presided, there was a great 
deal said about the frightful increase of, and great hardship 
inflicted by, the poor-rates, of which the parson complained 
more vehemently than any body else. He (the farmer) took 
this occasion to ask, in all simplicity, of his Reverence, 
" how there came to be such a thing as poor-rates in 



INTRODUCTION. 

<l England, and who it was that used to maintain the 
t poor in old times" " Well," said I, " and what did 1m 
say to you in answer ? " " Zay," replied he, " ha did n t 
" zay much ; but ha screwed down s brows, and, looking 
" as black as the very devil, ha zed, that tw oud be a good 
" deal better if every man wou d mind s woan business." 
This was a pincher indeed ! Our parsons know all about 
the Catholic claims to tithes ; they know all about the col 
lection of tithes; all about moduses and endowments and 
the like ; they have at their fingers ends all the history of 
the " superstitions and idolatries " of the Catholic Church : 
but ignorant as horses they appear with regard to the way in. 
which the poor were kept in Catholic times: and, I can 
tell you another thing ; namely, that whoever dares to make 
any thing public on that subject, is, if they can reach him, 
ure to feel, in some way or other, the effects of their im 
placable vengeance ; of the truth of which we have the most 
complete proof in the curious affair of Mr. RUGGLES, to 
the circumstances of which I have once before merely 
alluded, but which, injustice to myself as well as my subject, 
and, which is of still more importance, injustice to the mid 
dle and working classes of my countrymen, I must here 
fully relate. 

32. In the year 1793, DEIGHTON, bookseller, Holborn, 
published a book in two vols. octavo, with the following title : 
" The History of the Poor : their rights, duties, and the 
" laws respecting them: in a Series of Letters. By THOMAS 
f( RUGGLES, F. A. S., One of His Majesty s Justices of 
" the Peace for the Counties of Essex and Suffolk." In. 
this work, Mr. Ruggles explained the foundation of the 
right of the poor to a maintenance from the land ; he ex 
plained the principle on which the Catholic Church took 
charge of the poor ; he traced the Church-estates, including 



INTRODUCTION. 

tithes, glebes, personal tithes and all, hack to one and the 
same source; namely, CHARITY; he insisted, that gifts, 
out of which the Church-property arose, were its, not to 
bishops and priests, or to any religious order, for their own 
me, but that they were gifts IN TRUST to them forcer- 
tain purposes, one of which purposes was, the maintenance 
of the poor ; and this his doctrine he founded and upheld 
on tbe canons of the Church, on the writings of the fathers, 
on the common-law of England, and on the statute-law oi 
England. 

33. Having established his doctrine of gifts in trust, he 
proceeded to inquire, whether this doctrine ought not now 
to be acted upon ; and, he came to the conclusion, that it 
ought to be acted upon ; and that, not only the holders <>f 
what is still called Church-property, but the holders ol" 
abbey-lands also, ought, EVEN NOW, to be made to pay 
annually, towards the maintenance of the poor, a fall 
fourth, at least, of the net yearly profits of such pro 
perty, and this, observe, over and above the proportion 
that might be called for from those who held no such pro 
perty ! For, he contended, and, indeed, he proved, that the 
grants of the Parliament to Henry VIII. did not set aside, 
nor at all enfeeble, the claim of the poor to their share of 
the benefit of the gifts in trust ; and that, though the claim 
had lain DORMANT for a long while, it was BY NO 
MEANS BECOME EXTINCT. In short, he proposed 
to revive the claim, to act upon it, and to call upon all the 
holders of Church-property, whether corning from the Ca 
tholic seculars or regulars, whether now held by clerical or 
lay persons, to give up, if it should be wanted by the poor, 
a fourth part of the net profits of their estates, be the) r of 
what nature they might, for, or towards, the maintenance 
of the poor, and this, too, over and above the rates paid by 



INTRODUCTION. 

other people. He proposed, in short, that the poor should be 
maintained out of the Church-property, if a fourth of its 
income would do it, and, if it would not, he proposed , first 
to take that fourth, and then to raise in the present man 
ner, and by general assessment,, whatever might be wanted 
further. 

34. Observe, now, that it was no jacobin, no radical, no 
republican, who proposed this ; but, in the first place, a 
land-owner; in the next place, a Justice of the Peace 
in two counties ; in the next place, a most loyal gen 
tleman ; in the next place, one of the adorers of the 
" Heaven-born 1 Pitt ; and, lastly, a most zealous Protes 
tant, asserting that the Catholic Church had "rested on 
fear and superstition," and that the " Reformation," spring 
ing up at the " magic touch of Henry VIII.," gave rise to 
a system " more consonant to the principles of sober piety 
and good sense " ! A sort of " piety " and " good sense " 
that had, it seems, Mr. Ruggles, little to do with charity, 
or with an honest execution of " trusts "! However, such 
was the author of this book ; such was the maintainer of 
these doctrines. "And," the reader will exclaim, "why 
Were the doctrines not acted upon ? " Aye ! that is the 
pith of the story : that is the very thing we are going to see. 
" See !" the reader will exclaim ; u but, what answer was 
given to Mr. Ruggles ?" Alas ! reader, no answer was 
given to poor Mr. Ruggles; but he soon found himself under 
the necessity of answering himself. In short, HE PUB 
LISHED A SECOND EDITION OF HIS BOOK, 
LEFT OUT ALL HIS ABOVE-MENTIONED DOG- 
TRINES AND PROPOSALS, AND ALMOST BEG 
GED PARDON FOR HAVING PUT FORTH 
THOSE DOCTRINES AND PROPOSALS! 



35. " What !" exclaims the honest reader, " an English- 
b 2 



INTRODUCTION. 

" man do this ! an English Gentleman do such a thing as 
" this !" O, yes ! And your " Gentlemen of England," as 
that former demagogue and now creeping courtier, Sir 
Francis Burdett, calls them, have proved to the world, by a 
long series of acts, that they are, generally speaking, the 
meanest and most cowardly of all mankind. But, what was 
it, then, that this poor Thomas Ruggles, Esq., this unfor 
tunate Justice of the Peace for the counties of Essex and 
Suffolk; what was it that the poor man left out of his 
second edition ? We will now see what it was that he left 
out, what words he ate, in order to appease the wrath of 
the parsons ; for he expressly says, in the preface to his 
second edition, that " HIS PRINCIPLES AS A 
FRIEND TO THE HIERARCAY, HAD BEEN 
SOMEWHAT CALLED IN QUESTION," in conse 
quence of his attempt " to revive the claim" of the poor on 
the revenues of the clergy. Poor fellow ! That was enough 
for him! He was marked out for vengeance : he evidently 
saiv it ; and published his " second edition " in order to 
save himself, if possible. And, now let us see what it was 
that the poor, terrified " Esquire" left out. 

.-uskfo/ * JU -/ .-l,#i^4&i f - t !mi- .-; ,.iv.,L ,v..., j 
36. In the Preface to his firs t edition, he is speaking of 
the monstrous burdens on the land, especially of the poor- 
rates ; and, here he says, that, in his book, he has made an 
inquiry into the matter. " More especially," says he; and 
then he goes on in the following words ; and, mind, these 
words that I am now going to copy here, are left out in the 
second edition. The poor " Squire" re-publishes, in the 
second editio n, the Preface to the first edition ; and, at the 
end of the thirteenth paragraph of that preface he leaves 
out, he sinks, he eats the words, and every word, of the fol 
lowing passage : " more especially as to that part of the 
" case, which relates to the productiveness and application 



INTRODUCTION. 

" of those estates which were originally given to the clergy, 
" in trust for eleemosynary purposes ; but if the laity 
* were to claim from the legislature, that equity which the 
" Court of Chancery would decree on a bill filed in com- 
" mon cases, on complaint of a cestui que trust ; that the 
" trustees should fulfil those trusts, for the purposes for 
" which the estate was granted ; a cry of, * the church is 
" in danger, much more serious and distressing would arise 
throughout the land, than any attempts of the sectaries 
" have occasioned. This also requires the attention of the Mi- 
" nister ; but the pen of no individual can ever be expect- 
" ed to rouse him to action on this point ; nothing but the 
te public voice is equal to that effect ; such an equitable 
" decree of the legislature, clashing with the interests of so 
" reverend a portion of our fellow subjects." Poor Squire ! 
He was compelled to eat these words even in his Preface ! 
But we are now to see what a dreadful meal, or, rather r 
counter-vomit, he had to undergo, in the work itself. 

37. In his 27th Letter, first edition, after describing the 
origin of tithes, he speaks of the practice as to the distribu 
tion of them. The following are his words, which words 
he leaves out in the second edition. " That such was their 
" origin, is not only the true theory; but, that, in former 
" days, the practice flowed in conformity with the principle, 
" has been already proved in the instance of an applica- 
" tion from St. Augustine to Pope Gregory, with respect 
" to the distribution of tithes ; from ancient canons of the 
" church, and from other instances, where the three-fold or 
"four-fold division of the tithes was directed, as the sees 
" of the Bishops were, or were not, endowed. The writings 
" of the fathers also corroborate the proof of this theory, as 
" well as of the practice ; and the evidence of those who 
" first held thesefiduciary estates for the benefit of thepoor 



INTRODUCTION. 

" and the church, is evidence of the highest authority, and 
" establishes the most convincing proof. The statute law 
" also proceeded on this idea ; or else the legislature looked 
" on the possessions of the ecclesiastics as the property of 
" the kingdom, in the reigns of Richard II. and Henry IV." 
Yes ! the parsons of Essex and Suffolk did not like to 
hear of any " division of the tithes, or any distribution of 
them." They did not like to hear of "fiduciary estates"; 
that is to say, trust-held estates. And so the poor Squire 
found that his safest way was to swallow all this down 
again. 

38. The next is a still bigger mass for poor Squire 
Ruggles to get back down his throat. He has been, in the sen 
tences immediately preceding what I am now about to quote, 
speaking of the turbulent times (from Henry V. to Henry 
VIII., and the still more turbulent in and after this last 
reign) which caused the above-mentioned claim of the poor 
to lie dormant. Then he goes on in the words which I am just 
about to quote, and which words the poor Squire has wholly 
sunk in his second edition : " No wonder, that" [during 
the turbulent times, and after the Reformation,] " these 
" claims should have remained dormant, but, it by no 
" means follows, as a consequence, that because such rights 
" of charity as these, owing to the rough and unsettled cir- 
" cumstances of the times, were dormant, they should 
" BECOME EXTINCT, especially when so large a por- 
" tion of the revenue still remained to the Church ; the 
" possessors of which, however charitable in their DOC- 
< < TRINES, by DEGREES WITHDREW THE RIGHT- 
" FUL AND ACCUSTOMED PROPORTION OF 
"THEIR ESTATES FROM THE REPAIR OF 
" CHURCHES AND THE MAINTENANCE OF THE 
" POOR ; and although they still presided in our high 



INTRODUCTION. 

" court of conscience, and through the ensuing century 
" <*ave us chancellors, were, notwithstanding, very careful 
" how they permitted such a claim to be established over 
" the estates of the dissolved monasteries : knowing that 
" their own possessions were held by the same tenure, 
given, at first, for the same purposes, and liable to simi- 
" lar trtists" No wonder that the Squire s " principles" 
as a friend to the hierarchy, were somewhat " called in 
question." No wonder that he was compelled to swallow 
these words. 

39. Having told us, that the claims , though they had 
been dormant, were not extinguished, he proceeded to 
prove, that the right still existed in 1793, as good as it was, 
as complete as it was, in the 12th or 14th century, never 
having been weakened by any positive law. The following; 
is the passage ; most excellent it is ; and it is unnecessary 
for me to add, that it was left out of the second edition. 
" We all know, that a claim to the third or fourth part of 
" the ecclesiastic revenue for the benefit of the poor, is 
" nearly vanished in the oblivion of past times ; but a right 
"may remain, although the use of it has been long nc~ 
" glee ted. A maxim of law prevails in ecclesiastical rights, 
" indium tempits occurrit ecclcsite ; the poor are a part of 
" the Church ; the possessions of the Church are the posses- 
" sions of the poor ; the revenues have been so styled by the 
" fathers of the Church ; they were obtained in the name 
" of the poor, for the love of God: are not the poor, there- 
4< fore, permitted to claim the benefit of the same maxim? 
" Is not that the law of the part, which is the law of the 
" whole ? At least there is as much justice in the maxim 
" for the one, as for the other ; therefore, nullum tempus 
" occurrit pauperibus. If positive ordinances of the state 
" have not destroyed this right, no length of time should be 



INTRODUCTION. 

* allowed to weaken it. Let those who doubt the truth of 
4< these assertions, find, if they can, an affirmative injunc- 
* tion, that the Church should hold its revenues free and 
" clear of those trusts, for the benefit of the poor, which 
** were created by the donors, when they gave their lands 
* and tithes for eleemosynary purposes ; no such discharge 
* is to be seen in the Acts of Parliament in the 27 and 
" 3i Henry VIII., which empowered the crown to alienate 
** the possessions of the monasteries : those, therefore, who 
* are possessed of estates, which were formerly monastic, 
* i held them QUOD HOC, subject to the same equitable 
" claim." Alas ! for poor Justice Ruggles ! No wonder, 
jgood God ! that his " principles, as a friend to the hier- 
* ; archy, were somewhat called in question." However, 
here we have law, not only equity, but law also, for going 
with a demand, if we chose it, on the holders of Abbey- 
lands for a part, at least, of their revenues ! 

40. One more extract shall finish ; and, a pretty complete 
jinish it is : for, it contains nothing short of a proposition, to 
take away from all holders of what is, or what ever was, ec 
clesiastical property, a full fourth part of the net annual 
profits of such property ! Not a word, not a breath of this, 
in the Squire s second edition ! " MUM !" say the Squire; 
but I have found out the first edition ; and in that the 
Squire shall now be heard. " In any future revisal of the 
** laws, respecting the poor, their maintenance, employment, 
" and relief, it may be worth the attention of the legisla- 
" ture to call to mind for what purposes the ecclesiastical 
* revenues of the kingdom were originally granted, to in- 
mt quire whether they are employed in those purposes; 
" to investigate the fact, on what trusts and on account of 
" what duties, the clergy originally received the clerical es- 
** tate ; and to ask whether those duties and those trusts 



INTRODUCTION. 

u are now fulfilled? and when they are convinced of the pur- 
" poses for which those estates were originally granted , and can 
" find no positive law to abrogate those purposes, and per- 
" ceive that the poor stand as much in need of the perform- 
" ance of those duties, as they did when the estates were first 
" granted to the Church ; the principle on which the legis- 
" lature should proceed is manifest. I am aware of the 
l( nature of such investigations, and fully sensible that no 
" man can expect, in those whose performances of the du- 
" ties, for which they have received their estates, is chal- 
" lengedand brought to the test, a favourable audience, nor 
u expect from them a candid interpretation of the motives 
" which instigate to the inquiry ; but be that as it may ; the 
" present situation of the poor ; their wretched state ; their 
" increasing misery ; the increasing burthen upon the public 
" for their maintenance ; these warrant the inquiry ; the in- 
" quiry brings to light the evidence ; the deductions are the 
" consequence of a free and candid use of the reasoning 
" faculties ; if any error lie either in fact or argument, can- 
" dour requires an explanation from those who conceive that 
" there is the Jeast intention in the writer to mislead the 
"judgment of the public ; which explanation will be thank- 
" fully received ; as it will, nevertheless, tend to establish 
" one great object of this investigation, that is truth. As- 
" suming, therefore, the foregoing state of the matter as fact, 
" would it be a hard compromise with the possessors of 
" ecclesiastical estates, that those in the possession of lay 
tf patrons, on whom no parochial duty is incumbent, should, 
<l after a medium of the poor rates has been taken through" 
" out the kingdom for the last three years, bear the in- 
" creased expense of the maintenance of the poor alone, 
" until the rate upon their ecclesiastical estates amount 
" to one-fourth of the net annual receipt of their profits, 
" before the lay estates be further encumbered ; and that 



b5 



" the clergy should be rated in the same proportion ? **- 

Not one word of all this in the second edition ! 

, . . > 

41. These opinions, doctrines, and, especially, this last 
PROPOSITION to take away a fourth part of the re 
venues even of the lay impropriators and from the abbey- 
land holders, as well as from the parsons and bishops, 
must have obtained for, and secured to, poor Squire Ruggles 
a comfortable time of it \ This book came out just before 
high Anti- Jacobin times, when it was pretty nearly as 
much as a man s life was worth to express a doubt of the 
excellence of the Church establishment. The Church pro 
perty and all private estates in general had been confiscated, 
or nearly so, together, in France ; plunder, guillotining, 
burning of nobles houses, putting royal persons in prison, 
and, finally, to death : all these had, in France, come along 
with, in company with, a taking away of tithes. " Look 
" you there !" said our parsons : " see the dreadful conse- 
11 quences of touching tithesl If you touch tithes, you see, 
" plunder,, murder, house- burning and king- killing, and 
" atheism must follow ! They must all follow, if you touch 
" tithes." This was the cry of the parsons, throughout the 
whole of this then deluded country. Every one was called 
an enemy of GOD as well as of the King, if he but hinted a 
doubt of the wisdom of suffering this Church clergy to 
swallow up so many millions a year. In this state of things, 
the arrogance of the parsons was beyond description. They 
were as active as they were arrogant And, at a time when 
a man dared hardly speak his mind inprivate conversation, 
if his sentiments were at all hostile to the parsons, judge, 
reader, of the life that poor Justice Ruggles must have led, 
until he publicly, in a second edition, published his recanta 
tion, and in the face of the nation, did as good as do pen 
ance for his sins against Tom Cranmer s and Old Betsey s 



INTRODUCTION, 

Church, " as by law established." Judge of the life that 
he must have led, at a time, when not to bow to the earth 
before a Church parson, was to run a risk of being deemed an 
atheist and a jacobin, and when such deeming had its 
practical effects always at hand, ready for the victim. As 
to tradesmen and farmers, they dared not open their mouths 
to speak of a parson in any terms but those of positive 
praise. It was during this" reign of terror," real reign of 
terror, much more real than it ever was in France, that poor 
Squire Ruggles recanted*. It is very curious to observe the 
effect of the reign of terror in this case. The Squire wrote 
the matter of his book in 1792, and published it in a periodi 
cal work, called the * ANNALS OF AGRICULTURE." lie 
published the first edition, in the book-shape, very early in 
1 793. Now, observe, the war against France was not begun 
when thiseditionmusthavebeenz^/Aepress. Sothatthe reigu 
of terror had not commenced, and could not have been anti 
cipated, when this first edition, with all the above quoted 
passages in it, went to the pres.i from the hands of Mr. 
Ruggles. But, when the second edition went to the press, 
the reign of terror was in full swing ; the Act of Habeas 
Corpus was suspended ; and there was an Act to empower 
the Ministers to imprison, just where and when they 
pleased, any body ( Squires not excepted) THAT THEY 
MIGHT SUSPECT of treasonable practices ! No won 
der, therefore, thac Mr. RUGGLES changed his tone, re 
canted, and expunged the passages which were offensive to 
the parsons^wbo now saw plenty of barracks and German, 
troops in the country, and who, to use their own phraseology, 
aiade the " enemies of social order and our holy religion 
shake iu their shoes ! 

42. Without stopping here to congratulate my readers 
(which, had I room, I would, in the strongest and fullest 



INTRODUCTION. 

terms that our language admits of) on the change which 
thirty years of war and borrowing money have produced 
relative to the parsons ; without stopping to congratulate my 
readers on the amazing change in the minds of the people, 
relative to these same Church parsons, I now proceed again 
to ask, what reason is there that this great mass of property, 
now used solely by the clergy, should not be applied to some 
other public purpose; and, again I come (after my long but 
most useful digression relating to Mr. Ruggles) ; again I 
<-ome, to that class of property, which is in the hands of 
the common parsons, or parish clergy. This class of pro 
perty consists of several sorts, tithes, great and small, land, 
glebes, tithes in money, parsonage-houses arid gardens, com 
pulsory offerings, compulsory fees. These, like all other re 
ligious property, whether secular or regular, were made, 
granted, or established, in trust. The objects, that they 
were intended to effect, were, to make a sure provision for 
the poor, to build, repair and ornament churches, to, keep 
hospitality for the stranger, and to support unmarried 
priests, to be the personal friends, comforters, advisers, ad- 
jnonishers of all their parishioners; aid, particularly, to 
tr.achall the CHILDREN of the parish their moral and 
religious duties : and that, too, not by merely the reading 
of prayers to them and the reading of what are called ser 
mons to them from the desk, or pulpit; but by personal., in 
dividual teaching, the church being, at certain appointed 
times of very frequent occurrence, a real religious and 1 
moral school. Are these objects now effected by the means 
of these several sorts of parish-church property ? Will any 
man say, that any one of these objects is now effected by 
the parish clergy? Will any man say, that any one of 
ihese objects is now effected, or attempted to be effected, by 
means, for instance, of the 2s. 9d. in the pound, which the 
tatizcns of Lon4pn pay, 31 tit ie^ on the rack-rent of thei? 



INTRODUCTION. 

houses ? When that tithe was settled, there were no poor- 
rates, no church-rates ; and the poor and church were, of 
course, to be maintained out of this 2s. 9c?. in the pound ; 
and, as Mr. Ruggles most justly observes, there never has 
been any law passed to release the city-clergy of this claim 
on the tithes. 

43. Besides, as to the public utility of the thing, it is 
perfectly notorious, that there are now about forty different 
religions, all professing to be founded on the Bible ; it is 
equally notorious, that a very small proportion of the people, 
even in England and Wales, go to the Established Church, 
and that, in Ireland, there is not above one person out of 
seven that goes to that Church. In the Hampshire list of 
persons taking out game-certificates for 1825, there was one 
parson out of every thirteen persons ; so that, if this were 
the case generally, a thirteenth part of all the sportsmen in 
England consisted of parsons alone. It is notorious, that 
there is a very large part of the parishes, even in the 
finest counties in England, in which the parsonage-houses 
have been suffered to fail down and totally disappear ; and 
it is equally notorious, that, in more than one half of the 
parishes, there are no houses that the parsons deem Jit for 
them to live in, while, at the very same time, large, even 
enormous, sums of money have been voted out of the taxes 
for the " relief of the poor clergy of the Church of 
England." It is notorious, that, in numerous parishes, the 
churches have been suffered to tumble down, and to leave 
scarcely a trace behind, while the tithes do, nevertheless, 
continue to be most rigidly exacted by the parsons. It is 
notorious that many of the parsons have several livings; 
and that many receive the tithes for years together, without 
ever setting their eyes on the parish. It is notorious, that 
a considerable part of the parish-parsons are, at the same 



INTRODUCTION. 

time, colonels, captains, or subalterns, in the army, or navy, 
and that they continue to receive half-pay as such officers, 
though the half-pay is held, by the Government, to be a 
retaining fee for future service, and though the law 
forbids these men ever to be military or naval officers again. 
Lastly (for the enumeration would never end), it is notorious 
that a large part of these parsons are Justices of the Peace, 
and are, at the same time, rectors or vicars of several pa 
rishes each. 

44. It being manifest, then, that the revenues received 
by these persons are not applied as they formerly were, and 
that they are not applied to any beneficial public purpose, 
we must determine, that they ought to be otherwise applied ; 
that they ought to be applied to some really useful public 
purpose. To what public purpose I will speak of by-and- 
by, and also of the manner and degree of the alienation, 
or subtraction. 

45. Next coine the ENORMOUS REVENUES OF THE 
BISHOPS, several of whom have died, of late years, each 
leaving personal property to an amount exceeding two hun 
dred thousand pounds, after having lived in the style of 
princes. AVill any man say, that this ought to be, and that, 
at the same time that these men s gains and accumulations 
are thus going on, the people at large, ought to see one mil 
lion six hundred thousand pounds of the money raised on 
them, taken from them, in taxes, or out of public loans, 
voted away for the " relief of the poor clergy of this 
same Church ? " Will any man say, that this ought to be ? 
Will any man say it, let him be who or what he may ? 

46. As to the Deans and Chapters, of what use are they 
to the nation ? As far as I have ever heard, it is not even 



INTRODUCTION. 

pretended that they perform any duty, any services at all to 
the public, to either king or people : and, besides, the per 
sons who receive the revenues of the Cathedral Churches, 
have generally, if not always, a parish-living besides, at 
many miles distance, and, sometimes, two or three such 
livings ! Yet, as this SECOND PART of my work will 
show, the Chapters have immense estates. And is there a 
man on earth, except he be one who gains by the thing, 
who will say, that the nation s estates ought thus to be 
used ? Will even Sir James Graham say, that the fund- 
holder, who has lent his money to those, who, in fact, enjoy 
the greater part of these and all such like estates ; will even 
Sir James Graham say, that a farthing of interest ought to 
be deducted from the fundholder, while there is any part of 
this public property unapplied to the liquidation of the debt 
due to him ? 

47. The Colleges present us with another immense mass 
of public property, from which the parsons and the aristo 
cracy alone derive, or can, under the present regulations, 
derive any possible advantage. The estates of these Col 
leges are very great in worth, and, of course, in yearly 
amount. This amount is divided amongst parsons, who 
are the schoolmasters to the aristocracy ! As to the na~ 
tion at large, it can have no share in the benefit produced 
by these estates, seeing, that the scholars are admitted only 
on such terms as must effectually shut out all the middle 
and working classes. And, are we, then, going to back the 
men, who would strip our neighbours, the fund holders, 
while these estates remain to be used for the exclusive bene 
fit of the aristocracy and their schoolmasters ? These es 
tates, like all those which are held by the rest of the clergy, 
are public property ; as such they may be dealt with by the 
King and Parliament. It would be hypocrisy, calling for 



INTRODUCTION. 

the punishment of the cat o nine tails, to pretend that this 
great mass of public property, or, that the whole of the 
Church Establishment, all taken together, is of any use to 
the public, as it is now employed. It is a large part of the 
property of the whole country, divided amongst, and enjoyed 
exclusively, by the aristocracy. That is the real fact. 
The Bishopricks, the Parish-livings, the Deanships, the 
JStalls, the Fellowships, are, in fact, all in their gift. The 
property is, in short, the public s in right and in name, and 
the aristocracy s in possession and enjoyment. And, as to 
its being necessary for the religious instruction of the peo 
ple, that is the very thing that I have showed to be false, in 
the very first Paragraph of the first Part of this work ; to 
which I beg the reader to turn, if he have it not in his recol 
lection. In short, this is a great and enormous mass of 
public property, now enjoyed by the few ; and the time is 
apparently not far distant, when all men will be convinced 
of the necessity of applying it to purposes of a really public 
nature, or, in one word, to the liquidation of part of the 
Debt. 

48. With regard to the manner of withdrawing this pub 
lic property from the control that it is at present under, the 
means vould be an Act of Parliament, and, provided the 
provisions of the Act were effectual, the manner might be 
as mild as the parsons themselves could have demanded, 
even in " Anti-Jacobin" times, when the workings of our 
avenging friend, the DEBT, were not perceived. The de- 
yree would be a matter of more difficulty ; or, I should say, 
it would require a little more thought. There are two opi 
nions with respect to new regulations ; the one is, that there 
ought to remain no Church-establishment at all, but that 
each sect, or sort, ought to be left to provide for its own re- 
Jigious instructors. The other is, that there ought to be an 



INTRODUCTION. 

establishment upon an almost apostolical allowance. 1 am 
/or the former ; because, as long as there is an establish 
ment, making a part of the state* there must always be a 
contest going on amongst the divers sects for a preference of 
some kind or other. Before, however, we can say, what the 
degree of alienation or subtraction, ought to be, we must 
know which of these two changes would be adopted. But, 
one thing I am fixed on, and that is, that I, for my own. 
part, would never join in any petition to king or parliament, 
for any new modelling or any alienation, or subtraction, of 
these public revenues, if such petition stopped short of tak 
ing, and applying to public purposes, nine-tenths of these 
revenues, taken as a whole. 

49. If any one should be disposed to characterize such a 
deduction as harsh, I here, before-hand, beg leave to ob 
serve to him, that I have no desire to see any deduction at 
all, if the nation can continue to pay the interest of the 
Debt in full and in gold of standard weight and fine 
ness. I look upon this immense mass of public property as 
enjoyed almost exclusively by the aristocracy and its imme 
diate dependents. I do not like this ; but, for me, let it 
still be thus, if the fundholders can continue to be paid as I 
have just stated. But, is there a man in the world, who 
will not say, that every shilling s worth of public property 
ought to be applied to the payment of the Debt, before a 
thought be entertained of taking from those who have lent 
their money any portion of their right to a demand of pay 
ment? Vv e have seen, that Mr. Ruggles insists on the right, 
the legal right, of the nation, to demand, that the Abbey- 
lands, that is, that all property seized and granted away by 
the "Reformation" sovereigns and Parliaments, whether it 
consist of lay impregnations, Abbey -lands, or what not, 
though now in the hands of lay persons, and deemed private 



INTRODUCTION. 

property ; we have seen, that he, who was a land-owner, a 
Justice, and, I believe, a lawyer, insists, that apart of even 
this property could be legally, and might be justly, applied 
to the public purpose of relieving the poor. Now, as for me, 
I never wish to see proposed an^ measure that shall touch 
this description of property, which may now fairly be called 
private properly. But, is not a man s stock-certificate; 
is not that private property also ? Has he not, to a cer 
tainty, given his money for it? Therefore, though God 
forbid the necessity should arise, I have no hesitation 
in saying, that I would rather see even the lay-impro- 
priations and the abbey-lands resumed by Act of Par 
liament, than see an Act of Parliament making a great de 
duction from the property of the fundholder ; and most as 
suredly, I Avould much rather see a resumption of grants 
by the Crown of the lands and houses and mines and other 
property, which the Crown has granted away since the reign 
of Henry VIII., out of the ancient Crown estate; and, as 
we always ought to bear in mind, which granting away has 
been the cause of that continual" and copious drain, the 
Civil List. But of all the horrible things in this world, 
would not the most horrible be, to borrow 1,600,000. to 
make a present of to the parsons of the Church ; and, to 
reduce the interest of the Debt ; that is to say, to take 
away a part of the property of the fundholder, who lent the 
money thus made a present of ; to take, I say, part of his 
property away while the clergy were suffered to keep the 
1,600,000/. ! Observe, that, during the years, during all 
the years, that the Parliament was making the Church clergy 
a present of 100,OOOZ. a year, the making of loans was 
going on : so that, this 100,OOOZ. a year came out of the 
loans : it was borrowed money ; the lender is to be paid 
his- interest ; and, will any man say, that it is not most hor 
rible to think of deducting from this interest ; to think of 



INTRODUCTION. 

doing this on account of the poverty of the state, while the 
state suffers the clergy to keep this money ? 

50. The thing called QUEEN ANNE S BOUNTY is an. 
annual sum, taken from the people, to be given to the 
Church parsons, in addition to all their monstrous revenues. 
What pretty names they give to these things ! The Crown 
had, for part of its income, the tenths and first fruits of 
the clergy. QUEEN ANNE was the sovereign when this 
branch of income was granted away from the Crown, in 
order to augment the value of small livings; but, one good 
turn deserves another ; such "generosity" in the Queen 
merited a return ; but, alas ! the people had to make the 
return ; and, accordingly, they have had to pay more to the 
Civil List ever since, on account of this " Bounty " than the 
" Bounty" itself amounts to. However, here is another 
great annual sum (in addition to the tithes and all the other 
things that we have before seen) going from the pockets of 
the people into those of the clergy. 

51. Here, again, we have another effect of the Protestant 
" Reformation." Before that event there was no Civil 
List. Poor-rates, Civil List, Queen Anne s Bounty, Septen 
nial Bill, NATIONAL DEBT; all, yea all, are the fruit 
of the event, called " the Reformation"; and, though the 
rest might, or may be overcome, THE DEBT CANNOT, 
without making a change in that Protestant Church, to esta 
blish which on the ruins of the Catholic Church, the debt 
was made ! All history, though full of instances of retri 
bution, does not, I verily believe, throughout its thousands 
of volumes, furnish us with one so complete, so striking, 
and reading to mankind so tremendous a lesson as this. 
Here, at this moment, is England, famed, during fifty ages, 
for her liberties and her laws ; but, still more famed for the 



INTRODUCTION. 

happiness of her people, and the plenty in which they lived : 
here she is, and here she has been for years, avowedly in 
deep distress, engaged in contrivances for getting rid of her 
people, who are petitioning to be transported from their 
native land, in the hope of mending their miserable lot ! 
Here she is, covered with the disgrace of ten times the 
gaol-room that was formerly necessary, and with that of a 
regulation, which allots to the convicted felon in her gaols 
more and better food and raiment than to the honest 
labouring man in her woods and fields? And, what 
is the cause of this ? The DEBT is the sole cause ; 
for that renders monstrous taxes necessary; they ren 
der a great standing army necessary; so that it is the 
Debt, and that alone, which has made England the 
most degraded and miserable of countries, Ireland al 
ways excepted. And what caused the Debt? An Act 
of Parliament for the making of loans and paper-money. 
And for what were loans and paper-money made ? Why, 
the very act itself declares, that they were made for the 
purposes of waging a war, in order " to keep out Popery, 
" and to preserve the Protestant Church as by law esta- 
** blished ; " so that the Debt is an invention and institu 
tion as purely Protestant as half-pay parsons are, or as is 
the treadmill itself. And, at last, that Debt, that Protestant 
Debt, which was created for the declared, nay, the boasted, 
purpose of preserving this Church, now threatens this 
very Church with destruction; now fixes its eyes on the 
property of that Church as the first thing to fly to in case 
of necessity ; and that such necessity will and must arise, 
and is even now at hand, where is the man of sense 
who does not believe? And, where is the just man who 
will not say, that those who have lent their money for the 
waging of wars to " keep out Popery" ought not to be 
bilked of one farthing of their demand, while there is left to 



INTRODUCTION. 

the Protestant r clergy a single ear f of wheat, or a single 
blade of grass ? 

52. Here I conclude. I had, before (in the First Part)* 
given a history of the manner in which Church property 
had been dealt with heretofore. In this Second Part I give 
an account of the property, show the worth of it, and who 
has it. In this INTRODUCTION, I have endeavoured to 
show, that it is just and reasonable, that the immense mass 
which still continues to be public property, ought to be dealt 
with again, and legally applied to purposes really public; 
and, as a reward for all the labour I have bestowed, I am 
quite satisfied with the firm belief, that the day is not far 
off, when the knowledge that I have communicated, and 
when the principles that I have taught, relative to this great 
subject, will be adopted by persons in authority, and acted 

upon to their full extent t 

Here I had signed my name, and was about to put the date* 
It was on its way from my mind to my hand, when I stopped 
my hand all at once and exclaimed : " Good God ! the 
" ninth of July \ the anniversary of my sentence of two 
" years imprisonment in a felon s gaol, with a fine of a thou- 
** sand pounds to the King, and, at the end of the two 
" years, with seven years bail, myself in three thousand 
" pounds and two sureties in a thousand pounds each ; and 
" all this monstrous punishment for having expressed my 
" indignation at Englishmen having been flogged , in the 
" heart of England, under a guard of German troops ! Good 
" God!" exclaimed I again; " What! am I, on the annk 



INTRODUCTION. 

" versary of that day, which called forth the exultation of 
" the Hampshire parsons, who (though I had never com- 
ff mitted any offence, in private life, against any one of 
* them) crowed out aloud, in the fullness of their joy, Ha ! 
" he s gone for ever ! He will never trouble us any more \ 
" and who, in a spirit truly characteristic of their corps, 
" actually had, as a standing toast, ( Disgrace to the ME- 
" MORY of Cobbett. What!" exclaimed I again, " and 
" am I, on the anniversary of that very day, putting the 
" finishing hand ; yea, sending from under my fingers to 
* the press, the last, the very last words, the completing 
" words, the closing point, of a work, which does the JOB 
" for them and for all their tribe ; of the former part of 
" which work, I, myself, have sold forty thousand copies, 
" containing six hundred and forty thousand Numbers ; 
" and which work is now sold in .English, in two Stereo- 
" typed Editions in the United States of America ; which 
" work has been published in New York in Spanish, at 
" Paris in French, at. Geneva in German, and at Rome in 
* Italian ; and all this took place just about sixteen years 
* after these Hampshire parsons had taken for a standing 
" toast : * Disgrace to the MEMORY of Cobbett ! " And, 
then, feeling health and vigour in every vein and in every 
nerve ; seeing, lying before me, manuscript (equal to twenty 
pages of print) written by me this very day; knowing the 
effects, which, in the end, that manuscript must have on 
these parsons, and the great good that it must do to the 
nation ; reflecting, feeling, seeing, knowing, thus, it is, that 
I, in justice to our pious, sincere, brave, and wise fore- 



INTRODUCTION. 

lathers, and in compassion to my suffering countrymen, 
and to the children of us all, send this little volume forth 
to the world. 

WM. COBBETT. 

Kensington, 9tft July, 1827. 



LIST 

OF 

ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



BEDFORD (COUNT v). 

AT BEDFORD. An Hospital of St. Leonard s Hospitalers, 
founded in the reign of Edward IV., by a townsman, whose 
yearly revenue was 161. 6s. Sd. in 26 Henry VIII.; now 
worth 326J. I3s.4d. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded by Mabilea de Plates- 
hull, in the reign Edward II., valued yearly at 5/., now 
worth 100J.; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to John 
Gostwyke. 

At BIGGLESWADE. A Chantry; revenue 7/., now 
worth 140J. 

At BISSEMEDE. A Priory of Augustine Canons, founded 
by Hugh Beauchamp, in the reign of Henry II. ; annual re 
venue, 8 II. I3s.5d., now worth 1,623/. 95. 2d. ; granted, 
29 Henry VIII, to Sir William Gascoign. 

AtCALDWELL. An Augustine Priory, founded in the reign 
of John, by Robert of Houghton. Revenue 148/. 15s. 10c/., 
"cn worth 2,975/. 16s. 8d. ; granted, 5 Elizabeth, to 
JL uomas Leigh. 

At CHJCKSAND. A Priory of Nuns of St. Gilbert, 
founded, in the year 1150, by Pain de Beauchamp and his 
wife. Yearly value, 230 J. 3s. 4%d., now worth 4,603/. 7s. 6d. 
Granted, 31 Henry VIII., to R. Snow. 

At D UNSTABLE. A Priory of Augustine Canons, founded 
by Henry I. Yearly value 402Z. 14s. 7-|d. ; now worth 
8,054J. 12s. 6d. Granted to Sir Leonard Chamberlayne. 

At EATON. A College, or Guild. Yearly value 71. 16s. 
now worth 156J. 

At ELSTOW, An Abbey of Benedictine Nuns, founded by 
Judith, neice to the Conqueror, and wife to Waltheof, Earl 
of Huntington. Yearly value 325/. 2s. l^c?., now worth 
6,502/. 2s. 6d. Granted, 7 Edward VI., to Sir Humphrey 
Radcliff. 



LIST OF 

At FARLE. An Hospital, founded by Henry II. Granted, 
26 Henry VIII., to the Provost and Fellows of Cambridge 
College. 

At GROVESBURY. Priory of Aliens, whose possessions 
still remain. Revenue uncertain. 

At HARWOOD. A Priory of Augustine Nuns, founded, in 
the reign of Stephen, by Sampson le Forte. Yearly value 
471. 3s. 2d., now worth 943/. 3s. 4d. Granted to William 
Lord Parr, 35 Henry VIII. 

At MELCIIBURN, or MECIIELBURN. A Preceptory of 
Knights Hospitalers, with a Manor and a Church, settled 
by Lady Alice, or Adelize, de Claremonte, Countess of 
Pembroke, in the reign of Henry I. The Lands belonging 
to this Preceptory were valued at 241 1. 9s. 10o?., now worth 
4,82Z. 16s. Sd.- granted, 3 Edward VI., to John Earl of 
Bedford. 

At MERGATE, or MARKET-STREET. A Nunnery of 
Benedictine Nuns, founded in a wood, near this place, in 
the parish of Caddington, by Ralph, the Dean and Chapter 
of St. Paul s, London, in the year 1145. Valued, 26 Henry 
VIII., at 143J. 18s. 3d. ; now worth 2,878/. 5s. Granted, 
2 Edward VI., to George Ferrers. 

At NEVEHHAM, near BEDFORD. A Monastery of Au 
gustine Canons, founded in the reign of Henry II. , by Simon 
Beauchamp. Yearly revenue 343/. 15s. 5d., now worth 
6,875/. 8s. 4J. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Urian Brereton. 

At NORTIIWELL, NORTHILL, Or NoRRELL. A Col- 

legiate Church, founded, 6 Henry IV., by Sir Gerard Bray- 
broke, Knt., Thos. Pevre, Jojm Harvey, John Ward, Edm. 
Hampden, and John Hertshorne, for the souls of Sir John 
Traylly and son. Yearly value at the dissolution, 6 1Z. 5s. 5d., 
now worth 1,225/. 85. 4d.; granted, 2 Edward VI., to Wil 
liam Fitzwilliam. 

At WARDEN. An Abbey of Cistercian Monks, founded, 
in the year 1135, by Walter Espec. Yearly value 
442/. 11s*. lid., now worth 8,85R 18s. 4d. surrendered,. 
by the Abbot and fourteen Monks, December 4, 1538. 

At WOBUR.N. A Cistercian Abbey, founded near this 
place, in the year 1145, by Hugh de Bolebec. Valued at 
430J. 13s. ll|d, now worth 8,613/. 19s. 2d.; granted, 
1 Edward VI., to John Lord Russell. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



BERKS (COUNTY). 

At ABINGDON. Here was an Abbey of Benedictine 
Monks, 500 in number, in the time of the Ancient Britons, 
where Constantine the Great is said to have been educated; 
it was destroyed by the Danes, A. D. 955 ; but afterwards 
rebuilt by the Abbot Ethelwold, through the bounty of King 
Edred and King Edgar. Valued, at the dissolution, at 
2,042/. 2s. 8|c?. yearly, now worth 40,842/. 14s. 2c?.; 
granted, 1 Edw. VI. to Sir Thomas Seimor ; and, 5 Ed 
ward VI., to Sir Thomas Wroth. 

At BUSTLESHAM. A Priory of Augustine Canons, found 
ed by Hugh de Spencer, Jun., originally for the Knights of 
St. John* of Jerusalem. Valued, at the dissolution, at 
66 II. 14s. 9d. yearly, now worth 13,234/. 15s.; granted, 
7 Edward VI., to Sir Edward Hoby. 

At CHOLSEY, near WALLINGFORD. Monastery, de 
stroyed ; founded by King Ethelred, in the year 986. The 
revenue, at the general dissolution, granted to Sir Francis 
Englefield. 

At DONINGTON, near NEWBURY. A Friary, of the 
Order of the Blessed Trinity, founded 16 Richard II. 
Valued at 20/. 16s. 6d. t now worth 416J. 10s. 

At FARENDON. A Cistercian Cell was settled here, by 
some Monks, in the year 1203. The possessions were 
granted to Sir Francis Englefield. * 

At HURLEY. A Priory, or Cell of Benedictine Monks, 
founded in the reign of William the Conqueror, by Godfrey 
de Magna Villa. Valued, 26 Henry VIII., at 134f. 10s. 8rf. f 
now worth 2,690/. 13s. 4c?.; granted to Leonard Cham- 
berleyn, 36 Henry VIII. 

At POUGHELY, in the Parish of Chaddleworth. A Priory 
of Augustine Canons, founded in the year 1160, by Ralph 
de Chaddleworth. Valued at 711. 10s. 7d, now worth 
1,430*. Us. Sd. 

At READING. In the year 1121, Henry I. founded here 
an Abbey for 200 Benedictine Monks ; income, at the dis 
solution, 2,116/. 3s. 9|d., now worth 42,323/. 15s. 10d.; 
granted, 4 Edward VI., to Edward Duke of Somerset. 

A Friary, in the north side of Castle-street, founded 



LIST OF 

in the year 1400. Granted to the Mayor and Bur 
gesses, as a site for a bridewell! 

At SADDLE FORD. A Priory of Augustine Canons, 
founded in the year 1205, by Jeffrey, Earl of Perch and 
Maud his wife; value 101. yearly, now worth 200/. 

At SHOTTESBROOKE. A" Chantry or College; founded 
in the year 1337, by Sir William Trussel, Knt. ; valued 
3 3L 18s. 8c?., now worth 678/. 13s. 4d.; granted, 2 Ed 
ward VI., to Thomas and Edward Weldon. 

At STEVENTON, or STENINGTON, near Abingdon. An 
Alien Priory of Monks, founded by the Abbey of Bee, in 
Normandy, prior to the reign of Henry I. 

At STRATFIELD-SAY. A Priory of Alien Benedictine 
Monks, founded in the year 1170, by Nicholas de Stotevile. 
At WALLIXGFORD, or WARING. A Benedictine Cell, 
founded in the reign of William the Conqueror, by Gilfrid, 
Abbot of St. Alban; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to John 
Norres. 

A College, endowed before or during the reign of 
King John, by Edmond, Earl of Cornwall; yearly 
revenue 1471. 8s. Qd., now worth 2,848/. Os. I0d.; 
granted, 2 Edward VI., to Michael Stanhope and John 
Bellew. 



BUCKINGHAM (COUNTY). 

At AXKERWYKE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of Henry, by Sir Gilbert de Montficet, Knt. and 
liis son; yearly value 451. 14s. 4c?., now worth 914/. 7s. 8d. 
Granted to Lord Windsor, 31 Hen. VIII. and to Sir Thomas 
Smith, 4 Edward VI. 

At BITTLESDEX. A Cistercian Abbey, founded here 
through the bounty of Erhald de Bosco, in the year 1147; 
yearly value 142J. Is. 3d, now worth 2.842/1 5s.; granted! 
32 Hen. VIII., to Thomas Wriothesley. 

At BRA DE WELL. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the 
reign of Stephen, by the Baron ofWolverton; valued at 
531. Us. Id. yearly, now worth 1,07U 3s. 4d.: granted 
34 Henry VIII. to Arthur Longfield. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At BURNIIAM. An Augustine Nunnery, founded in the 
year 1265, by Richard, King of the Romans; yearly value 
911.5s. ll|d., now worth 1825/. 19s. 2c/., granted, 36 
Henry VIII, to William Tyldesly. 

At ESSERUG, or ASKERIDGE, in the Parish of Fitston. 
A College of Bonhommes, founded by Edmond, Earl of 
Cornwall, in the year 1283 ; valued yearly at447Z. 18s. 0^</., 
now worth 8,958/. 10d.; granted, 17 Elizabeth, to Joha 
Dudly and John Ayscaugh ; it is now the seat of the Duke 
of Bridgewater. 

At GARE, or GORE, in the Parish of Hanslap. A Nun 
nery, destroyed. 

At HOGSHAW. A Hospital of the Knights of St. John of 
Jerusalem, founded about 1180; granted, 35 Henry VI.II., 
to Matilda Lane. 

AtLAViNDEN. An Abbey of Premonstratensians, founded 
and endowed in the reign of Henry II., by John de Bidun. 
Yearly revenue 911. 8s. 3Jd., now worth 1,828/. 5s. IQd.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Sir Edmond Peckham. 

At LUDGARSIIALL, OT LlTTEUSH ALL. All Alien. HoS- 

pital, founded through the bounty of Henry II. 

At MEDMENHAM, or MENDHAM. A Cistercian Abbey, 
founded in the year 1204, by Hugh de Bolebec. Revenue, 
at the dissolution, 23/. 17s. 2cZ. ; now worth 4771. 3s. 4<2. ; 
granted, 38 Henry VIII., to Robert Mone, and others. 

At LITTLE MERLOW, or MINCIIIN MARLO. A Bene 
dictine Nunnery, founded by Geffrey, Lord Spensar, about 
the year 1244. Yearly revenue 37 /. v 6s. lid., now worth 
7461. 18s. 4d.-, granted, 32 Henry VJ1I., to John Tidey 
and E. Restwold. 

At MEURSLEY, or ST. MARGARET S. A Benedictine 
Nunnery, founded by Henry de Blois, Bishop of Winchester, 
in the year 1160. Here nine Nuns were turned out, ad 
their yearly property, 22/. 6s.7cZ., now worth 446/. Us. Sd., 
granted, 29 Henry VIII., to ir John Dance. 

At MJSSENDEX. An Abbey of Augustine Canons, founded 
by Sir William de Missenden, in the year 1133; yearly 
value, at the dissolution, 285Z. 15s. 9^., now worth 5,7 15L 
15s. ; granted, 7 Edward VI., to the Duke of Northumber 
land ; and, 16 Elizabeth x . to Robert Earl of Leicester. 



LIST OF 

At NEWINTON-LONGAVILLE. A Priory of Foreign 
Monks, founded in the reign of Henry I. ; granted to the 
College of Oxford. 

At NOCTELE, or NUTTLEY. An Abbey of Augustine 
Canons, founded in the year 1162, by Walter Giffard, Earl 
of Buckingham, and Ermangard his Lady ; yearly revenue 
4951. 18.9. S&d. , now worth 9,918J. 95. 2d. ; granted, 
1 Edward VL, to Sir William Paget. 

At RAVINSTON. An Augustine Monastery, founded in 
the reign of Henry HI., by the bounty of Peter de Chase- 
port, Pastor of Ivingho; value yearly 661. 13s. 4d., now 
worth 1,333/. 65. 8d.; granted, 2 Edward VL, to Sir 
Francis Bryan. 

At SNELLSHALL. A Benedictine Priory, founded, 
10 Henry III., by Ralph Mortel; yearly revenue 24, 
now worth 480J. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Francis 
Piggot. 

At STONY STRATFORD. An Hospital, founded prior to 
1240. 

At TYKEFORD, or TICKFORD, near Newport St. Mary. 
A Priory of Aliens, founded before 1475; yearly value 
126J. 17s., now, worth 2,537/. ; sold by James I. to Henry 
Atkins, M. D. 

At WENG E. A Priory of Aliens, bestowed, by Maud the 
Empress, to the Monastery of St. Nicholas ; but granted, by 
Henry VIII., to Sir Robert Dormer. 



CAMBRIDGE (COUNTY). 

At ANGLESEY. A Priory of Augustine Canons, founded 
by Henry L ; yearly value 1491. 18s. 6d., now worth 2,99 8 J. 
10s. ; granted to John Hynde, 30 Henry VIII. 

At BAREHAM, or BERCHAM, in the Parish of Lynton. 
A Priory, founded before the reign of Edward I. ; granted, 
31 Henry VIII., to Philip Paris, and afterwards to John 
Millecent, Esq. 

At BARN WELL. A Priory, founded in the year 1092, 
by Picot, a Norman Lord, and his Lady ; yearly value 3511. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

15s. 4cl, now worth 7,0351. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 38 Henry 
VIII., to Antony Brown; and, 6 Edward VI., to Edward 
Lord Clinton. 

At CAMBRIDGE. A Benedictine Cell, founded by John 
de Cranden, Prior of Ely, in the reign of Richard III. ; 
granted to William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich. 

A Gilbertine Priory, founded prior to the year 1291, 
by the bounty, or gift, of B. fil. Waited; yearly 
revenue 16/. 16s., now worth 336/. ; granted, 35 Henry 
VIII., to Ed\vard Ebrington, and Humphrey Metcalf. 

Catherine Hall, founded and endowed about the 
year 1474, by Robert Woodlark, D. D. ; yearly revenue 
at the suppression 39Z. 2s. 7d., now worth 7821. 1 is, Sd. 

Christ s College, for twenty-four Scholars in Gram 
mar, founded by William Bingham, in the year 1442, 
Pastor of St. Zachary, London ; being afterwards aug 
mented by the bounty of others. Yearly revenues at 
the dissolution, 26 Henry VIII., made 190/. 10s. Wd. 9 
now worth 3,8 10/. 17s. 6d. 

King s College, built and endowed in the year 1443, 
by Henry VI. ; revenues valued at 75U. 8s. lc?., now 
worth 15,023/. Is. Sd. 

Queen s College, founded by Margaret of Anjou, 
Queen of Henry VL, about the year 1448 ; yearly in 
come 230/. 15s. 2d., now worth 4,615/. 4s. 2d. 

An Augustine Friary, founded by Sir Jeffrey Piche- 
ford, Knight, before the year 1290 ; granted, 36 Henry 
VIII., to William Keynsham. 

A Dominican Priory, founded by some pious persons 
before the year 1275 ; granted to Edward Elrington 
and Humphrey Metcalf, 35 Henry VIII. 

A Friary of Mendicant Franciscans, founded by the 
bounty of Edward I. Sold, 38 Henry VIII., to the 
Executors of Lady Frances Sidney. 

A Friary of Carmelites, founded by Edward I. and 
by some Noblemen ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John 
Eyer. 

At CIIATERIS. A Benedictine -Nunnery, founded by 
Alfwen, Wife of Ethelstan, Earl of the East Angles, with 



LIST OF 

the advice and assistance of her Brother Ednod, Bishop of 
Ramsey, in the year 980; yearly revenue 1121. 3s. 6c?., now 
worth 2,243J. 10s.; granted, 5 Edward VI., to Edward 
Lord Clinton. 

At CHIPPENHAM. An Asylum of Knights Hospitalers, 
founded, in the year 1184, most bountifully, by William de 
Mandevill ; valued at 33Z, 6s. Sd. yearly, now worth 666/. 
13s. 4d.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir Edward North. 

At DENNY. An Abbey of Minor Nuns, founded, 15 Ed 
ward III., by Mary de St. Paulo, Widow of Adomarc Earl 
of Pembroke; revenues yearly 21 SI. l^cf., now worth 4,360/. 
2s. 6d. , granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Edward Elringtou. 

At ELY. A great Benedictine Priory and Cathedral, 
that had been often destroyed and rebuilt again during the 
various invasions of the Danes, and other convulsions of the 
country, were finally rebuilt and richly endowed, in th 
year 970, by Ethelwold, Bishop of Winchester, through the 
bounty of King Edgar and others. Revenues of the Cathedral 
at the dissolution 2,1 34J. 18s. 6|d, and of the Monastery 
1,084J. 6s. 9d. yearly; now worth 42,698 J. 10s. lOrf., and 
21,686/. 15s. lOrf.; granted in the year 1541. 

An Hospital of Hospitalers, founded here early by a 
Bishop; yearly revenue 25/. 5s. 3%d., now worth 5Q5Z. 
5s. \6d. ; granted, 4 Elizabeth, to the Master and Fel 
lows of Clare Hall, in Cambridge. 

At FORD ii AM. A Convent of Gilbertine Canons, founded 
near this town by the Dean of Fordham, in the reign of 
Henry III.; yearly value 461. 3s. Sd:, now worth 928J. 
1 3s. 4d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Philip Parry. 

At IKELINGTON. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of Henry II., by Aubery de Vere, Earl of Oxford ; 
yearly value 80Z. Is. 10e?., now worth 1,60 1/. I7s.6d.; 
granted, 30 Henry VIII., to the Bishop of Ely. 

At ISELHAM. An Alien Priory, founded here at an 
early period; valued yearly 10/. 13s. 4d., now worth 2131. 
6s. Sd. 

At LYNTON. An Alien Priory. 

At MIRMAUD, MARMONDE, or WELLE. A Gilbertine 
Priory, founded in the reign of Richard I., by Ralph de 
Hauvill; valued, 26 Henry VIII., at 13J. 6s. ld. yearly, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

now worth 266Z. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 10 Elizabeth, to Percival 
Bowes and John Mosyer. 

At SHENGAY, near Wendy. A Preceptory of Kniglits 
Hospitalers, endowed, in the year 1140, by Sibylla de 
Raynes, Daughter of the Earl of Montgomery ; valued at 
1751. 4s. 6d. yearly, now worth 3,504/. *10s. ; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Richard Longe. 

.At SPINNEY, in the Parish of Wykes, or Wicken. An 
Augustine Priory, founded by Sir Hugh de Malebisse and 
Beatrix his Wife, in the reign of Henry III. ; graated, 
36 Henry VIII., to Sir Edward North. 

At STERESBERGH, or STURBRIDGE, near Cambridge. 
An Hospital of Lepers, founded prior to the year 1245, 
under the patronage of the Bishop of Ely ; but granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to the Mayor and Bailiffs of Cambridge; 
and, 4 James I., to John Shelbury, and Philip Chevvte, 
Gentleman. 

At SWAFAM. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded by one 
of the Bolebec family, before the reign of King John; "yearly 
value 461. 10s. 8d., now worth 930Z. 13s. 4d.; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to the Protestant Bishop of Ely. 

At THORN EY. A Benedictine Abbey, founded by the 
first Abbot of Peterburgh, as early as the time of St. Erhel- 
dreda; yearly value 508J. 12s. 5c?., now worth 10.172/. 
8s. 4d. ; granted, 3 Edward VI., to John Earl of Bedford. 



CHESHIRE (COUNTY). 

At BAR AW. An Hospital of the Knights of St. John, of 
Jerusalem, founded in the reign of Edward L, by Robert de 
Bachepuz; yearly value at the dissolution 107/. 3s. 8rf., now 
worth 2, 143 J. 13s. 4d. 

At BERKINIIEAD. A Benedictine Priory, founded in 
the reign of Henry II., by Hamon Massy, Baron of Dunham 
Massy; valued at 102/. 16s. 10c/. yearly, now worth 2,0561. 
16s. Sd. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Ralph Worseley. 

At DUNBURY. A College, founded in the year 13S6, 
by Sir Hugh Calvely, Knight; value 42 /. 2s. 8c?., now 

R5 



LIST OF 

worth 8-KV. 13s. !</. yearly; sold by Queen Kli/abeth to 
Thomas Aldeisev, London, Merchant Taylor. 

At CM KSTFK. A Benedictine Abbey, or Nunnery, founded 
in the time of the Saxons, hut afterwards enlarged hy 
Killed a, Countess of iMercia, and hy other benefactors; 
yearly revenue 1,073/. 17s. 7. ,</., now worth Jl,-177/. 
K s. ( )</. ; granted Jti Henry \ 111. 

A Benedictine Nunnery, founded In the* reign of 
William the Coiujueror, hy Itandal, Karl of Chester; 
valued at !W. H>s. -V, now worth l,i)!W/. , l.v. -h/. ; 
granted, 33 Henry VII I., to Urian Brereton and Son. 

St. John s College, founded hy Kin;; Kthelred, in tho 
yeai (>S .): yearly ineoine at the dissolution 8S/. l().s\ S</., 
now \\-orth l,7 /(>/. 13.v. -\d. ; granted, 4 Kli/ftheth, to 
John 1 orteseue. 

St. John s Hospital, outside the north gate, possessing 
anciently great privileges, and containing at the disso 
lution, Jt lliMiry \111., a (Chaplain and six poor Ure- 
threii: yearly income JS/. llKv. -I;/,, now worth .77 O/. 
(>.v. SJ. 

A l ; riary, founded southward of the city, hy a ttisliop 
of Chester ; granted, !)() Henry Vlll., to John Coke. 

A l ianciscan 1 iiary, founded in th.e reign of Henry 
111.; | ,-ranted to John Coke. 

A Carmelite 1 Viarv, founded in the year 1270, hy 
Thomas Stadham, Gentleman; granted hy Henry \ 111. 

to John Coke. 

At CoMnr.UMF.ur. A Cistercian Ahhey, founded in the 
year 1 133, hy Hugh do Malhane, Lord of Nantwich; yearly 
value J, ">."/., now worth o,100/. ; granted. 3 2 Henry \ 111., 
to William Cotton, Esq., and now it helongs to Sir Robert 
Salushury Cotton. 

At NANTWK-H. An Hospital anciently founded here 
held the tythes, which were giar.ted, (> Elizabeth, to Wil 
liam Cuys. 

At NOUTON. A Priory of Augustine Canons, founded 
by a I\lr. Williams of Chester ; yearly value at tho dissolu 
tion J.OS7. 11s. 8</., now worth , "), 1 7 I/. 13s. -\<(. ; granted, 
o7 Henry V II 1., to Richard llrook. 

At PULTON. A Cistercian Abbey, founded by Robert, 



Ar.nr vs, PRIORI is, e*r. 

hutler to the Karl of Chester, in the year II, ">. >; -.sai.ted, 
. Hi Henry VIM., to \Yilliam Cotton, Ivstj. 

At STAN LAW. A ( isteirian Ahhey, founded hy John 
Constahle ami liaron llolton of Chester, in the year I 1 - - ; 
granted, 7 Kdward VI., to Sir l{oli-rl Cotton, Kni^hi. 

At \ \ 1.1 KOY \ I . Kii! I .dward, in the year 1277, ex 
pended on building ;i lAlonnslery lierr . ? . ,()OD/. : yearly valuo 
at the <lissolution ,>!<>/. (i\. l) -/., now \\cilh LO^Qdf. .. 4rf.; 
5. i Meniy \ lll., to I lutina.; Holerolt. 



At Sr. ANTONY. A Benedictine Coll, I mnuled line as 
raily as luehard s time ; i^anted, (i Kii/.iln-lli, to \\illiani 
and John Killi;;re\v. 

At IIDDMIN. A 1 iiory of Au;.;iisline ( anons, founded, 
in honour of the hones of St. Pelioe that are deposited 
the e, in I he \car ( . <>.">; yearly ineopiea! the dissolai io;i 

ll\. I L/., now worth 5,79 1/, 1 8. 4d.; granted, . n; Henry 

VIII., to Thomas Slendiold. 

At ST. rri;ir\. A < ollejs-, founded hy Ki:iv \ihelslaii 
near the Land s I lnd, in honour of St. HIM iena, a holy woman 
from Ireland, \\lio had an oialory and \\ a , h<nied here. 
Yeaily ineome , r >.>/. 7\. !</., nmv woith I,I07/. i .;. Hd. ; 
granted to the DuKe of Cornwall. 

At (!I:RMAN S. A <!olle;;-ia(( > Chur.-h, fotiaded in honour 
of St. ( ierman, one of the famous 1 Veneh liishops who eamc 
into Inilain to oppose the Pelagian heresy, in (he yeai i . Jh; 
yearly ie\< iiue J-1. J/. S.s\, no\v uoith -I,:! .;/.; ; -;ia!iled ? 
I. ; Mnir> VIM., to Calhaiinr ChamperiuMin, .John K id;-;- 
way, Ve. 

At HI-.I.STOX. A Hospital, founded hy a .Mr. l\ \ Hebrew, 
a.l an early period; yeaily value 1 I /. 7.x-. \>L, now worth 
2H7/. C.s-. Sr/. 

At ST. KAUKVTOC. A Collri fe, founded in the rei;;n of 
Kdward the Coid essor, in honour of St . Carantoeus, diseiple 
of Si. I ahiel. ; yearly valuo >^ 11 /. l.".\. 8d., DOW woith 
1,7 ( J6/. l. !v. -It/.; now in the patronage of John Huller, lv,.|. 



LIST OF 

At LANACHEBRAN. A Cistercian Cell, founded about 
the Conquest, under the tutelage of St. Achebran ; granted, 
2 Elizabeth, to Francis Earl of Bedford. 

At LAUNCESTON. A College of Augustine Canons, 
founded before the Conquest, about half a mile from this 
town; yearly revenue 392. 11s. 2ei, now worth 7,85H. 
35. 4d. ; granted 26 Henry VIII. 

At ST. MICHAEL S MOUNT. A Priory of Alien Monks, 
founded in the year 1085, by Edward the Confessor; yearly 
value 110J. 12s. 0|c?., now worth 2/212/. IQd. 

At PENRYN, or GLASENEY, in the Parish of Gluvias. A 
College, built by the good Bishop of Exeter, Walter Brones- 
comb, in the year 1270; valued at 205J. 10s. 6d., now 
worth 4,1 10Z. 10s. 

At ST. PROBUS. A College, founded before the Con 
quest; yearly income 22/. 10s., now worth 4501. ; granted 
26 Henry VIII. 

At ST. SYRIAC. A Cluniac Cell, founded as early as 
the time of Richard I.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Lau 
rence Courtney. 

At TRELEIGII, or TURLEIGH. APreceptory of Knights 
Hospitalers, founded by the bounty of Henry de Pomerai 
and Reginald Marsh; yearly value 81Z. 8s. 5d., now worth 
1,628/. 8s. 4rf. This, among other undisposed possessions, 
belonged to the Hospitalers 5 Philip and Mary ; but was 
granted at their dissolution, 16 Elizabeth, to Henry Wilby 
and George Blythe. 

At TRURO. A Dominican Convent, founded by the 
Keskiner family, in the reign of Henry III.; granted, 
7 Edward VI., to Edward Anglianby. 

At TRUWARDRAITH, in the Deanery of Pawder. An 
Alien Priory of Benedictine Monks, founded in the year 
1169, by some Noblemen ; yearly value 15H. 16s. Id., now 
worth 3,036/. Is. 8d.,; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Edward 
Earl of Hertford. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



CUMBERLAND (COUNTY). 

At ARMETHWAIT. A Benedictine Nunnery, endowed 
by William Rufus; yearly value lSl.8s.8d,, now worth 
368/. 13s. 4c?. 5 granted, 6 Edward VI., to William Gryme, 
or Carleil. 

At ST. BEE S. A Benedictine Cell, or Monastery, founded 
in the year 650, by Bega, a holy Woman from Ireland. 
There were a Prioress and six Nuns at the dissolution. 
Yearly income 149J. 19s. M., now worth 2,999f.-10s.; 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas Challoner. 

At CALDRE, in Copeland, near Egremond. A Cistercian 
Abbey of Monks, founded in the year 1134, by Ranulph, 
Earl of Chester; income at the dissolution 641. 3s. 9d., now 
worth 1,2S3/. 15s.; granted, 30 Henry VIIL, to Thos. Leigh. 

At CARLISLE. An Augustine Priory of Monks, and a 
Nunnery, founded in the year 686 ; were destroyed in the 
Danish wars, but rebuilt by William Rufus, and Walter, a 
Norman Priest. Income 53 II. 4s. lie?., now worth 1 0,624. 
18s. 4d. 

St. Nicholas Hospital, founded by the Ancestors of 
Richard I. for thirteen Lepers; granted, 33 Henry VIII. 

AtGRAYSTOKE. A Collegiate Church, founded before 
the year 1359, by William Lord Graystock; yearly income 
82J. 14s., now worth 1,654J. ; granted, 6 Elizabeth, to Wil 
liam Grice, and Antony Foster. 

At HOLM CULTRAM. A Cistercian Abbey, founded by 
Henry, Son to David King of Scotland, in the year 1150; 
income 5351. 3s. 7d., now worth 10,703/. 12s. 6d. 

At KIRK OSWALD. A College of twelve secular Priests, 
founded, 20 Henry VIIL, by Robert Threlkeld ; valued at 
781. 17s., now worth 1,577/. ; granted, 30 Elizabeth, to 
Edward Downinge, and Miles Doddinge, Esqrs. 

At LANERCOST. An Augustine Monastery, founded in 
the year 1169, by Robert de Villibus, Lord of Gilleisland ; 
yearly value 79/. 19s., now worth l ,599Z; granted to Tho 
mas Lord Dacre. 

At SETON, alias LEKELY, A Benedictine Nunnery,, 
founded by Henry Kirby; yearly income 131.17 s Ad., now 



LIST OF 

worth Till 6s. 8rf.; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Hugh 
Askue. 

At WETHEIIALL. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the 
reign of William Rufus, by Ranulph Meschin, Earl of Cum 
berland; income 128J. 5s. 3jd., now worth 2,565Z. 5s. 10o?.; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII. 



DERBY (COUNTY). 

At DE BELLO CAPITE, near Norton. An Abbey of White 
Canons, founded in the year 1183, by Robert Lord Alfreton, 
one of the executioners of the Archbishop of Canterbury, 
Thomas a Becket; income 157Z. 10s. 2c?., now worth 
3,150^ 3s. 4d. ; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to Sir Nicholas 
Strelly. 

At BRISOLL. An Augustine Friary, founded in the reign 
of Henry III. ; income 10?. 17s. 9d., now worth 217/. 15s. ; 
granted, 6 Edward VI,, to Henry Duke of Suffolk. 

At CALKE. An Augustine Cell, founded in the year 
1161, by Maud, Widow of the Earl of Chester; granted, 
1 Edward VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

At CHESTERFIELD. An Hospital of Lepers, founded as 
early as the reign of Richard I. ; suppressed by Henry VIII. 

At LE DALE, in the Deanery of Derby. A Premonstra- 
tensian Abbey, founded in the reign of Henry II., by Sterlo 
de Grendon; yearly income 144. 12s., now worth 2,892/. ; 
granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Francis Poole. 

At DERBY. A Cell of Cluniac Monks, founded in the 
year 1140, by Waltheof; yearly income 10/., now worth 
200/. ; dissolved in the reign of Henry VIII. 

All Saints College; income 38/. 14s., now worth 7747. 
A Monastery of Friars (Dominicans) ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to John Hynde. 

At LITTLE DIRBY, or DARLEY. An Augustine Friary, 
founded in the reign of Henry I., by Robert de Ferraris, 
Earl of Derby ; yearly income 285/. 9s. 6d. 3 now worth 
5,709J. 10s. Wd. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir William 
West. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At GREISLEY, in the Deanery of Repingdon. A Priory 
of Augustine Canons, founded in the reign of Henry I., by 
William de Greisley; income 39/. 13s. Sd., now worth 
793J. 13s. 4d.; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Henry Cruche. 

At KING S MEAD, near Derby. A Benedictine Nun 
nery, founded in the year 1160, by the Abbess of Derby; 
value 2H. 18s. 8d., now worth 438Z. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Francis Earl of Shrewsbury. 

At REPINGDON. A Monastery of Augustine Monks 
stood here in the year 660 ; destroyed in the Danish Wars, 
but rebuilt in the year 1172, by Maud, widow of Ranulph, 
Earl of Chester; yearly income 167/. 18s. 2d, now worth 
3,358J. 3s. 4d. 

At SPITTEL, on the Peak, bet\veen the villages of Hope 
and Castleton, an Hospital, founded 12 Edward III. ; 
valued, 26 Henry VIII., at 2/. yearly, now worth 40J. 

At YEVELY, or STEDE. A Preceptory of Knights Hos 
pitalers, founded in the reign of Richard I., by Ralph le 
Fun and Sir William Meynill, in the year 1268; valued at 
107Z. 3s. 8|d. yearly, now worth 2,1 431. 14s. 3d. ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Charles Lord Montjoy. 



DEVON (COUNTY). 

At AXMINSTER. A College, founded by King Ethelstan, 
for seven Priests, to pray for the souls of those \vho were 
slain in a battle which he fought against the Danes, at 
Bremaldown, near this place. 

At AXMOUTH. An Alien Priory, founded by Richard de 
Rivers, Earl of Devonshire, in the reign of Henry II. ; 
granted, 6 Edward VI., to Walter Erie. 

At BARXSTAPLE, in the Deanery of Barnstaple. A 
Cluniac Priory, founded in the reign of William the Con 
queror, by Johel, of Totness ; yearly value 129Z. 15s. 3|c?., 
now worth 2,595 J. 5s. lOd. ; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to 
William Lord Howard. 

At BUCKLAND, in the Deanery of Tamerton. A Cister- 



LIST OF 

cian Abbey, founded in the year 1278 X by Amicia, Countess 
of Devonshire; yearly income 341 Z., now worth 6,820J. ; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Richard Greynfeld. 

At BUCKFASTRE. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1137, by Ethel werd, son of William Pomerei ; income 
4661. Us. 2%d.; now worth 9,331Z. 4s. 2d.: granted, 
31 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas Dennys. 

At CARESWELL. A Cluniac Cell, founded at some early 
period; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to John Etherege or 
Athrege. 

AtCnuLMELEiGH. A College, said to have been founded, 
before the time of Edward I., by the Lady of the Manor, 
for seven children, whom she saved from being drowned by 
their own father, who looked upon himself as unable to 
maintain them ; yearly income 24. 85. 4d., now worth 
488J. 6s. Sd. 

At CORXWORTIIY, in the Deanery of Totness. An Au 
gustine Nunnery, founded by the Edgecomb family; in 
come 631. 3s. 10d., now worth 1,263/. 16s- Sd. ; granted, 
2 Elizabeth, to Edward Harris and John Williams. 

At CREDITOR, or KIRTOX, in the Deanery of Kenne. 
A College, founded in the Saxon times, but underwent 
afterwards many alterations; yearly income, at the disso 
lution, 332Z. 17s. 5cZ., now worth 6,6571. 9s. 2J. yearly; 
granted, 37 Henry VIIL, to Elizabeth Countess of Bath 
and to Sir Thomas Darcy. 

At DUNKESWELL. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1201, by William Bri were; yearly income 298/. lls.lOc?., 
now worth 5,97 U. 16s. 80?.; granted, 26 Henry VIIL, to 
John Lord Russell. - 

At EXETER. The number of religious houses here sup 
pressed is not known; though, from the celebrity of this 
city, in the Roman, British and Saxon times, there is not 
the least doubt that vast numbers of religious, of all orders, 
flocked hither. There is particular mention of three 
religious houses, within the precincts of the city : first, a 
Nunnery, which is now the Dean s house; second, a Monas 
tery, founded by Ethelred, in the year 868 ; and the third, 
a Monastery, founded in the year 932, by Ethelstan, and 
endowed v>ith twenty-six villages for its support. The Monks 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

repeatedly fled, for fear of the Danes, but were finally re 
called, and settled in more lands and privileges than ever, by 
King Canute, in the year 1019. 

A Benedictine Priory, founded by William the Con 
queror; yearly income 145Z. 12s., now worth 2,912; 
granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas Denys. 

Boneville s Hospital, founded in the year 1407, by 
Sir William Boneville, in Rock s-lane, for twelve poor 
people, with the income of fifty marks per annum. 
This Almshouse was demolished, and the site converted 
into a garden, and granted to Newton, Esq. 

St. Mary Magdalene Hospital, founded prior to the 
year 1163, without the south gate, to which Bishop 
Bartholomew Iscantis was a benefactor; granted, 
26 Henry VIII. 

A Dominican Friary, founded on the north side of 
the Cathedral Church ; granted, by Edward I., to John 
Lord Russel, now called Bedford-house. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded without the south 
gate, in the reign of Edward I., by Bishop Button ; 
dissolved and granted to Humphrey Holies. 

At FORD, in the parish of Thorncomb. A Cistercian 
Abbey, founded in the year 1136, by Richard Fitz Baldwin, 
Sheriff of Devonshire, and by Andelicia, his sister and 
heiress; yearly income 38H. 10s. 6|cL, now worth 
770/. 10s. Wd. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Richard 
Pollard. 

At FRETHELSTOKE,or FRISTOKE. An Augustine Friary, 
founded, 8 Henry III., by Sir Robert Beauchamp, Knt. ; 
year-y income 127Z. 2s. 4|<i., now worth 2,542/. 7s. 6d. ; 
granted, 29 Hen. VIII., to Arthur Viscount Lisle. 

At HERTLAKD. An Augustine Monastery, founded, in 
the reign of Henry II., by Githa, wife to the Earl Godwin ; 
yearly income 306/. 13s. 2{cf., now worth 6,133/. 4s. 2a 7 .; 
granted, 37 Hen. VIII. to William Abbot. 

At LEGII, or LEYE, in the parish of Burlescombe. An 
Augustine Nunnery, founded, in the reign of Henry II., by 
Walter Clavell; yearly income 202J. 15s. 3d., now worth 
4,055/. 5s. ; granted, 35 Henry VIII. to Sir John St. Leger. 



LIST OF 

At MODBURY, in the Deanery of Plymton. An Alien 
Priory, founded, in the reign of Stephen, by Sir Peter 
sur Dive, in Normandy. 

At NEWENI-IAM, or NEXT HAM, in the parish of Axmin- 
ster. A Cistercian Abbey, founded, in the year 1246, by 
Reginald de Mohun, Earl of Somerset; income 23 II. 14s, 4c?. 
yearly, now worth 4,634/. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 5 Elizabeth, to 
Thomas Duke of Norfolk. 

At OTTER Y. A College, founded in the year 1337, by 
John Gradison, of Exeter ; income 303/. 2s. 9d. yearly, 
now worth 6,062/. 15s.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Ed 
ward Earl of Hertford. 

At OTTERINGTON. An Alien Priory, founded in the 
reign of William the Conqueror, by the Monks of St. Mi 
chael, in Normandy, income 87Z, 10s. 4$. yearly, now worth 
1,7501. 6s. 8d. ; granted 31 Henry VIII., as parcel of Sion, 
to Richard Duke. 

At PILTON, near Barnstaple. A Benedictine Cell, founded 
by King Ethelstan ; valuation 561. 12s. 8|J., now worth 
l,132f. 14s. 2d. 

At PLYMOUTH. A Friary, in the east part of the town ; 
granted, 38 Henry VIII., to Giles Iselham. 

At PLYMTON. A Free Chapel of Augustines, founded, 
in the year 1T21, by William Warlewast, Bishop of Exeter; 
value912Z. 12s. 8JdL, now worth 18,252J. 14s. 2d.; granted, 
2 Elizabeth, to Arthur Champernoun. 

At POLLESHOO. A Benedictine Nunnery, erected in the 
reign of Richard I , by William Briwere, Bishop of Exeter; 
value 170/. 2s. 3d. yearly, now worth 3,402/. 5s. I0d; 
granted, in the reign of Edward VI., to John Earl of 
Warwick. 

At SLAPTOX. A College, founded, in the year 1373, by 
Sir Guy de Brien ; granted, 37 Henry VIII. , to Thomas 
Arundel. 

At TAVESTOCK A Benedictine Abbey, founded, in- the 
year 961, by Ordgar, Earl of Devonshire, and his son; 
valued at 902J. 5s. l\d. yearly, now worth 18,045/. 12s. 6d.; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to John Lord Russel. 

At ToRR,in the Deanery of Iplepen. APremonstratensian 
Abbey, founded, in the year 1196, by William Briwere; 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

yearly value 396?. Os. lid., now worth 7,920?. 18s. 4c?.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII. to Sir John St. Leger. 

At TOTNESS. An Alien Priory, founded, in the reign 
of William the Conqueror, by John Aluredi; value 
124?. 10s. 2Jc?. yearly, now worth 2,490?. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Catherine Champernoun and others. 



DORSET (COUNTY.) 

At ABBOTSBURY. A Benedictine Abbey, founded by 
Orcius, steward to King Canute, in the year 1026 ; income 
485?. 3s. 5\d. yearly, now worth 9,703?. 9s. 2d. ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Sir Giles Strangwaies. 

At ATHELINGTOX. An Hospital, founded at an early 
time, by Mr. Chidiock; income 71. Ss. 4d. yearly, now 
worth 148?. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 3 Edward VI. to Sir Michael 
Stanhope. 

At BIXDOX. A Cistercian Abbey, founded, in the year 
1172, by Robert de Burgo and his wife Maud; income 
229?. 2s. l{d. yearly, now worth 4,582?. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Sir Richard Poynings. 

At BRIDPORT. A Prior} -, at the end of the town; in 
come 6?. yearly, now worth 120?.; converted into a dwel 
ling-house, called St. Jones. 

An Hospital over the bridge, to J;he west of the town ; 
income 8?. 6s. lc?. yearly, now worth 166?. Is. Sd. 

At CERX, or CERNELL. A Benedictine Abbey, founded 
in the Saxon times, by a Mr. Egeiward ; underwent several 
changes in after times; valued, at the dissolution, at 
623?. 13s. 2c?., now worth 12,473?. 4s. 2c?. ; granted, 
17 Elizabeth, to John Dudley and others. 

AtCRAXBURX,inthe Deanery of Pimpern. ABenedictine 
Cell, founded in the year 980, by Elwardus Snew ; granted, 
2 Elizabeth, to Thomas Francis. 

At DORCHESTER. St. John s Hospital. 

A Franciscan Abbey, founded, 4 Edward II., 
by the ancestors of Sir John Chidiock; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Sir Edmund Peckham. 



LIST OF 

At FRAMPTOX. An Alien Priory, founded by William 
the Conqueror ; granted, 14 Elizabeth, to Sir Christopher 
Hatton, who sold it to John Brown, Esq. 

At HOLME. A Cluniac Cell, founded before the reign of 
Edward I.; granted, 1 Edward VI. to John Hannon. 

At HORTON. A Benedictine Cell, founded, in the year 
&70, by Ordgar Earl of Devonshire ; granted, 1 Edward VI., 
to Edward Duke of Somerset, and after his attainder, to 
William Earl of Pembroke, 7 Edward VI. 

At LODRES. An Alien Priory, founded in the reign of 
Henry I., by Richard de Redveriis. 

At LYME. An Hospital; valued at 38?. 11s.; now 
worth 771 j. 

At MAYNE. A Preceptory of Knights Hospitalers; 
granted, 6 Elizabeth, to William Pole and Edward Downing. 

AtMELCOMB,orMiLTo:N T . A Dominican Friary, founded 
by Rogers, of Brianston ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Sir 
John Rogers, of the same family. 

At MIDDLETON. A Benedictine Abbey, founded by 
King Ethelstan, in the year 933, to expiate the murder of 
his brother Edwin ; income 720/. 4s. Id., yearly, now worth 
14,408?. Is. Sd. granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Sir John 
Tregonwall. 

At SIIATTESBURY. Benedictine Nunnery, founded, in 
the year 888, by King Alfred ; value 1,329Z. Is. 3d. yearly, 
now worth 26,581?. 5s. ; granted, 1 Edward VI., to William 
Earl of Southampton. 

St. John s Hospital, super montem de Shaftesbury, 
founded ; granted, 2 Edward VI., to Randal Burgh 
and others. 

An Almshotise, in St. James s parish, in the west 
side of St. Mary s -lane; granted, 28 Elizabeth, to 
Edward Read. 

At SHIREBURX. A Benedictine Abbey, founded, about 
the year 1*200, by King John; value, at the dissolution, 
6921. Us. 7d. yearly, now worth 13,654?. 12s. 6d. ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Sir John Horsey. 

At SPECTESBURY. An Alien Priory, founded, in the reign 
of Henry I., by Robert Earl of Mallent and Leicester; 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Charles Blount Lord Mountjoy, 
as parcel of the possessions of Witham. 

At TARENT. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded, in the 
year 1230, by Richard Power, Bishop of Chichester ; va 
lued, at the dissolution, at 239 J. lls. 10d., now worth 
4,6911. 16s. 8d.; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas 
Wyat. 

At WARHAM. Alien Priory, bestowed, in the reign of 
Henry I., to the Convent of Lira, in Normandy, by Robert 
Earl of Leicester; granted to Thomas Reve and George 
Cotton. 

At WILCIIESWOOD. A Priory, founded here, at a 
very early period ; value 12/. 16s. 4d. yearly, now worth 
256/. 6s. Sd. suppressed, with the minor Monasteries, in 
the reign of Henry VIII. 

At WINBURN, or TWINBORN. A Nunnery, founded, in 
the year 705, by St. Cuthburga, daughter of Kenred, King 
of the West Saxons, where several of the Saxon Kings were 
buried ; valuation, at the dissolution, 131/. 14s., now worth 
2,634/. ; granted, 1 Edward VI., to Edward Dukx? of So 
merset, then to Giles Keylway and William Leonard, but 
finally to Edward Lord Clinton. 



DURHAM (COUNTY). 

At Bis H OP S AUCKLAND. A College, founded and well 
endowed by Anthony Beck, Bishop of Durham; yearly 
value 180Z. 3s. 2c?., now worth 3,603 J. 3s. 4d. 

At CHESTER ON THE STREET. A College, founded in 
in the year 883, by Bishop Eardulfus, who had been forced 
to flee hither with the body of St. Cuthbert from Lindisfarn. 
The seven Prebends here were valued, 26 Henry VIII. , at 
771. 12s. Sd., now worth 1,552Z. 13s. 4d. 

At DERLINGTON. A College, founded early, by Hugh 
Pusar, Bishop of Durham, in the reign of Henry II. ; valued 
at 51/. 8s. 4d., now worth 1,028J. 6s. 8c?. 

At DURHAM. A Cathedral, and Benedictine Priory, 
founded about the year Q9.5. The body of the tutelar 



LIST OF 

"\ . . 

Saint, Cuthbert, was magnificently enshrined behind the 
high altar; yearly income 4,4361. 16s. 3d., now worth 
S&,736/. 5s. 

At FINCHALE. A Benedictine Cell, -founded in the 
year 1128, by Randal r Bishop of Durham, for the Monks 
of Durham ; yearly value 146Z. 19s. 2d., now worth 2,9397. 
3s. 4d. ; granted, 26 Henry VIII., to the Dean and Chapter 
of Durham. 

St. Edmond s Hospital, founded by Nicholas de 
Farneham, Bishop of Durham, in the year 1247; yearly 
value 109/. 4s. 4d., now worth 2,184Z. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 
7 Edward VI., to the Mayor and Burg-esses of New 
castle. 

At GRETHAM. An Hospital, founded in the year 1262, 
by Robert de Stichill, Bishop of Durham ; yearly value 
97/. 6s. 3d., now worth 1,9461. 5s. 10c?.; granted, 
26 Henry VIII., to the Bishop of Durham. ; 

At JARROW. A Benedictine Cell, or Monastery, founded 
in the year 684, by King Egfrid. The learned and vene 
rable Bede had his education here. Yearly income 40/. 
7s. 8cL now worth 807J. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., 
to William Lord Eure. 

At KEY PIER, near Durham. An Hospital, founded in 
the year 1112, by Randal Bishop of Durham, and Hugh, 
Bishop of the said place; yearly income 167/. 2s. lie?., now 
worth 3,340/. 18s. 4d.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Sir 
William Paget. 

At LANGCESTER. A College, founded in the year 1283, 
by Anthony Beck, Bishop of Durham ; yearly income 
491. 3s. 4c?., now worth 983Z. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 7 Edward 
VI., to Simon Weldbury, and Christopher Moreland. 

At NORTON. A College, anciently founded, in the 
patronage of the Bishop of Durham; valued yearly at 
341. 13s. 4d., now worth 693 J. 6s. Qd. 

At SHIRBURN. An Hospital, founded by the above- 
mentioned Hugh Pusar, Bishop of Durham, in the reign of 
Henry II. : yearly revenue 135/. 7s., now worth 2,707J. 
Here were maintained sixty-five Lepers, a Master, and 
some Priests. Granted, in the reign of Henry VIII., to the 
Bishop of Durham. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At STAINDROP. A College, founded in the reign of 
Henry IV 7 ., by Ralph Nevill, Earl of Westmoreland, for 
.six decayed Gentlemen, six poor Officers, and other poor 
Men; yearly revenue 126J. 5s. 10c?., now worth 2,525. 
8s. 4d. 

At WERMOUTH. A Benedictine Cell, built by the 
famous Abbot, Benedict Biscopius, in the year 674, who 
received this town from King Egfrid. Yearly value 26, 
now worth 520 /. ; granted, 37 Henry VIIL, to Thomas 
Whitehead. 



ESSEX (COUNTS?). 

At BERDEX. An Augustine Friary, founded, in the reign 
of Henry III.; yearly income 311. 5s. \\d. ; now worth 
6251. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Henry Parker. 

At BERK ING, or, Bedenham. A Benedictine Nunnery, 
founded in the year 675, by Erkinwald, son of Anna, King 
of the East Angles, and afterward Bishop of London; yearly 
income 1,084/. 6s.-2irf., now worth 2i,686/. 4s. 2d. ; 
granted, 5 Edward VI., to Edward Lord Clinton. 

At BILEIGH, near Maldon. Premonstratensian Abbey, 
founded, in the year 1180, by Robert Mantel; income 
196/. 6s. 5d. yearly, now worth 3,926/. Ss. 4d. ; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Sir John Gate. 

. At BLACKMORE. An Augustine Monastery, founded, in 
the reign of King John, by Adam and Jordan de Samford ; 
income 85/. 9s. Id. yearly, now worth 1,709/. lls. 8d. ; 
granted, 32 Henry VIII., to John Smith. 

At CHELMESFORD. A Dominican Friary, founded at an 
early date here, or in the adjoining hamlet Fulsham ; income 
9/. 6s. 5d. yearly, now worth 186/. 8s. 4d. granted, 
34 Henry VIII., to Antony Bonvixi. 

At CHICII. An Augustine Priory, founded, by Richard 
de Belmeis, Bishop of London and St. Osith, before the 
year 11 18; income 758/. 5s. 8^., now worth 15,165/. 8s. 4d.; 
granted, 31. Henry VIII., to Thomas Lord Cromwell, and 
after his attainder, to Sir Thomas Darcy, 5 Edward VI. 



LIST OF 

At COGGESHALE, or COXHALL. A Cistercian Abbey, 
founded, in the year 1 142, by King Stephen ; yearly income 
298/. 85., now worth 5,968/. ; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to 
Sir Thomas Seymor. 

At COLCHESTER. A Benedictine Abbey, founded, in the 
year 1096, by Eudo, courtier of William the Conqueror; 
income 523/. 17s. 0d. yearly, now worth 10,4777. Os. 10d.; 
granted, 1 Edward VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

An Augustine Friary, founded, in the reign of 
Henry I., in the south part of the town, by Ernulphus, 
who became afterwards prior of it ; income 1 13/. 12s. 8d. 
yearly, now worth 2,2727. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 28 
Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas Audley. 

A Friary, without the walls of the town, on the 
southward, founded, in the year 1244, for the crouched 
Friars ; value 71. 7s. 8 rf. yearly, now worth 147/. 13s.4c?.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Thomas Lord Audley. 

Monastery of Grey Friars, founded, in the year 1309, 
by Robert Lord Fitzwalter, near the east gate, who be 
came a Friar before his death, in 1325; granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to Francis Jobson and Andrew Audley, 
and by King Edward VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

At COLUM ; or COLUN. A Benedictine Priory, founded 
in the reign of Henry I., by Atbericus de Vere, who became 
a Monk there ; yearly value 175^. 14s. 8d., now worth 
3,514/. 14s. 2d.; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to John Earl of 
Oxford. 

At CRESSING TEMPLE. A Preceptory of Knights Tem 
plars, founded by King Stephen, in the year 1150 ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Sir W. Hughes, Knight. 

At DUNMOWE PARVA. An Augustine Monastery, 
founded, in the year 1104, by Lady Juga; revenues 
1731. 2s. 4d., now worth 3,462 J. 6s. 8rf.; granted, 28 
Henry VIII. , to Robert Earl of Sussex. 

At HALSTEDE. A Benedictine Cell, founded, in the 
reigri of William the Conqueror, by Ingelrica, wife of 
Ranulf Peverell; income 83/. 19s. Id. yearly, now worth 
1,679/. Us. 8d.; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to Giles Leigh. 

At HALFIELD REGIS. A Benedictine Priory, founded, 
in the year 1140, by Aubrey de Vere, father of the Earl of 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

Oxford ; revenues 1571. 3s. 2%d., now worth 3,143/. 45. 2^.; 
granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Thomas Noke. 

At CASTLEHEDINGHAM, or HEXIXGHAM. A Bene 
dictine Nunnery, founded, in the year 1190, by Aubrey de 
Vere, first Earl of Oxford, or rather by his Countess Lucia, 
who became the first Prioress; revenues, at the suppres 
sion, 291. 125. IQd, now worth 392/. 16s. 8c7. ; granted, 
28 Henry VIII., to John Earl of Oxford. 

At HO"RKESLEY PARVA. A Cluniac Priory, founded, in 
the reign of Henry I., by Robert Fiiz Godebdld; revenues 
-38/. 14s. 7d., now worth 7741. 11s. Sd. 

At LATTON. An Augustine Priory, founded, before 
20 Edward I., by some person, whose name is not known j 
granted, 28 Henry VIII. , to Sir Henry Parker. 

At LAYER MORNEY. A College, founded, in the year 
1330, by William de Morney, Lord of the Manor. 

An Hospital, or Almshouse, erected, in the year 
1523, in pursuance of the will of Henry Lord Morney; 
granted, by Queen Elizabeth, to William Tipper and 
Robert Da we. 

At LIGHES. An Augustine Priory, founded, in the reign 
of Henry III., by Sir Ralph Gernoun ; yearly revenue 
141/. 14s. Sd., now worth 2,834Z. I3s.4d.; granted, 27 
Henry VIII., to Sir Richard Rich. 

At MALDOX. A Carmelite Friary, founded, in the reign 
of Edward II., by some persons unknown ; value 26/. 0,?. 8c. 
yearly, now worth 520/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., 
to George Duke and John Sterr. 

At MALDON JUXTA. An Hospital for the leprous towns 
men, founded by some one of the ancient Kings of England ; 
granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Thomas Dyer; and, 25 Eliza 
beth, to Theophilus and Robert Adams. 

At LITTLE MAPLESTED. A Preceptory of Knights Hos 
pitalers, founded, in the reign of Henry I., by Juliana, 
daughter and heiress of Robert Dorsnell ; granted, at the 
dissolution, to George Harper. 

At MERCY, or W^EST MERESEY. An Alien Priory, 
founded by King Edward the Confessor; granted, 34 
Henry VIII., to Robert Dacres, Esq. 

At NEWPORTPOXD. An Hospital, founded in the reign 
s 



LIST OF 

of King John, by Richard Serb ; valuation 237. 10s. 8d., 
now worth 4701. 13s. 4.d. ; granted, by Henry VIII., to Sir 
Martin Bowes. 

At PAUNSFIELD. An Alien Priory, founded, 4 William 
the Conqueror, by Walteran Fitz Ranulph; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Sir Giles Caple. 

At PLECY. A College, founded, 17 Richard II., by 
Thomas Duke of Gloucester ; valuation 1397. 3s. Wd. 
yearly, now worth 2,7837. 18s. 4d. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., 
to John Gales. 

At PRITTLEWEL-L. A Cluniac Priory, founded, in tlie 
reign of Henry II., by Robert Fitz Swain ; yearly value 
1947. 14s. 3d., now worth 3,8947. 5s. 10c7. ; granted, 29 
Henry VIII., to Thomas Audley ; and, 5 Edward VI., to 
Sir Richard Rich. * 

At SEDEBURBROOK. A Free Chapel, founded in the 
reign of Edward I. ; granted, 7 Edward VI., to Sir Anthony- 
Brown and Richard Weston. 

At STANESGATE, in the parish of Steeple. A Cluniac 
Priory, founded by the predecessors of the Prior of Lewes, 
antecedently to the year 1176; value 437. 85. 6d. yearly, 
now worth 8687. 10s.; granted, 25 Henry VIII.,Uo Ed 
mund Mordaunt. 

At STRATFORD, in the parish of West Ham. A Cis 
tercian Abbey, built, in the year 1134, by William de Mont- 
iichet; income 5737. 15s. 6d. yearly, now worth 11,4757. 
10s. Wd. , granted, 30 Henry VIIL, to Peter Meawtis, Esq. 

At THOBEY, near INGATESTONE. An Augustine Priory, 
founded early, by Michael Capra and wife and son ; value 
75/. 10s. 6d. yearly, now worth 1,5107. 10s.; granted, 
22 Henry VIIL, to Sir Richard Page, Knt. 

At TIT REMIT ALL. An Augustine Priory, founded, in the 
reign of William the Conqueror, by Gilbert de Montefixo ; 
valuation 70/. 19s. 3d ; now worth 1,4197. 5s. 10e7. ; 
granted, 28 Efenry VIIL, to John Carey. 

At TILTEY. A Cistercian Abbey, founded, about the 
year 1152, by Robert Ferrers, Earl of Derby and Mau 
rice Fitz Jeffery; valuation 1777. 9s. 4(7., now worth 
3,5497. 6s. Sd.; granted, 35 Henry VIIL, to Thomas Lord 
Audley. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At TIPTREE. An Augustine Monastery, founded, in the 
reign of Edward I., by Ralph de Munchensi ; value 22/. 
165. 4c7." yearly, now worth 4567. 65. Sd. 
. At LITTLE WALDEN. A Benedictine Abbey of Monks, 
founded, in the year 1136, by Jeffry Mandevil, Earl of 
Essex; income 4*06/. 15s. lid. yearly, now worth 8,135/. 
18s. 4rf.; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas Audley. 

At WALTHAM. An Augustine Monastery, founded, in 
the year 1062, by Earl Harold; value 1,079/. 12s. Id. 
yearly, now worth 21, 592/. Is. Sd.; granted, } Edward VI., 
to Sir Antoney Denny. 

At WIKES. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, in the 
reign of Henry I., by Walter and Alexander Mascherell, 
brothers; value 92/. 12*. 3d., now worth 1,852/. 5s.; 
granted, by Henry VIII. 

At WUDEHAM. An Augustine Monastery, founded, in 
the reign of Henry II., by Maurice Fitz Jeffery and Tiretai, 
Sheriff of Essex; granted, 31 Henry VIII. ? to Henry 
Foisted. 



GLOUCESTER (COUNTY.) 

At BECCANFORD. An Alien Priory, given, in the reign 
of Henry I., to the Abbey of St. Martin, in Normandy; 
value 531. 6s. 8c?. yearly, now worth 1,066J. 13s. 4c?.; 
granted, 1 Edward VI., to Sir Richard Lee. 

At CIRENCESTER. An Augustine Monastery, magni 
ficently built, in the year 1117, by Henry I. ; yearly value 
1,05U 7s. llrf., now worth 21,027/. 2s. 6d.; granted, 
1 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas Seymour; 6 Elizabath, to 
Richard Masters. 

At DAEGLESFORD. A Monastery, founded, in the year 
718, by one Begia, on a scite, granted him for that purpose, 
by King Ethelbald; dissolved. 

At DEREHURST. An Alien Priory, founded, about the year 
980, by Doddo Duke of Mercia; granted, 34 Henry VIII., 
to William Throckmorton. 

At FLEXELEY, or DENZ. A Cistercian Abbey, founded, 
s 2> 



LIST OF 

in the time of Stephen, by Roger Earl of Hereford; value 
112/. 13s. \d. yearly, now worth 2,253. Is. Sd.; granted, 
36 Henry VIII. , to Sir Antony Kingston. 

At GLOUCESTER. A Benedictine Abbey, founded, in the 
year 680, by Wulphere, the first Christian King of Mercia, 
and Ethelred, his brother and successor, who was afterwards 
Monk and Abbot of Bardney. There were, according to the 
Saxon custom, religious of both sexes : this house was 
honoured by having, for ninety years, three Queens succes 
sively the presiding Abbesses ; valuation, at the dissolution, 
1,550/. 4s. 5jc/., now worth 31,004/. 9s. 2d. ; granted, by 
Henry VIII,, to the Bishop and his officers. 

An Augustine Monastery, founded, as some writers 
say, in the year 660, by Merwald, Viceroy of West 
Mercia ; or as others, with more appearance of cer 
tainty say, by Etlielred, Earl of Mercia, in the year 
909; income 90/. 10s. 2^1 yearly, now worth 1,810J. 
4s. 2cZ. ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to John Jennings. 

A Friary, not far from the south gate, founded, 
before the year 1268, by Lord Berkley ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to John Jennings. 

A Monastery of Dominicans, founded near the 
Castleyard, by Henry III., in the year 1239; granted, 
31 Henry VIII., to Thomas Bell, who made it a dra- 
pering house. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded in the suburbs without the 
north gate, by Queen Elenor, Sir Thomas Gilford and 
Sir Thomas Berkley, in the time of Henry III.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Richard Andrews and 
Nicholas Temple. 

AtMiNCHiN HAMPTON. An Alien Priory, according to 
some authors, was founded here very early, but others say, 
that this idea took rise from the fact that the manor was 
given to the Nuns or Minchins of the Holy Trinity, in Nor 
mandy, by William the Conqueror; revenues valued at 
117/. 16s. lid, now worth 2,356/. 18s. 4d.; granted, 
34 Henry VIII., to Andrews Lord Windsor. 

At HA YLES, or TRAY. A Cistercian Monastery, founded, 
in the year 1251, by Richard Earl of Cornwall, afterwards 
Kii;g of the Romans and Emperor of Germany; valua 
tion 357/. 7s. Sd. t now worth 7,147/. 14s. 2rf.; granted, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

1 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas Seymour, and after his at 
tainder, to William Marquis of Northampton, 4 Edward VI. 

AtHoRKSLEGH,orHousLEY. An Alien Priory, endowed, 
in the time of William the Conqueror, by Roger Earl ot" 
Shrewsbury ; granted, 7 Edward VI.* to Sir Walter Dennys. 
f At LAN-TONY, near Gloucester. An Augustine Monastery, 
founded, in the year 1136, by Milo Earl of Hereford, on the 
south side of the city; income 74S/. 19s. llc?., now worth 
14,979/. 19*. 2r/.; granted, 32 Henry VIIL, to Sir Arthur 
Porter. 

At LECIIELADE. An Hospital, founded, 30 Henry III., 
by Lady Isabel Ferrers; granted, 14 Elizabeth, to Denis 
Tappes. 

At NOENT, or NEWENTON. An Alien Priory, founded 
on the manor given by William the Conqueror to the Con 
vent of Cormeili in Normandy ; granted, 1 Edward VI., to 
Sir Richard Lee. 

At QUEININGTON. A Preceptory of Knights Hospitalers, 
founded through the bounty of Agnes de Lacy and her 
daughter before the reign of John; valued at 137/. 7s. l~cL 
yearly, now worth 2747 /.2s. 6d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIIL, 
to Sir Richard Morisine and to Sir Anthony Kingston. 

At STANLEY. A Benedictine Cell, founded, in the year 
1 135, by Roger Berkley ; yearly income 126J. Os, 8d., now 
worth 2520. 13s. 4d. ; granted to Sir Antony Kingston. 

AtSTOW-ON-THE-WouLD. An Hospital, founded, about 
the year 1010, by Ailmar, Earl of Cornwall and Devon 
shire ; valued at 25Z. 4s. 4d. yearly, now worth 504L 6s. Sd. 

At THEOKESBURT, or TEWKESBURY. A Benedictine 
Monastery, built and endowed by two brothers, Oddo and 
Doddp, in the year 715, but enlarged in the year 1102, by 
Robert Fitz Haimon, a noble Norman; valued at 1598Z. 
Is. 3d. yearly, now worth 31961Z. 5s. ; granted, 36 Henry 
VIIL, to Thomas Strowde, Walter Erie, and James Paget. 

At WESTBURY ON TRIN, or URYMME. A Benedictine 
Cell and College, founded in the year 824, and endowed 
with several lands by Ethelric, son of Ethelmund. Having 
suffered by wars and other convulsions it was rebuilt, in the- 
year 1288, by Godfrey GifYard, Bishop of Worcester ; va- 



LIST OF 

lued at 232/. 14s. \d. yearly, now worth 4Q54L Os. 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Sir Ralph Sadler. 

At WINCHELCOMBE. A Benedictine Monastery, or Nun 
nery, founded, 787, by King Offa; and, in 798, King 
Ranulph laid there the foundation of a stately Monastery ; 
valued at 7591. Us. 9rf. yearly, now worth 15191Z. 15s. ; 
granted, 1 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas Seymor. 



HANTS (COUNTY.) 

At SOUTH BADEISLEY. A Preceptory of Knights Tem 
plars ; valued at 118/. 16s. Id. yearly, now worth 2376. 
ils.Qd.- granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Sir Nicolas Trock- 
morton. 

At DE BELLO Loco REGIS, or BEAULIEU, in the New 
Forest. A Cistertian Abbey, founded, by King John, in the 
year 1204, for thirty monks ; income 428/. 16s. 8d. yearly, 
now worth 85761. 4s. 2d, ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to 
Thomas Wriothesley, Esq. 

AT BROMERE. An Augustin Monastery, founded, by 
Baldwin de Reveriis ; and his uncle, Hugh, in the reign of 
Henry I. ; valued at 200Z. 5s, \d. yearly, now worth 40Q5L 
2s. 6d. ; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to Henry, Marquis of 
Exeter. 

At BURTON, in the Isle of Wight. A College, founded, 
3282, by John de Insula, rector of Shalfleet, and Thomas 
de Winton, rector of Godshill ; granted, 1 8 Henry VI., to 
Winchester College. 

At HAILING. An Alien Priory, founded by King Wil 
liam, and afterwards by King Henry I. ; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII., to the College of Arundel. 

At MEREWELLE. An Augustin Priory, founded, in the 
reign of John, by Henry of Blois, Bishop of Winchester ; 
granted, 5 Edward VI., to Sir Henry Seymore. 

At MOTISFONT. An Augustin Priory, founded, by Wil 
liam Brimere, in the reign of John; valued at 167/. 15s. 8|c?. 
yearly, now worth 3355L \4s. 2c?. 3 granted, 28 Henry 
VIII.; to William, Lord Sandys. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At NETTELY, near Southampton. A Cistertian Abbey, 
founded, 1239, by King Henry III.; valued at 160Z.2s.9ic/. 
yearly, now worth 3202/. 15s. IQd. ; granted. 28 Henry 
VIIL, to Sir William Paulet. 

At PORCH ESTER. An Augustin Monastery, founded, 
1133, by King Henry I. ; valued at 314Z. 17s. lOJd. yearly, 
now worth 6297/. 17s. 6d. ; granted, 30 Henry VIIL, to 
John White. 

At PORTESMOUTII. A Hospital, founded, Jn the time 
of Jobn, by Peter de Rupibus, Bishop of Winchester; 
valued at 33Z. 19s. 5\d. yearly, now worth 6791. 9s. 2d. 

At QUARRER, in the Isle of Wight. A Cistertian Mo 
nastery, founded, 1132, by Baldwin de Redveriis, after 
wards Earl of Devonshire ; valued at 184/. Is. lOd. yearly, 
now worth 3681/. 18s. 4c?. ; granted, 36 Henry VJIL, to 
John and George Mills. 

At RUMESEY. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, 967, 
by Edward, or Ethel wold, a Saxon nobleman ; valued at 
528Z. 8s. lOJd yearly, now worth 10,568L 19s. %d.; grant 
ed, 38 Henry VIIL, to John Bellow and R. Pigot. 

At SOUTHAMPTON. An Augustin Priory, built, by 
Henry L, upon the river, two miles above the town ; valued 
at 911. 9s. yearly, now worth 1829Z. ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIIL, to Francis Dawtrey. 

An Hospital, called God s House, founded, in the 
time of Henry III., by two brothers, Gervase and Pro- 
tase, of Hampton, for the poor. 

St. Mary Magdelan Hospital, founded, 1179, for 
lepers. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded, 1240, near the wall, 

in the south part of the town ; granted 36 Henry VIIL, 

to John Pollard, and, 5 Edward VI., to Arthur Darcy. 

At TWIN HAM. An Augustin Priory, founded in the time 

of Edward the Confessor ; valued at 541 /. 16s. yearly, now 

worth 10S96J. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII,, to Joseph 

Kir ton. 

At TYCIIFIELD. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded, 
in the time of Henry III., by Peter de Rupibus, Bishop of 
Winchester; valued at 280/- 19s. 10|d yearly, now worth 



LIST or 

56197. 19s. 2c?. ; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas 
Wriothesley, who built a stately house here. 

At WJIREWELL. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, by 
Elfrjda, Queen Dowager of King Edgar, in the year 986, to 
expiate the crime of her being concerned in the murders both 
of her first husband, Ethelwolf, that she might be queen, and 
of her son-in-law, King Edward, that her own son might be 
king ; here she spent the latter part of her life in doing pe 
nance, like David, for her sins, and for regaining, like the 
prodigal child, the good graces of her heavenly Father; 
valued at 403/. 12s. lOd. yearly, now worth 8072/. 18s. 4d. ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas West lord de la 
Ware. 

At WINCHESTER. A Benedictine Priory, founded, as 
they say, by King Lucius, but destroyed in Diocletian s per 
secution, in the year 266 ; rebuilt, by Deodatus, the Abbot, 
in the year 300 ; the monks were massacred, and the house 
perverted into a temple. for the idolatrous worship of Dagon ? 
by Cerdic, King of the West Saxons, bu< finally restored by 
the Saxon Christian Kings ; value, at the suppression, 
15077. 17s. 2d. yearly, now worth 30.157/. 3sAd. 

A Nunnery, founded, in the east part of the city, by 
King Alfred ; here St. Edburg, was Abbess ; valued 
at 179/. 7s. 2d. yearly, now worth 3587/. 3s. 4d.; 
granted, 38 Henry VIII., to John Bello and John 
Broxholrne. 

A Monastery, founded, by King Alfred, for the learn 
ed Monk Grimbald, whom he had brought from Flan- 
<]ers. It was removed, 1110, to Hyde, without the 
city ; valued at S65 1 s. 6d. yearly, now worth 
1730R 10d.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Richard 
Bethel. 

St. Elizabeth College, founded, by John de Pontoys, 
Bishop of Winchester, 1300 ; valued at 112/. 17s. 4d. 
yearly, now worth 2257Z. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 35 Henry 
VIII., to Thomas, Lord Wriothesley. 

Wykeham College, founded, by the munificent pre 
late, William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester, 1387, 
outside the city to the southward ; valued at 6391. 8s. Id. 
yearly, now worth 12,788. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

St. Cross Hospital, founded, south-west of the town, 
by Henry le Blois, Bishop of Winchester, in the year 
1 132, for the whole maintenance of 13 poor brethren ia 
lodging, clothing, and diet, and for dining 100 poor 
persons every day. In the year 1185, Richard, Bishop 
of Winchester, made provision for dining another 100 
poor persons every day ; and, in the time of Henry VI., 
Cardinal Beaufort made additional provisions for a rec 
tor, two chaplains, 35 poor men, and three poor wo 
men; value, at the dissolution, lS4/. 4s. 2d. yearly, 
now worth 36341. 3s. 4d. 

An Hospital, for the poor folk, stood outside the 
King s Gate, maintained by the Monks of St. S within, 
now suppressed. 

An Augustm Friary, stood a little without the south 
gate, on the way to Hampton ; the site of this as well 
as of three other Friaries, granted. 
. Grey Friary, founded by King Henry III., close by 
the east gate, on the inside ; granted, 35 Henry VIII. 
At WINTENEY. A Cistertian Nunnery, founded, in the 

time of William the Conqueror, by the son of Peter Jeffrey ; 

valued at 591. Is. yearly, now worth 1181/. ; granted, 30 

Henry VIII., to Richard Hill, Esq., Serjeant of the King s 

Cellar. 



HEREFORD (COUNTY.) 

At ACLEY. An Alien Priory, found, in the year 1160, 
by the ancestors of Robert Chandos j granted, 33 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Philip Hobby. 

At ACORNBURY. An Augustin Nunnery, founded, by 
Margery, wife of Walter de Lacy, three miles south of 
Hereford, in the reign of King John ; valued at 151. 7s. 5\d. 
yearly, now worth 1507/.9s. 2d. ; granted, 33 Heary VIIL, 
to Hugh de Harry. 

At BBOMYARD. A College, founded prior to the reign 
of Henry III.; granted, 14 Elizabeth, to one Henry James. 

At CLIFFORD. A Cluniac Priory, founded, in the time 
of Henry I., by Simon Fitz Ricl.ard; va uei at 65L 
s 5 



LIST OF 

lls. lid. yearly, now worth 131U. 18s. 4d.; granted 7 Ed 
ward VI., to William Herbert^Earl of Pembroke. 

At DORE. A Cistertian Abbey, founded, in the time of 
King Stephen, by Robert Ewyas ; valued yearly at 1 18/. 2s. 
yearly, now worth 2362/. ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to 
John Scudamore. 

At DYNMORE. An Hospital of Knights Hospitalers, 

founded, by Sir Thomas , a brother of the order, in the 

time of Henry II. ; granted 2 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas 
Palmer. 

At FLANESFORD. An Augustin Monastery, founded, 
1347, by Richard, Lord Talbot; valued at 151. 8s. 9d. 
yearly, now worth 308. 15s. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII. , to 
George, Earl of Shrewsbury. 

At HEREFORD. A Cathedral, founded here, in the year 
680 ; again destroyed by the wars, and rebuilt by William 
the Conqueror ; valued, at the general suppression, - 8 3 II. 
4s. Id. yearly, now worth 16,624. Is. 8c?. 

A Benedictine Cell, founded here very early, but en 
larged in after times by several benefactqrs ; valued at 
12K 3s. 3rf. yearly, now worth 2423/. 5s. 10. ; grant 
ed, 34 Henry VIII., to John ap Rice. 

St. John s Hospital of Templars, stood in the su 
burbs, without the north gate ; granted, 6 Elizabeth, to 
Robert Freke and John Walker. 

A Friary, founded, in the time of Edward III., in 
the north suburbs, by Sir John Daniel ; granted, 5 Eli- 
beth, to Elizabeth Wynne. 

A Friary, founded, without the Frere-gate, by Sir 
William Pembrugge, in the time of Edward I. ; grant 
ed, 36 Henry VIII., to James Boyle. 
At KILPECKE. A Benedictine Cell, founded, about 
1134, by Hugh, the son of William the Norman; granted, 
13 Henry VIII., to the Bishop of Gloucester. 

At LEOMINSTER. A Benedictine Cell, founded, about 
660, by Merwald, King of West Mercia, but destroyed and 
-rebuilt in after times; valued at 660 J. 16s. Sd. yearly, now 
worth 13,216Z. 13s. 4d. ; granted to the Bailiffs and Bur 
gesses of the town. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At LYM BROKE. An Augustine Nunnery, founded about 
a quarter of a mile from the left bank of the river Lugg ; 
valued at 231. 17s. 8d. yearly, now worth 477/. 13s. 4d. ; 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to John West and Robert Grat- 
wick. 

At WIG MORE. An Augustin Monastery, founded, in the 
year 1100, by Ralph de Mortimer; but, for want of water 
and convenience, shifted up and down, and finally settled 
into a stately monastery, a mile beyond the town ; valued at 
302/. 12s. 3|d yearly, now worth 6052/. 5s. IQd. ; granted, 
2 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas Palmer. 

At WORAIELEY. An Augustin Abbey, founded, in the 
lime of King John, by Gilbert Talbot ; valued at 83/. 10s. 2u J . 
yearly, now worth 1670/. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., 
to Edward, Lord Clinton. 



HERTS (COUNTY.) 

At ST. ALEAN S. A Benedictine Abbey, founded, in the 
year 793, by King Otfa, for 100 monks, in honour of St. 
Alban, the first Britain who suffered martyrdom ; valued at 
2510/. 6s. l%d. yearly, now worth 50,2062. 2s. Gd. ; granted, 
7 Edward VI., to the Mayor and Burgesses, 

St. Julian s Hospital, founded, in the time of Henry 
I., by Jeffrey, the Abbot, near this town, on the London 
road, for leprous persons ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
Richard Lee. 

. At BERKHAMSTEDE. Two Hospitals stood here in the 
reign of King John, for poor lepers ; revenues granted 
36 Henry VIII. , to Robert Hordem. 

At CESTREHUNT, or CIIESTIIITNT. A Benedictine Nun 
nery, founded in the year 1183; valued at 27/. 6s. 8d. 
yearly, now worth 546Z, 13s. 4d, ; granted, 28 Henry VIII., 
to Sir Anthony Deny. 

At CLOTHALE. An Hospital of ancient foundation ; va 
lued at 4Z. 2s. Sd. yearly, now worth 822. 13. 7d. ; granted, 
2 James I. 

At DE LA PR A YE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, 



LIST OF 

in the year 1190, by Garinus, Abbot of St. Alban s; grant 
ed, 32 Henry VIII., to Ralph Rawlet, Esq. 

At TEMPLE DYNXESLEY. A Preceptory of Templars, 
richly endowed in lands, in the time of King Stephen, by 
Bernard de Balliol ; granted, by King Henry VIII., to Sir 
Ralph Sadler. 

At FLAMSTED. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, in" 
the time of Stephen, by Roger de Toney. Yearly value 
461. 165. IJdf., now worth 936/. 2s. 6d- granted 31 Henry 
VIII., to S r ir Richard Page. 

At HERTFORD. A Benedictine Abbey, founded in the 
time of William the Conqueror, by Ralph de Limesie ; 
value yearly 86Z. 14s. Sd, now worth ],734/. 13s. 4</. ; 
granted 29 Henry VIII., to Sir Antony Denny, and to his 
wife. 

At HITCIIIN. A Gilbertine Nunnery, founded at some 
early period; value yearly, at the suppression,, 151- \s. lie/., 
now worth 301/. 18s. 4cZ;_ granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
John Cokke. 

A Dominican Friary, founded, at the end of this 
town, by King Edward, about 1316; yearly value 
4/. 9s. 4d., now worth 89/. 6s. 8c?.; granted, 38 Henry 
VIII., to Edward Watson and H. Hendson. 

At KING S LANGLEY. A Friary, founded, near the royal 
palace here, by Roger Helle, an English Baron, but endowed 
by Edward I., Edward II., Edward III., and Edward IV., 
so that it exceeded all houses of the order in England ; yearly 
value loO/. 14s. Sc., now worth 3,014Z. 13s. 4c/.; granted, 
16 Elizabeth, to Edward Grimston. 

At RED BURN. A Benedictine Cell, subservient to St 
Alban s, founded before 1195; granted, 31 Henry VIII., 
to John Cock. 

At ROYSTOX. An Augustine Monastery, founded, in 
the time of Henry II., by Eustace de Merc; yearly 
value 1061. 3s. Id., now worth 3,123. 1. Sd.-, granted 
32 Henry VIII., to Robert Slete, Esq. 

St. John s Hospital", founded in the time of Henry III.; 
valued at 51. 6s. 10cZ., now worth 106/. 8s. 4d. ; 
granted, 5 James I. to R,oger Aston. 
At ROWIIEJNG, or ROWNAY. A Benedictine Nunnery, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

founded, 10 Henry II., byConan, Duke of Britain ; valued, 
at tiie dissolution, 131. 10s. 9d, now worth 270/. 1 5s. 

At SOPEWELL. A Benedictine Nunnery, built by Jeffrey, 
sixteenth Abbot of St. Alban; yearly revenues 6SI. 8s., now 
worth 1,368J. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Sir Richard 
Lee. 

At STAN BON". A Hospital of Knights Hospitalers, en 
dowed with 140 acres of lands, by Richard de Clare, before 
1180; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Sir Ralph Sadler. 

At WARE. An Alien Priory, endowed by Hugo de Gren- 
temaisnil, before 1081 ; granted by Henry VIII. 

At WYMONDESLEY PARVA. An Augtistin Hospitaf, 
built in the time of Henry III., by Richard Argentein ; 
yearly value 37Z. 10. 6|d., now worth 7501. 10s. lOd. ; 
granted, 29 Henry VIIL, to James Nedeham, surveyor of 
the king s works. 



HUNTINGDON (COUNTY.) 

AtHinciiiNGBROOKE, near Huntingdon. A Benedic 
tine Nunnery, founded by King William the Conqueror ; 
value yearly 19/. 9s. 2d., now worth 389/. 3*. 4d. ; granted, 
29 Henry VIII., to Richard Williams, alias Cromwell. 

At HUNTINGDON. An Augustin Monastery, founded, 
outside the town, by Eustace de Luvetot, in the time of 
King Stephen; yearly value 232/. 7s., now worth 4,647/. ; 
granted, 33 Henry VIIL, to Sir Richard Cromwell, alias 
Williams. 

At ST. IVES, olim Slepe. A Benedictine Cell, founded 
by Ednoth, Abbot of Ramsey, in honour of St. Ivo, whose 
relics were found here in the year 1001; granted, 36 
Henry VIIL, to Sir Thomas Audley. 

At ST. NOET S. A Benedictine Priory, founded by 
Noet, but was destroyed in the subsequent wars, and re 
stored in the year 1113 ; yearly value 2561. 13s., now worth 
5,125/. 5s.; granted 33 Henry VIIL, to Sir Richard Wil 
liams, alias Cromwell. 

At RAMSEY. A Benedictine Abbey, founded 969, by 



LIST OF 

Ailvvine, Earl of East Angles; yearly value 983Z. 15s. 3d., 
now worth 19,675/. 5s. Wd. ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to 
Sir Richard Cromwell, alias Williams. 

At SALT KEY. A Cistertian Abbey, founded 1146, by 
Simon, Earl of Northamptou ; yearly value 199/. 11s. Sd. t 
now worth 3,99 II. 13s. 4d.; granted, 29 Henry VIIL, to 
Sir Richard Cromwell, alias Williams. 

At STONELY. An Augustin Priory, founded 1180, by 
William Mandeville ; yearly value 62/. 12s. 3d, now worth 
1,252J. 5s. IQd.-, granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Oliver Leder. 



KENT (COUNTY.) 

At AYLESFORD. A Carmelite Friary, founded 1240, by 
Richard Lord Grey; granted, 33 Henry VIIL, to Sir Tho 
mas Wyat. 

At BILSINGTO^-. An Augustin Priory, founded 1253, 
by John Mansell ; valued yearly 8H. Is. 60?., now worth 
1,621 J. 10s.; granted, 30 Henry VIIL, to the Archbishop 
f Canterbury. 

At Box LEY. A Cistertian Abbey, founded 1146, by 
William de Ipre, Earl of Kent, who afterwards became a 
Monk himself, at Laon in France ; valued at 21 8 J. 19s. IQd., 
now worth 4,3797. 18s. 4d. , granted, 32 Henry VIIL to 
Sir Thomas Wyat. 

At BRADGARE. 4 College, founded, 16 Richard II., 
by Mr. Robert, Pastor of the town, and seven gentlemen ; 
granted, 29 Henry VIIL, to the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

At BRADSOLE, near Dover. A Premonstratensian Abbey, 
founded, 1191, by King Richard L; yearly value 142V. 
8s. 9d., now worth 2,848J. 15s. granted by Henry VIII. to 
the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

At BURNE, or PATRICKSBURN. An Alien Priory, 
founded 1200; granted, 4 Edward VI. to Sir Thomas 
Cheiney. -. . 

At CANTERBURY. A Cathedral Church, and Bene 
dictine Priory, founded by King Ethelbert, on his conversion 
to Christianity, in the year 600. The Cathedral was built 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

by Lanfranc, in the year 1080. Besides the great offerings 
at Thomas a Becket s shrine, the yearly revenues, at the 
dissolution, made 2,489/. 4s. 9d., now worth 49..784Z. 16s. 

St. Augustine s Monastery, founded by the same 
Convert, Ethelbert, King of Kent, by the advice of 
St. Augustine, who was buried here. The yearly 
revenues 1,274Z. 0. l/0|d., are now worth 29,480 J. 
175. 6d 

St. Gregory s Hospital, founded, in the year 1084, 
by Archbishop Lanfranc ; yearly revenues 1661. 4s. 5Jc?., 
now worth 3,328Z. 9s. 2rf.; granted, 28 Henry VIII. , 
to the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

St. Sepulchre s Nunnery, founded 1100, by Arch 
bishop Anselm, in the south east of the city; revenues 
38/. 19s. l\d., now worth 779/. 12s. 60?.; granted, 
38 Henry VIII., to James Hale. 

Eastbridge Hospital, founded, as some say, by Lan 
franc; or, as others think, by St. Thomas the Martyr, 
for the entertainment of pilgrims; yearly value 231. 
18s. 9JcZ, now worth 478/. 15s. 10c?. 

St. Laurence s Hospital, founded, south east of this 
town, in the year 1137, by Hugh, the Abbot of St. 
Augustine s; yearly revenues 31Z. 10s. 7c?., now worth 
630. 11s. 8d. ; granted to Sir John Parrot. 

St. Margaret s Hospital, founded, 1243, by Simon 
de Langton, Archdeacon of Canterbury, for poor infirm 
priests; yearly value 10Z. 13s. 8c?., now worth 213 
13s. 4d. ; granted, 13 Elizabeth, to the Mayor, &c., 
and is now a Bridewell. 

An Augustin Friary, founded, in the reign of Ed 
ward L, by Richard French, baker; granted, 33 
Henry VIII., to G. Harper. 

A Dominican Friary, founded, abaut 1221, by King 
Henry III. ; granted, 2 Elizabeth, to Thomas Wiseman, 
and then to John Harrington. 

A Franciscan Monastery, founded, 1270, by John 
Diggs, an Alderman of the city; granted, 31 Henry 
VIII., to Thomas Spilman. 

1 ^ At CUMBWELL, in the Parish of Goudhurst. An Augus- 
>tine Priory, founded by Robert de Turneham, in the reign 



LIST OF 

of Henry II.; yearly value, 80Z. 175. 6|d, now worth 
1,617/. 105. JOc?.; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to Thomas 
Culpepper, and, 34 Henry VIII., to Sir John Gage. 

At DA VINO TON. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, 
1153, by Fulk de Newenham ; yearly value 2H. 13s. 10c?., 
now worth 433J. 85. 4d. ; granted, 3 Henry VIII., to 
Sir Thomas Cheney. 

At DERTFORD. An Augustine Nunnery, founded, 1355, 
by King Edward III.; value, at the dissolution, 408Z., now 
worth 8,160/.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Edm. Mervyn, 
and finally became the property of the Earl of Salisbury. 

At DOVER. A Benedictine Priory, founded, 640, within 
the Castle, by King Eadbald, removed down into the town, 
696; yearly value 232J. Is. 5%d., now worth 4,64R 9s. 2d. 

At GREENWICH. A Dominican Friary, founded, 1376, 
by King Edward III. and Sir John Norbury. The religious 
were restored by Queen Mary twenty years after they were 
expelled by her father, but finally expelled by Elizabeth. 

At HARBALDOWJST. A Hospital, founded, about a mile 
from the west gate of Canterbury, for the poor, by Bishop 
Lanfranc; yearly value 109J. 7s. 2d, now worth 2,187J. 
3s. 4d. ; suppressed in the reign of Edward VI. 

At MONK S HORTON. A Cluniac Cell, founded, in the 
reign of Henry II., by Robert de Vere; yearly value 111/. 
16s. 11^., now worth <2,236J. 19s. 2rf. ; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Richard Tate, and after to Mantell. 

At WEST LANG DON. A Premonstratensian Abbey, 
founded, 1192, by William de Aubervill ; yearly value 
561. 6s. 9d., now worth 1126J. 15s.; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII., to the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

At LEEBES. An Augustine Priory, built, 1119, by Ro 
bert Croucheart, Knight ; yearly value 362/. 7s. 7c/., now 
7,247/. 11s. 8cZ.; granted, 4 Edward VI., to Sir Antony 
St. Leger. 

At LILLECHURCII, or HEYHAM. A Benedictine Nun 
nery, founded, 1151, by King Stephen; granted by Henry 
VIII. to Cambridge College. 

At MAIDSTONE. A College, or Hospital, founded, 1260, 
by Boniface, Archbishop of Canterbury; valuation 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

75. lOd. yearly, now worth 3,187Z. 18s. 4d. ; granted, 
3 Edward VI., to Lord Cobiiam. 

At MALLING. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, in the 
reign of William Rufus, by Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester ; 
yearly value 245/. 10s. 2\d., now worth 4,910J. 4s. 2d.; 
granted, 12 Elizabeth, to Henry Cobham, alias Brook. 

At MELTON. A Hospital, granted to Sir Henry Wyat. 

At MUTTIDEN. A Friary, founded, 1224, by Sir 
Michael de Ponynges ; yearly value 30/. 13s. O^c?., now 
worth 61 3J. Os. iOd; granted, 30 Henry VIIL, to Sir 
Antony Aucher. 

At OSPRING. A Hospital, founded, 1235, by King 
Henry III.; granted -by Henry VIII. 

At WEST PECCHAM. A Hospital of Hospitalers ; yearly 
value 631. 6s. Bd., now worth 1,266J. 13s. 4d.; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Sir Robert Southwell. 

At PUCKESHALL. A Hospital, granted by King Henry 
VII. to Lynch, his Physician ; granted to Sir John Parot. 

At ROCHESTER. A Cathedral and Benedictine Priory, 
founded, in the year 600, by King Ethelbert; yearly value 
4861. Us. 5d., now worth 9,73U. 8s. 4d. 

At SEVENOKE. Two Hospitals, one founded in the year 
1418, for twenty men and women, by William Sevenoke ; 
another in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury; both 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Archbishop Cranmer. 

At SHEFEY. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, in the 
year 675, by Sexburg, widow of Ercombert, King of Kent; 
yearly value 122/. 14s. 6%d., now worth 2,454/. 10s- 10d.; 
granted, 29 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas Cheiney. 

At NEWWORK, near Rochester. A Hospital, founded, 
in the year 1 194, by Bishop Glanville of Rochester, for the 
reception of poor travellers, and other indigent persons ; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII. 

At SWJNGFIELD, near Dover. A Hospital of Sister 
Hospitalers, founded, in the year 1190, by Sir Robert de 
Clotingham, Arnulf Cade, and others ; yearly value 88 . 
3s. S^G?., now worth 1,763/. 5s. lOd. ; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Thomas Aucher. 

At TANINGTOX. An Hospital, founded in the reign of 



LIST OF 

Henry II.; yearly value, 33Z. 11s. Id., now worth 6711. 
Is. Sd.; granted, 5 Edward VI. to Robert Dartnall. 

AtTnuRLEGii. An Alien Priory, bestowed. 22 Henry IL, 
to the Abbey of St. Bertin at St. Omers. 

At WENGIIAM. A College, founded, in the year 1286, 
by John Peckham, Archishop of Canterbury ; yearly reve 
nues 331. 6s. 8d., now worth 6661. 13s. 4<1 ; granted, 
7 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas Palmer. 

At WEST WOOD. An Augustin Priory, founded, in the 
year 1178, by Richard de Lucy, Viceroy here from the King, 
who was absent in France ; next year he quitted his great 
palaces, took the religious habit, and died in this house ; 
yearly revenues 186/. 9s., now w r orth 7^329^. ; granted, 
28 Henry Vltt, to Sir Ralph Sadler. 3 

At WYE. A College, founded, in the year 1431, by 
John Kempt, Archbishop of York; yearly value 93Z. 2s. 0|c?., 
now worth 1,862/. Os. lOd; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
Walter Buckler. 



LANCASTER (COUNTY.) 

At BURSCOUGH. An Augustin Priory, founded, in the 
reign of Richard I., by Robert Fitz Henry, Lord of Latham; 
yearly value 129J. Is. lOd, now worth 2,581Z. 16s. 8c7. 

At COCKERSAND. A Premonstratensiaix Abbey, founded, 
in the reign of Henry II., by William Lancastre ; yearly 
value 282^. 7s. l\d., now worth 5,647 Z. 12s. 6cZ.; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to John Kechin. 

At CONISHEVED. An Augustin Priory, founded, in the 
reign of Henry II., by Gabriel Pennington ; yearly value 
124Z. 2s. Id, now worth 2,482^ Is. Sd. 

At FURNES. A Cistertian Abbey, founded in the year 
1127; yearly value 966J. 7s. lOd, now worth 19,327Z. 
16s. Bd. 

At HOLAND. A Benedictine Priory, founded, in the 
year 1319, by Walter, Bishop of Litchfield ; yearly value 
78L 12s., now worth 1,572/.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to 
John Holcroft. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At HORNEBY. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded 
by the ancestors of Sir Thomas Stanley; valuation 26/. 
yearly, now worth 520Z. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII. } .to 
Lord Montegle. 

At KERSIIALL. A Cluniac Cell, bestowed by Henry II 
to the monastery of Lenton, Nottinghamshire; granted, 32 
Henry VIII., to Baldwin Willoughby. 

At KERTMEL. An Augstine Priory, founded in the year 
1188, by William Mareschall, Earl of Pembroke; yearly 
value 212/. 11s. lOd; now worth 4,251 /, 16s. 8cZ. ; granted, 
32 Henry VIIL, to John Holcroft. 

At LANCASTER. An Alien Priory, founded, in the year 
1094, by Earl Roger of Poictiers ; yearly value 90/., now 
worth 1,600J. 

A Dominican Friary, founded 44 Henry III., by 
Sir Hugh Harrington; granted, 3 Henry VIIL, to 
John Hqlcroft. 

At LYTIIOM. A Benedictine Cell, founded by Richard 
Fitz Rogers, in the reign of Richard I. ; yearly value 531. 
15s. lOd. ; now worth 1,0751. 16s. Sd.; granted to Sir 
Thomas Holcroft. 

At MANCESTER. A College, founded, 9 Henry V., by 
Thomas de la Ware, Pastor of the town ; yearly value 21 3, 
10s. lid, now worth 4&7QL 18s. 4c?. 

At PEN WORTH AM. A Benedictine Priory, founded, in 
the reign of William the Conqueror, by the bounty of 
Warine Bussel; yearly value 114/. 1 6s. 9d., "now worth 
2,296Z. 15s.; granted, 34 Henry VIIL, to John Fleetwood. 

At PRESTON. A Friary, founded, on the north-west of 
this town-, by Edmond, Earl of Lancaster, son of Henry III. ; 
granted, 32 Henry VIIL, to Thomas Holcroft. 

At WARRINGTON. An Augustin Friary, built, at the 
end of the bridge, in the year 1379; granted, 32 Henry 
VIIL, to Thomas Holcroft. 

At Locus BENEDICTUS DE WHALLEY. A Cistertian 
Abbey, founded in the year 1296 ; valued at 55 II. 4s. 6d. 
yearly, now worth 11,024/. 10s.; granted, 7 Edward VI., 
to Richard Aston and John Braddyll. 



LIST of 



LEICESTER (COUNTY.) 

At BE I/TON. An Augustine Nunnery, founded, in the 
reign of Henry III., by Rorsia de Verdon ; yearly value 
10U. 8s. 2lrf,"now worth 2,028Z. 4s. 2cZ. ; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Humphrey Foster. 

At BR ADD LEY. An Augustine Priory, founded, in the 
time of King John, by Robert Bundy ; valued at 20Z. 15s. Id. 
yearly, now worth 41 51. 11s. Sd ; granted, 29 Henry VIII,, 
to Thomas Newell, Esq. 

At BREDON. An Augustine Cell, founded, in the year 
1144, by Robert Ferrers, Earl Nottingham; valued at 251. 
8s. Id. yearly, now worth 5QQL Is. Sd. granted, 7 Edward 
VI., to John, Lord Grey. 

At BURTON LAZARS. An Hospital, founded, in the 
time of King Stephen, by Roger de Moubray ; valued at 
2651. 10s. 2-Jd. yearly, now worth 53101. 4s. 2d. ; granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to John Dudley, Lord Lisle. 

At CIIORLEY and ULVESCROFT. An Augustine Priory, 
founded, in the time of Henry II., by Blanchmain s, Earl 
of Leicester ; valued at 101. 3s. IQ^d. yearly, now worth 
2,023/. 17s. 6cL; granted to Frideswide, widow. 

At CROXTON. A Premonstatensian Abbey, founded, in 
the year 1162, by William Porcarius ; valuation, at the 
suppression, 458/. 19s. l^d. yearly, now worth, 9,179^. 
19s. 2d.-, granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Thomas, .Earl of 
Rutland. 

At DALEY. A Hospital of Knight s Templars, founded, 
it is thought, by Robert Bossu, Earl of Leicester, in the 
reign of Henry III.; yearly value 103/. 16s. !\d., now 
worth 2,076Z. 12s. 6rf. ; granted, 35 Henry VIIL, to 
Sir Andrew Nowell. 

At CASTLE DON ING TON. A Hospital, founded, in the 
reign of Henry II., or sooner, by John Lacy, Constable of 
Chester; yearly value 51. 13s. 4c?., now worth ]131. 6s. Sd. 

At GERONDON. A Cistertian Abbey, founded, in the 
year 1133, by Robert Bossu, good Earl of Leicester ; yearly 
value 186Z. 15s. 2d, now worth 3,7351. 4s. 2d. ; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Thomas, Earl of Rutland. 



ABBEYS, PKIORIES, &c. 

At HETHER. A Hospital of Knights Hospitalers, founded 
in the reign of King John ; yearly value 39 /. Is. 5c?., now 
worth 78 II. 8s. 4d. 

At HINKLEY. An Alien Priory, founded, in the year 
1173, by Robert Blanch maines, Earl of Leicester ; granted, 
34 Henry VIII., to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. 
At KERKBEY ON THE WRETHEK". An Augustin Priory, 
founded, 9 Edward II., by Roger Belter; yearly value 
1781. 7s. lOJd., now worth 3,567/. 17s. 6d. ; granted, 35 
Henry VIII., to Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy. 

At LASDA. An Augustine "Priory, founded, in the reign 
of Henry I., by Richard Basset and Maud his wife ; yearly 
value 51 OJ. 16s. 5d, now worth 10,216/. 9s. 2d. ; granted, 
31 Henry VIII., to Thomas, Lord Cromwell. 

At LANG LEY. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, in the 
reign of Henry II., by William Pontulf; yearly value 321. 
6s. 2e?., now worth 646/. 3s. 4d; granted, 35 Henry VIII., 
to Thomas Grey. 

At LEICESTER. An Augustine Monastery, founded near 
the town, in the year 1143, by Robert Bossu, Earl of Lei 
cester; yearly value 1,062Z. 0*. 4jc?., now worth 21,240/. 
7s. 6d. ; granted, 4 Edward VI., to William, Marquis of 
Northampton. 

The College of St. Mary the Less, founded, in the 
year 1107, by Robert, Earl of Mallent and Leicester ; 
yearly value 23/. 12s. lid.; now worth 472/. 1 8s. 4d. 

The College of St. Mary the Greater, founded, in 
the vear 1330, by Henry, Earl of Leicester; yearly 
value 5951. 7s. 4d., now worth 11,907/. 6s* 8d.- 9 
granted, 2 Edward VI., to John Beaumont and William 
Guyse. 

St. John s Hospital, founded prior to 123J, which 
was converted into a gaol, 31 Elizabeth. 

An Augustine Friary, granted to John Bellow and 
John Broxholm. 

A Dominican Friary, founded, in the reign of 
Henry III., by the Earl of Leicester; granted, 38 
Henry VIII., to Henry, Marquis of Dorset. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded, in the year 1265, by 
Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester ; granted 37 
Henry VIII., to John Bellow and John Broxholm. 



LIST OF 



At LUTTERWORTH. A Hospital, founded, in the reign 
of King John, by Roise de Verdon and her son; yearly value 
26/. 9s. 5d., now worth 529 J. Ss. Ad. 

At MELTON MOUBRAY. A Cluniac Cell, subject to 
the Monastery of Lewes in Sussex ; granted, 29 Henry VIII., 
to Thomas, Lord Cromwell. 

At MOUSELEY. A College, founded, 2 Edward I., by 
Sir Anketine de Martival ; yearly value 87., now worth 
340Z. 

At OSULVESTON. An Augustin Priory, founded, in the 
reign of Henry II., by *Sir Robert GnmUald ; yearly vtie 
1731. 1 8s. 9d., now worth 3,478/. 15s.; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII. , to Sir John Harrington. 

At ROTIIELEY. A Hospital of Knights Templars, en 
dowed by Henry III.; yearly value 231/. 7s. 10c?., now 
worth 4,627Z. 16s. Sd.; granted, 35 Henry VIIL, to Henry 
Cart wright. 



LINCOLN (COUNTY). 

At ALVINGHAM. A Gilbertine Priory, founded, in the 
reign of King Stephen, by Robert Cbeiney, Bishop of Lin 
coln ; yearly value 141/. 15s., now worth 2,835/. ; granted, 
5 Edward VI., to Edward Lord Clinton. 

At ASLAKEBY, A Hospital of Templars, founded, in 
the reign of Richard L, by John le Mareschal; granted, 
35 Henry VIIL, to Lord Edward ^Clinton. 

At BARDNEY. A Benedictine Abbey, founded, about 
the year 697, by the bounty of Ethelred, King of Mercia, 
who resigned his crown and became a Monk here, and 
afterwards an Abbot, until his death ; valuation 429/. 7s., 
now worth 8,587/. ; granted to Sir Robert Tirwhit. 

At BARLINGS. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded, 
in the year 1154, by Ralph de Haye; yearly value 307. 
16s. 6d.; now worth 6,556. 10s, Od. ; granted to Charles, 
Duke of Suffolk. 

At BELVOIR. A Benedictine Cell, founded, in the reign 
of William the Conqueror, by Robert de Belvedere ; yearly 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

value 1291. 17s. 6d., now worth 2,5971. IQs.Qd.; granted, 
to Thomas, Earl of Rutland, aud to Robert Tirwhit. 

At LONG BENYGTON. An Alien Priory, founded, in 
the year 1175, by Ralph de Filgeries ; granted, 34 
Henry VIII. 

At BOSTON. An Augustin Friary, founded by King 
Edward II. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to the Mayor and 
Burgesses of the town. 

A Dominican Monastery, founded prior to the year 
1288; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Charles, Duke of 
Suffolk. 

A Franciscan Monastery, founded by the Esterling 
Merchants, at an early period > granted, 37 Henry VIII., 
to the Mayor and Burgesses. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded, in the year 1300, to 
the west of the river, by Sir - > Orreby, Knight ; 
granted, 37 Henry VIII. , to the Mayor aud Burgesses 
of the town. 

At BOURN. An Augustine Priory, founded, in the year 
1138, by Baldwin Fil. Gilsberti ; yearly value 200J., now 
worth 4,000/.; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Richard 
Cotton. 

At TEMPLE BRUKR. A Hospital of Knights Templars, 
founded, prior to the year 1185 ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., 
to Charles, Duke of Suffolk; yearly value 195Z. 2s. 2jrf., 
now worth 3,902Z. 4s. %d. 

At BULLINGTON. A Gilbertine Priory, founded, in the 
reign of King Stephen, by Simon Fitzwilliam ; yearly value 
187/. 7s. 9d., now worth 3,747/. 15s. ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At BURWELL. An Alien Priory, founded by the Lords 
ofKyme; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Charles, Duke of 
Suffolk. 

At CAMERINGKAM. An Alien Priory, founded, in the 
reign of Henry II., by Richard de Haya and Maud his wife j 
granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Robert Tirwhit. 

At CATTELEY. A Gilbertine Priory, founded, in the 
reign of King Stephen, by Peter de Belingey ; yearly value 
38/. 13s. 8d., now worth 7731. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 31 Henry 
VIII., to Robert Carr of Sleford. 



LIST or 

At GOTHAM, A Cistertian Nunnery, in the reign of 
Henry I., by Alan Muncel ; yearly value 46/. 17s. 7d, 
now worth 937J. 11s. 8e/.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to 
Edward Ship with. 

At CROWLAND. A Benedictine Abbey, founded, in the 
year 716, by Ethelbald, King of Mercia. After the Re 
ligious were murdered, and the Monastery burned, by the 
Danes, in the year 870, King Edred restored the lands, in 
the year 948, and rebuilt the house. Yearly value 1,2177. 
5s. lid., now worth 24,3457. 18s. 4d. , granted, 4 Edward 
VI., to Edward, Lord "Clinton. 

At DEPING. A Benedictine Cell, founded, in the year 
1139, by Baldwin Fil. De Gilsberti; granted, 32 Henry 
VIII., to the Duke of Norfolk. 

At EGLE. An Hospital of Knights Templars, founded 
by King Stephen ; yearly value 144/. 18s. l6d., now worth 
2,898/. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Thomas Earl 
of Rutland, and Robert Tirwhit. 

At ELLESHAM, or AILESHAM. An Augustine Priory, 
founded in the year 1166, by Beatrix de Amundevill, for 
several poor brethren ; yearly value 837. 17s. 10d., now worth 
1,677/. \6sAd. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Charles Duke 
of Suffolk. 

At the PRIORY IN THE WOOD, near Epp worth, in the Isle 
of Axholm. A Carthusian Priory, founded, 19 Richard II., 
by Thomas Moubray, Earl of Nottingham ; yearly value 
290/. 11s. 7d. t now worth 5,8 1U. 12s. bd. ; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Mr. John Candish. 

At FOSSE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the reign 
of John, by the inhabitants of Torkeysy ; yearly value 
SI. 5s. 4d., now worth [651. 6s. Sd.; granted, 5 Edward VI., 
to Edward Lord Clinton. 

At GOKWELLE. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in tn e 
year 1 185, by William de alta ripa; yearly value 19/. 18s. 6d., 
now worth 398 J. 10s. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Sir Wil 
liam Tirwhit. 

At GRANTHAM. A Franciscan Friary, built in the year 
1290 ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Robert Bocher, and 
David Vincent. 

At GREENFIELD. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

the year 1153, by Eudo de Greinesby, and Ralph his Son ; 
yearly value 791. 15s. la?., now worth 1.595/. Is. Sd. 
granted, 12 Elizabeth, to Sir Henry Stanley and Lord 
.Strange. ^ 

At GRIMESBY. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded before 
the year 1185; yearly value 12/. 3s. 7d., now worth 243J. 
11s. Sd. ; granted 34 Henry VIII. 

An Augustine Friary, founded prior to the year 
1304; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Augustine Porter 
and John Bellew. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the reign of Ed 
ward IT. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to John Bellew 
and Robert Brokesby. 

At HAGH. An Alien Priory, founded in the year 1164, 
by Henry II. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to John Lord 
Russel. 

At HAGHAM. An Alien Priory, founded by Hugh Earl 
of Chester ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to John Bellew and 
J. Broxholm. 

At HAGNEBY. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in 
the year 1175, by Herbert de Orreby, and Lady Agnes his 
wife; yearly value 98Z. 7s. 4d. ; now worth 1,967Z. 6s. Sd. ; 
granted, 30 Henry VIII., to John Freeman, of London. 

At HAVPRHOLM. A Gilbertine Priory, founded in the 
year 1137, by the Bishop of Lincoln, Alexander; yearly 
value 88/. 5s. 5c?., now worth ],765/. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to Lord Clinton. 

At HEYNINGES. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in the 
year 1180, by Reyner Evermere ; yearly value 58Z. 13s. 4d. t 
now worth l,173/. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Sir 
Thomas Henneage. 

At HOLLANDBRIDGE. A Gilbertine Priory, founded in 
the reign of King John, by Godwin, a Citizen of Lincoln ; 
yearly value 51. Is. lie?., now worth 10H. 18s. 4d. ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to Edward Lord Clinton. 

At HUMBERSTEYN. A Benedictine Monastery, founded 
in the reign of Henry II., by William Hermeri ; yearly value 
42/. 11s. 3d., now worth 85U. 5s. ; granted, 5 Edward VI., 
to John Cheke, Esq. 

At HYRST. An Augustine Cell, founded in the reign of 



LIST OF 

Henry I., by Nigel de Albini ; yearly value 71. Us. 8d., now 
worth 151 1. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 1 Edward VI., to John Earl 
of Warwick. 

At IRFORD. A Premonstratensian Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of Henry II., by Ralph de Albini ; yearly value 
141. 13s. 4d. ; now worth 2931. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 31 Henry 
VIII., to Robert Tirwhit. 

At KIRKSTED. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1139, by Hugh Britto; yearly value 3381. 13s. lld., 
now worth 6,673Z. 19s. 2d. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to 
Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At KYME. An Augustine Priory, founded in the reign 
of Henry IL, by Philip de Kyme; yearly value 138Z. 9s. 4<i, 
now worth 2,7 69J. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to 
Thomas Earl of Rutland, and Robert Tirwhit. 

At LEKEEURTST. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in the 
year 1 150, by Robert Fitz Gilbert ; yearly value 571. 1 3s. 5|rf., 
now worth 1,153Z. 9s. Id. ; granted," 32 Henry VIII., to 
Thomas Henneage. 

At LEMBURGH MAGNA. An Alien Priory, founded in 
the reign of Henry II., by Richard de Humet; granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to John Bellew and others. 

At LINCOLN. A Cathedral, founded in the reign of 
William the Conqueror, by Remigius, Bishop of Dorchester ; 
the Bishop s revenue, 1,962/. l7sAd. ; the Chapter s, 5751. 
8s. 2e?.; both sums would make now 50,765/. 10s. 10c?. 

A Gilbertine Priory, in the south west suburbs; yearly 
value 270 J. Is. 3d., now worth 5,40 II. 5s.; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

A Benedictine Cell, founded by Henry II. ; yearly 
value 26Z. Is. 3d, now worth 52R 5s.; granted 37 
Henry VIII., to John Bellew and John Broxholm. 

The Holy Innocent s Hospital, founded by Remigius, 
Bishop of Lincoln, for leprous persons ; granted, 7 Ed 
ward VI., to Sir William Cecil. 

An Augustine Monastery, founded, prior to the year 
1291, south side the city; granted, 37 Henry VIII., 
to John Bellew and John Broxholm. 

A Dominican Friary, in the east of the City; granted, 
37 Henry VIII., to John Bellew and John Broxholm. 



ABBEYS, PRIORI.ES, &c. 

A FranciscanFriary,fotmded in the year 1230, by Wm. 

de Beningworth ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to J. Pope. 

The White Friary, in High-street, founded by Odo 

of Kilkenny, Ireland, in the year 1269; granted, 

36 Henry VIII., to John Broxholm. 

At LOUTH PARK. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1139, by Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln ; yearly value 
1691. 5s. 6d., now worth 3,3857. 10s. 10c7.; granted, 
12 Elizabeth, to Sir Henry Stanley. 

At MARKEBY. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
reign of John, by Ralph Fitz Gilbert ; yearly value 1637. 
17s. 6d., now worth 3,2777. 10s. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., 
to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At MINTING. An Alien Priory, founded in the year 
1129, by Ranulph de Meschines; granted 34 Henry Vill. 

At NEUBO. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1198, by Richard de Malebisse ; yearly value 11 51. 
Us. 8d., now worth 2,2117. 13s. 4cL; granted, 29 Henry 
VIII., to Sir John Markam. 

At NEUS, or NEWIJOUSE. A Premonstratensian Abbey, 
founded in the year 1 143, by Peter de Gousel , yearly value 
1147. Is. 4Jd., now worth 2,2817. 7s. 6d.; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 
, At NEWSTEDE ON ALCOLM. A Gilbertine Priory, 
granted within the bounds of Cadney, by Henry II.; 
yearly value 557. Is. 8c7., now worth 1,1017. 13s. 4c?.; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Robert Henneage. 

At NEWSTEDE. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
reign of Henry III., by William de Albini; yearly value 
427. Is. 3d., now worth 8417. 5s. ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., 
to Richard Manners. 

At NOCTOX. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
reign of King Stephen, by Robert D Arcey ; yearly value 
527. 19s. 2|d., now worth 1,0597. 4s. 2c7.; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Charles Duke . of Suffolk; and 12 Eliza 
beth, to Sir John Stanley. 

At NORTHOMERSBY. A Gilbertine Priory, founded in 
the reign of King Stephen, by William Earl of Albemarle ; 
yearly value 987., now worth 1,9607.; granted, 31 Henry 
VIII., to Robert Henneage. 

T 2 



LIST OF 

At REVESBY. A Cistercian Monastery, founded, in the 
year 1142, by William, Earl of Lincoln; valued at 3491. 
4s. lOd. yearly, now worth 6,988/. 18s. 4d. ; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Charles, Duke of Suffolk. 

At SEMPRINGIIAM. A Gilbertine Priory, founded in 
the year 1139, by Sir Gilbert, of Sempringham; valued at 
3591. 125. Id. yearly, now worth 7,192/. 11s. Sd. ; granted, 
30 Henry VIII , to Edward, Lord Clinton. 

At Si XH ILL. A Gilbertine Priory, founded by 

Grelle; valued at 170Z. 8s. 9d. yearly, now worth 3,408 J. 
15s. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Thomas Henneage. 

At SKIRBEKE. A Hospital, founded for ten poor per 
sons, in the year 1130, by Sir John Multon : the Knights 
Hospitalers settled there; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to 
Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At SPA L DING. A Benedictine Monastery, founded by 
Thorold de Buckenhale, in the year 1052 ; valued at 878J. 
18s. 3d. yearly, now worth 17,578Z. 5s.; granted, 3 Ed 
ward VI., to Sir John Cheke. 

At SPILLESBEY. A College, founded, 12 Edward III., 
by Sir John Willoghby; granted, 4 Edward VI., to the 
Duchess of Suffolk. 

At STANFELD. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
leign of Henry II.. by Henry Percy; valued at 112Z. 5s. 
yearly, now worth 2,245J. ; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to Ro 
bert Tirwhit. 

At STANFORD. A Benedictine Cell, or Nunnery, found 
ed in the reign of Henry II., by William, Abbot of Peter- 
burgh ; valued at 7SZ. 1 8s. 10 jd. yearly, now worth 1,5781. 
.17s. 6d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Richard Cecil. 

Benedictine Cell, dedicated to St. Leonard ; valued 
at 37/. 17s. yearly, now worth 757/. ; granted, 5 Ed 
ward VI., to Sir William Cecil ; it is now a farm-house 
^belonging to the Earl of Exeter, under the name of St. 
Cuthbert s fee. 

Augustine Friary, in the west of the town, founded, 
before the year 1340, by the Archdeacon of Richmond ; 
granted, 6 Edward VI., to Edward, Lord Clinton. 

Dominican Friary, founded on the east of the town, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

before the year 1240; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to 
Robert Bocher and David Vincent. 

Franciscan Convent, founded 48 Edward III.; 
granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At STYKESWOLD. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of King Stephen, by the Countess Lucy ; valued 
at \63L Is. 2Jd. yearly, now worth 3,26U 4s. 2d. ; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Robert Dighton. 

At SWINSHED. A Cistercian Monastery, founded in the 
year 1 134, by Robert de Griesley ; valued at 1751. 19s. IQd. 
yearly, now worth 3,5191. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 6 Edward VI., 
to Edward, Lord Clinton. 

At TATESIIALE. A College, founded 17 Henry VI., by 
Sir Ralph Cromwell; valued at 348/. 5s. lie?, yearly, now 
worth 6,965Z. 18s. 4d. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Charles 
Duke of Suffolk. 

At THORXETON UPON THE HUMBER. An Augustine 
Priory, founded in the year 1139, by William Earl of Al- 
bemarle ; valued at 730?. 17s. 2JcZ. yearly, now worth 
14,61 71 4s. 3d. ; granted, 1 Edward VI., to the Bishop of 
Lincoln. 

At THORXHOLM. An Augustine Priory, founded by 
King Stephen ; valued at 155/. 19s. 6d. yearly, now worth 
3119J. 10s.; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Charles Duke 
of Suffolk. 

At TORKESEY. An Augustine Priory, built by King 
John; valued at 27Z. 2s. Sd. yearly, now worth 542. 
13s. 4d. ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Sir Philip Hobby. 

At TUPHOLM. A Premonstratensian Monastery, founded 
in the reign of Henry II., by Alan de Nevill and Gilbert 
his brother ; valued at 1 19/. 2s. Sd. yearly, now worth 2,382 J. 
13s. 4ef. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas Hen- 
neage. 

At VAUDEY. A Cistercian Monastery, founded in the 
year 1147, by William Earl of Albemarle ; valued at 1777. 
15s. 7jc?, yearly, now worth 3,5551. 12s. 6d. ; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At WELLOW. An Augustine Priory, founded by King 
Henry I. ; valued at 152Z. 7s. 4d yearly, now worth 3047 j. 
6s. Sd. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas lienneage. 



LIST OF 

At WILLESFORD. An Alien Priory, founded in the 
reign of King Stephen, by Hugh de Evermue ; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At WILEKETONE. An Hospitaler s House, founded in 
the reign of King Stephen, by Roger de Buslei ; valued at 
1741. 11s. \\d. yearly, now worth 349 II. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 
37 Henry VIII., to John Cock and John Thurgood. 

At WITH AM. A Templar s Hospital, founded in the 
year 1164, by Hubert de Ria and Margaret de Perci ; 
granted, 5 Elizabeth, to Stephen Holford. 



MIDDLESEX (COUNTY). 

At HERMONDESWORTH. An Alien Priory; granted, 
1 Edward VI., to Sir William Paget. 

At HOUNSLOW. A Trinitarian Friary, founded for 
the redemption of captives, 3 Edward I. ; valued at 80J. 
15s. OJeZ. yearly, now worth 1,615/. Os. 10c?. ; granted to 
William Lord Windsor. 

At KYLBURN. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
reign of Henry I., by the Convent of Westminster ; valued 
at 121 J. 16s. yearly, now worth 2,436^. ; granted, 1 Edward 
VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

In LONDON. St. Paul s Cathedral, founded in the year 
604, by Bishop Mellitus : rebuilt, 961, by JElfstan ; burnt, 
1666; rebuilt, 1675; yearly revenues 1,8551. 15s. llfd, 
now worth 17,1 15/. 19s. 2d. 

St. Bartholomew s Priory, founded in the year 1123, 
by Rayere ; valued at 7671. 8s. 4=d. yearly ; now 
worth 15.148/. 7s. 6d. ; granted, 1 Elizabeth, to Lord 
Rich. 

Charter-House, founded in the year 1349, by Sir 
Walter de Manny, without West Smithfield Bars ; 
valued at 736/. 2s. Id. yearly, now worth 14,7227. 
Us. 8c?.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas 
Audley. 

Christ Church, within Aldgate, founded by Queen 
Maud, in the year 1108 ; granted, 23 Henry VIII., to 
Sir Thomas Audley, Speaker of the House of Commons. 



ABBEYS, PKJ.ORIES, &c. 

Clerkenwell Monastery, founded in the year 1100, 
by Robert, a Priest; valued at 282J. I6s.5d. yearly, 
now worth 5,656Z. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., 
to Walter Hanley and John Williams, Knight. 

Eastminster, New Abbey, founded east of the Tower 
of London, by King Edward III., "in the year 1349; 
revenues at the dissolution 602/. lls. lOJc?., now 
worth 12,051Z. 17s. 6d. ; the site granted, 34 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Arthur Darcy, on which Tower-hill now 
stands. 

At ELSING SPITTLE, near Cripplegate. A College, 
founded in the year 1329, by William Elsing, of London ; 
valued at 239/. 13s. 1 Id. yearly, now worth 4,793Z. 18s. 4d. ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to John Williams, master of the 
King s jewels ; but it was burnt on the following Christmas 
eve, as he was living in it. 

At HALIWELL. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the year 1127, by Robert Fitz More ; yearly revenues 347 /. 
Is. 3d., now worth 6,94U 5s. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
.William Webb. 

At ST. HELEN S. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded 
in the year 1210, by William Fitz Williams; revenues 
yearly 376/. 6s., now worth 7,526/. ; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Richard Cromwell. 

St. James s Chapel on the Wall, founded near the 
wall, as early as the time of Richard I., corner of 
Monkwell-street ; granted, 34 Henry VIII. , to William 
Lamb, cloth -maker, from whom it was called Lamb s 
Chapel. 

St. John of Jerusalem, founded near West Smith- 
field, by Jordan Briset, in the year 1100; valued at 
2,385/. 12s. Sd. yearly, now worth 47,712/. 13s. 4c/.; 
suppressed 1 Elizabeth. 

The Minories, or Nunnery of the ladies of St. Clare, 
founded by Blanch Queen of Navarre, in the year 1293, 
in the street leading from the Tower to Aldgate ; yearly 
revenues 342/. 5s. lOjd., now worth 6,845/. 18s. 4d. ; 
granted, 6 Edward VI., to Henry Duke of Suffolk. 

Barking Chapel, within the Church of Allhallows, 



LIST OF 

Barking, founded by King Richard I.; suppressed, 
2 Edward VI. 

Holmes College, founded by Chancellor Holmes , in 
the year 1395, near the north door of the Cathedral of 
St. Paul ; granted, 2 Edward VI., to John Hulson and 
W. Pendred. 

London, or Guild Hall College, founded in the 
Chapel of St. Mary Magdalen, by Adam Francis and 
Henry Frowick, in the year 1368; yearly revenues 
121. 18s. 9c/., now worth 258/. 15s.; granted, 4 Ed 
ward VI., to the Mayor and Corporation of London. 

St. Martin-le-Grand, within Aldersgate, founded 
about the year 700, by Victred, or Wicthred, King of 
Kent; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to the Dean and 
Chapter of Westminster. 

t. Micnaei, Crooked-Jane, founded about the 
year 1380, by William Walworth, Mayor of London ; 
granted to George Cotton and Thomas Reeves. 

Poultney College, founded in the year 1332, by Sir 
John Poultney; yearly revenues 97/., now worth 1,940Z. ; 
granted, 1 Edward VI., to John Cheke, and Osbert 
Mountford, and Thomas Gawdy. 

Whitingdoh College, or Hospital, in the Church of 
St. Michael Royal, founded in the year 1424, by Sir 
Richard Whitingdon, Mayor of London ; yearly reve 
nues 20/. Is. 8d., now worth 40 II. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 
2 Edward VI., to Armigel Wade. 

St. Antony s Hospital, on the west of Threadneedle- 
Street, given by King Henry III. to the Brethren of 
St. Antony ; yearly revenues 551. 6s. 8d., now worth 
1,106/. 13s. 4d. 

St. Bartholomew s Hospital, founded in Smithfield, 
by a Courtier of King Henry I., for sick persons and 
women in labour, and for the maintenance of the or 
phans, until the age of seven, whose mothers died in 
the Hospital; yearly revenues 37 II. 1 3s. 2c?., now 
worth 7,433Z. 3s. 4d. 

St. Giles* College, for leprous persons, founded by the 
charitable Maud, Queen of Henry I.; granted 36 
Henry VIII., to John Lord Dudley. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

St. Catherine s Chapel, near the Tower, founded 
in the year 1148, by Maud, Queen of King Stephen ; 
yearly revenues 315/. 14s. 2e?., now worth 6,314J. 
3s. 4d. 

St. Mary Spittle, without Bishopsgate, a Priory, 
founded in the year 1 197, by Walter Fitz Ealdred ; 
yearly revenues 5571. 14s. 10d., now worth 11,154/. 
17s. 6d. granted, 34 Henry VIII. , to Stephen Vaughan. 

Rouncivall Hospital, on the south side of the Strand, 
between York-Buildings and Northumberland-house, 
founded by William Mareschall, Earl of Pembroke, 
in the time of Henry III. ; granted, 3 Edward VI., to 
Sir Thomas Cawarden. 

Savoy Hospital, near the Strand, founded by Henry 
VII., iji-the year 1505, for 100 poor people ; yearly re- 
vealies 5291. 5s. l\d., now worth 10,585/. 12s. 6d. ; 
suppressed 7 Edward VI. 

Almshouses in Staining-lane, ten in number, found 
ed near Haberdasher s Hall, by Thomas Huntlow, for 
the poor of that Company, in the year 1539. 

St. Thomas of Aeon, an Hospital, founded on the 
north side of Cheapside, by Thomas Fitz Theobald and 
.his wife, sister to St. Thomas, in the reign of Henry 
II. ; yearly revenues 300/, now worth 6,0001. ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to the Mercers Company. 

Augustine Monastery, founded on the west side of 
Broad -street, London, by Humphry Bohun, Earl of 
Hereford, in the year 1253 ; valued at 57/. Os. 5d. 
yearly, now worth 1,140/. 8s. 4d. ; granted, in the year 
1550, to John a Lasco, as a preaching-house for his 
congregation of Walloons, and still continues a Dutch 
house. 

Black Friar s Monastery, founded about the year 
1221, near Holborn, in Chancery-lane; yearly revenues 
104J. 15s. Id., now worth 2,095/. 11s. 8rf. ; granted to 
Thomas Cawarden. 

Grey Friars, or Franciscan Abbey, founded near 
Newgate, about the year 1224, by John Ewin and 
others; yearly revenues 327. 19s. 10c/., now worth 
6591. 17s. 6d.; granted 38 Henry VIII. 
T 5 



LIST OF 

Carmelite Friary, founded, on the south side of 
Fleet-street, between New Temple and Salisbury- 
court, by Sir Ricbard Gray ; yearly revenue 62/. 7s. 3d., 
now worth l,247/.5s. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to 
Richard Moresyne and William Butts. 

Holy Cross Friary, founded near Tower-hill, in the 
year 1298, by Ralph Hosier and William Soberns; 
yearly revenue 521. 13s. 4c?., now worth 1,053. 6s. 8d, ; 
granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas Wyat. 
At RISELIPP. An Alien Priory, founded in the reign 
of William the Conqueror, by Ernulph de Heding j yearly 
revenue 18/., now worth 360 J. ; granted, 16 Henry VIII. 

At STI- ATFOIID. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of William the Conqueror, by William Bishop of 
London; yearly revenue 121 1. 16s., now worth 2,436. ; 
granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Ralph Sadler. 

At SYON. A Brigitine Nunnery, founded in the year 
1414, by King Henry V. ; yearly revenue 1,944/. 11s. 8%d,, 
now worth 38^891 /. 14s. <2d. ; granted, 7 Edward VI., to John 
Duke of Northumberland. 

Syon, or Brentford Hospital, founded in- the east 
end of the town, 25 Henry V.^by John Summerset, 
Chancellor of the Exchequer ; . granted, 1 Edward VI., 
to Edward Duke of Summerset. 

At WESTMINSTER. A Benedictine Abbey, founded on 
the ruins of the Temple of Apollo, by King Lucius ; rebuilt 
in the year 610, by the Saxon King Sebert ; destroyed in 
the Danish wars ; restored by King Ethelbert and Dunstan 
Bishop of London, in the year 958 ; and largely endowed 
by King Edward the Confessor ; yearly revenue 3977 
6s. 4d., now worth 79,546/. 7s. 6d. 

St. Stephen s Chapel, founded in the year 1347, by 
King Edward III. ; rents 1,085J. 10s. 5d., now worth 
21, 7 10 J. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 6 Edward VI., to Sir John 
Gate. 

St. James* Hospital, founded before the conquest, 
for 14 leprous women; on or near it is built St. 
James Palace; yearly value 100/., now worth 2,OOOJ. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



MONMOUTH (COUNTY). 

At ABERGAVENNY. A Benedictine Priory, founded ia 
the reign of William the Conqueror, by Hamelin Balon j 
rents 591. 4s., now worth 1 ; 184/.; suppressed, 

At GOLDCLIFF. An Alien Priory, founded in the year 
1113,byRobertdeChandos; valued at 144 . ISs. Id. yearly, 
now worth 2,898/. Is. 8rf. 

At GiiACE-DiEU, or STOW. A Cistercian Abbey, built 
in the year 1226, by Sir John of Mon mouth; rents 26. 
Is. 4d., now worth 521Z 6s. Bd. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., 
to Thomas Herbert and William Bretton. 

At ST. KENMERCY. A Priory, founded prior to 1291 ; 
valued at 8/. 4s. Sd., now worth 164/. 13$. 4d. 

At LLANHODEXEI, orLANTONY. An Augustine Priory, 
founded before the year 1108, by Hugh Lacy ; valued at 
711. 3s. Zd. yearly, now worth 1423Z.3s. 4d. ; granted, 38 
Henry VIII., to Nicholas Arnold. 

At LLAISTGKYWAN. An Allen Priory, founded in the 
year 1183 ; granted, 37 Henry VIII. , to John Doyley and 
John Scudamore. 

At LLANTARXAM. A Cistercian Monastery, with the 
yearly revenue of 71Z. 3s. 2d., now worth 1,423/. 3s. 4c?. ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to John Parker. 

At MALPAS. A Cluniac Cell, founded in the reign of 
Henry I., by Winebald de Baeluna ; rents 15/. 6s. 8c?., 
DOW worth 306/. 13s. 4c?. ; granted, 1 Edward VI., to Sir 
William Herbert. 

At MONMOUTH. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the 
reign of Henry I., by Wihenoc of Monmouth ; rents 561. 
Is. llc?.,^ now worth 1,12R 18s. 4d. } granted to Richard 
Price and Thomas Perry. 

At NEWPORT. A Friary stood by the Key, beneath the 
Bridge; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Sir Edward Cam. 

At STROGUIL. An Alien Priory, founded in the reign 
of King Stephen, stood here; rents, at the dissolution, 
32/. 4s., now worth 644J. 



LIST OF 

At TIN TERN. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1131, by Walter de Clare ; rents 2561. 1 Is. 6$., now worth 
5,131Z. I Os ; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to Henry Earl of 
Worcester. 

At USK. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded before the 
the year 1236; rents 69 /. 9s. 8 c?., now worth 1>389/. 13s. 4d. r 
granted, 36 Henry VIII. , to Roger Williams. 



NORFOLK (COUNTY). 

At ALDEBY. A Benedictine..Cell, founded in the reign 
of Henry I., by Bishop Herbert. 

At ATTELBURGII. A College, founded 7 Henry IV., 
by Sir Robert Mortimer; rents 211. 16s. Q~d., now worth 
4361. Qs. lOcf; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Robert Earl 
of Sussex. 

At BEESTON. An Augustine Priory, founded in the reign 
of Henry III., by Lady Margery de Cressy ; yearly value 
50/. 6s. 4c?., now wortj 1,006J. 7s. 6d. , granted 37 
Henry VIII., to Sir Edmond Windham and Giles Seafoule. 

At BEK HOSPITAL. An Hospital, founded in the reign 
of Henry I., by William de Bek, on the great road from 
Norwich to Walsingham, with thirteen beds and night s 
lodging for poor travellers ; granted to Sir John Parrot. 

At ST. BENNET S OF HULME. A Benedictine Abbey, 
founded in the year 800, by Prince Horn, in this solitary 
place, for Hermits; yearly value 677Z. 9s. SJc?. ; now worth 
13,549J. 14s. 2d. ; granted, 27 Henry VIII., to the Bishop 
of Norwich. 

At BIN HAM. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the reign 
of Henry I., by the Nephew of William the Conqueror; 
yearly value 1601. Is., now worth 3,20H.; granted, 33 
Henry VIII. , to Thomas Paston, Esq. 

At BLACKBOROUGH. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded 
in the reign of Henry II., by Roger de Scales ; yearly value 
76J. 3s. 9%d.. now worth 1,523J. 15s. Wd. ; granted, 
4 Edward VI., to the Bishop of Norwich and his suc 
cessors. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At BLAKENEY. A Carmelite Monastery, founded 24 
Edward I., by Richard Stomer and others; granted, 33 
Henry VIII., to William Rede. 

At BROMEHILL. An Augustine Priory, founded about 
the year 1528, granted to the Fellows of Christ s College, 
Cambridge, by Edward VI. 

At BROMIIOLM. A Cluniac Priory, founded in the year 
1113, by William de Glanvill ; yearly value 144J. 19s. 0e?., 
now worth 2,899J. 0. lOcf.; - granted, 37 Henry VIII. to 
Thomas Wood house. 

At OLDBUCKENIIAM. An Augustine Priory, founded 
in the reign of King Stephen, by William de Albini Earl of 
Chichester ; rents 131/. 11 s., now worth 2,63 1/.; granted 
to Sir Thomas Lovel). 

At BURN ii AM NORTON. A Carmelite Monastery, 
founded in the year 1241, by Sir Ralph de Hemenhale ; 
yearly value 27. 5s. 4c?,, now worth 85/. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to William Lord Cobham. 

At CARBROKE. A House of Knights Hospitalers, 
founded in the reign of Henry II., by Maud Countess of 
Clare; yearly value 65/. 2s. 1 1 d. , now worth 1,302/. 18s.4c?.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Sir ^Richard Gresham and Sir 
Richard Southwell. 

At CASTLE ACRE. A Cluniac Priory, founded before the 
year 108-5, by William Warren, Earl of Surrey ; yearly 
value 3241. 17s. 5d., now worth 6,497/. 9s. 2d.; granted, 
29 Henry VIII., to Thomas Duke of Norfolk. 

At COSTRE, by YARMOUTH. A College, founded in 
the reign of Edward I., by Sir John Falstaff; yearly value 
2/. 13s. 4d. ; now worth 53Z. 6s. Sd. 

At CHOSELL. A Lazarite Monastery, founded before 
the time of Edward I., by Earl Giftard ; yearly value 13/. 
18s. 2rf v now worth 276J. 3s. 4d ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., 
to Sir John Dudley Viscount Lisle. 

At COKESFORD. Augustine Canons, established in the 
reign of King Stephen, by William Cheny; yearly value 
1531. 7s. Id., now worth 3,067/. Is. Sd.; granted, 29 
Henry VIII., to Thomas Duke of Norfolk. 

At CRABHOUSE. An Augustine Nunnery, founded in the 
south of the parish of Wigenhale, in the year 1181, by the 



LIST OF 

Convent of Reynham; yearly value 31Z. 16s. 7d, now 
worth 6361. lls. Sd. ; granted to Sir John Gage. 

At WEST DEREHAM. A Premonstratensian Abbey, 
founded in the year 1188, by Hubert Bishop of Salisbury; 
yearly value 252Z. 12s, HJt/., now worth 5,0521. 19s. 2c?.; 
granted, 31 Henry yill., to Thomas Dereham. 

At FIELDALLYNG. An Alien Priory, built in the reign 
of Henry II., by Maud de Harscolye ; granted to Martin 
Hastings and James Borne. 

At FLITCH AM. An Augustine Cell, given in the reign of 
Richard I. to Dametta de Flicham ; yearly value 621. 1 Os. 
6d.. now worth 1,250Z. 10s. lOd. ; granted, 30 Henry VIIL, 
to Edward Lord Clinton. 

At HAMPTON. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
time of Henry I., by Roger de St. Martins; rents 39/. Os. 9e?., 
now worth 780/. 15s.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Sir 
William Fermer. 

At HERINGLEY. An Hospital de Dieu, founded in the 
year 1475, by Hugh Attefenne ; yearly value 23/. 6s. 5d. 9 
now worth 465/. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIIL, to Sir 
Thomas Clere. 

At HICKLING. An Angustin Priory, founded in the 
year 1185, by Theobald de Valentia ; yearly value 137/. 
Os. IJd., now worth 2,7407. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 37 Henry 
VIIL, to the Bishop of Norwich, and his successors. 

At HITCH AM. A Cluniac Cell founded in the time of 
William Rufus, by William Warren, Earl of Surrey; 
granted, 29 Henry VIIL, to Thomas Duke of Norfolk. 

At HOIISHAM. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the 
year 1105, by Robert Fitzwalter; rents 193/. 2s. 3d., now 
worth 3,864Z. 5s. 10d; granted, 35 Henry VIIL, to Sir 
Edward Elrington. 

p| At IN GUAM. A College for the redemption of Captives, 
founded in the year 1360, by Sir Miles Stapleton ; yearly 
value 74/. 2s. 7^., now worth 1,482 J. 12s. 6d.; granted, 
36 Henry VIIL, to the Bishop of Norwich. 

At LANGLEY. A Premonstratensian Abbey, built in the 
year 1198, by Robert Fitz Roger; rents 128/. 19s. 9M; 
now worth 2,5791. 15s. 10d.; granted, 38 Henry VIIL, to 
John Berney. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At LYNN E. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the year 
1100, by Bishop Herbert. 

St. John s Hospital, founded in the reign of Edvv. {.; 
yearly value 7/. 65. lie?., now wort Ji 146/. 18s. 4c?. 
St. Mary Magdalen s Hospital, founded 1145. 
An Augustine Monastery, founded in the reign of 
Edward I.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John Eyer; 
yearly value II. 4s. 6d., now worth 24/. 10s. 

A Dominican Friary, founded, 21 Edward I., by 
Thomas Gedney; valued at 18s. yearly, now worth 
18/. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John Eyer. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded in the year 1264, by 
Thomas de Feltsham ; granted to John Eyer. The 
steeple stands as a sea mark. 

White Friar s House, founded in the year 1269, by 
some Noblemen ; yearly value H. 15s. 8c/., now worth 
35/. I3s.4d. 

At MARHAM. A Cistercian Nunnery, endowed in the 
year 1251, by the Co untess of Arundel ; yearly value 42 . 
4s.7d, now worth 844/, 12s. 6d. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., 
to Sir Nicholas Hare and Robert Hare. 

At MASSINGHAM MAGNA. X An Augustine Priory, 
founded in the year 1260, by Nicholas de Syre ; granted to 
Sir Thomas Gresham. 

At MODXEY. A Benedictine Cell, in the parish of Hel- 
gay; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Robert Hogan. 

At MONTE Jovis, or MOUNTJOY. An Augustine Priory, 
founded in the reign of King John, by William de Gisnetto. 
At NEWBRIDGE. A Hermit s Chapel, built in the year 
1373; rents 3/. 7s. 6d. ; now worth 67/. 10s. 

At NORWICH. A Cathedral and Benedictine Priory ; 
built in the year 1094, by Herbert Bishop of Thetford . 
The revenues of the bishoprick were valued at 1,050Z. 1 7s. 6d. 
and of the convent 1,061Z. 14s. 3d. yearly; both sums now 
worth 42,25K 15s. IQd. The estates granted, 27 Henry 
VIII., to the Bishops of Norwich, but instead of the estates 
they got the revenues of some monasteries. 

St. Leonard s Benedictine Cell, founded on a hill 
near the city by Bishop Herbert; granted, 5 Elizabeth, 
to Thomas Duke of Norfolk. 



LIST OF 

Kairo, or Carow, Benedictine Nunnery, endowed 
in the year 1146, by King Stephen; yearly value 84Z. 
12s. ld., now worth 1,692Z. 2s. 6cZ.; granted, 30 
Henry VIII, to John Shelton, Knight. 

Chapel in the Fields, built in the year 1250, by Sir 
John Brown, Priest; rents 861. 16s. Q~d. t now worth 
1,736Z. Os. 10cZ.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Doctor 
Miles Spenser. 

St. Giles s Hospital, founded in the year 1249, by 
Walter Bishop of Norwich; rents 90Z. 12s. ; now worth 
1S12Z. 

Lazar s Houses, several of them founded here for 
the poor ; granted to Edmond Newport. 

An Augustine Friary, settled here in the time of 
Edward I.; granted, 2 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas 
Henneage and to William Lord Willoughby. 

The Black Friary, founded by Sir Thomas Gelham, 
in the year 1226; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to the 
Mayor and Citizens. 

The House of Grey Friars, founded in the year 1226, 
by John de JrJastingford ; granted, 30 Henry VIII,, to 
the Duke of Norfolk. 

The White, or Carmelite Friary, founded in the 
year 1256, by Philip Cougate of Norwich; granted, 
34 Henry VIII.. to Richard Andrews and Leonard 
Chamberlain. 

At PENTNEY. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
reign of William the Conqueror, by Robert de Vallileus ; 
yearly value 2151. 18s. 8a 7 ., now worth 4,318Z. 13s. 4cZ. ; 
granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Thomas Mildmay. 

At PET ERSTONE. An Augustine Priory, founded before 
the year 1200 ; granted 4 Edward VI. 

At RUSH WORTH. A College, founded in the year 1342, 
by Sir Edmond de Gonville, Priest ; yearly value 85Z. 15s. 0|c?. 
now worth 1,715Z. Os. IQd. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to 
Henry Earl of Surrey ; and after that to Sir John Cheke. 

At SHOULDIIAM. A Cistercian Priory, founded in the 
reign of Richard I., by Jeffery Fitz Piers, Earl of Essex ; 
rents 171Z. 6s. 8cZ, now worth 3,426Z. 13s. 4cZ. ; granted, 
7 Edward VI., to Thomas Mildmay. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At SLEVESHOLM. A Cluniac Cell, in the parish of 
Methwold, by William Earl Warren, in the year 1222; 
granted, 23 Elizabeth, to Osbert Mundeford. 

At SPORLE. An Alien Priory, granted, 1 Elizabeth, to 
Eaton College. 

At THETFORD. A Cluniac Priory, founded in the year 
1 104, by Roger Bigod, Nobleman ; yearly value 41 SI. 6s. 3d. 
now worth 8,369J. 5s. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Thomas 
Duke of Norfolk. 

A Benedictine Nunnery, founded about the year 
1160, by Hugh de Norwold, Abbot; rents 50J. 9s. 8d. 
now worth 1,009J. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., 
to Richard Fulmerston, Esq. 

A College, or Guild, founded in the reign of Ed 
ward I., by Gilbert de Pykenham; rents 51. 9s. 7d., 
now worth 109^. lls. Sd. ; granted, 7 James I., to 
Francis Morice and Francis Philips, Esqs. 

St. John s Hospital, founded for lepers ; granted, 32 
Henry VIII., to Richard Fulmerstone, Esq. 

St. Mary Magdalen s Hospital, founded by John de 
Warren, Earl of Surrey, and he endowed it with 864 
acres of land; yearly value II. 13s. 6d. only, now worth 
33/. 10s. ; granted to Sir Richard Fulmerstone. 

An Augustine Friary, granted 32 Henry VIII., to 
Sir Richard Fulmerstone. 

At TIIOMESTO^T. A College, founded, 23 Edward III., 
by Sir Thomas de Shardelau and his brother ; yearly value 
52/. 15s. 7 id., now worth 1,0551. 12s. 6cZ.; granted, 32 
Henry VIII., to Sir Edmond Knyvet. 

At WABURN. An Augustine Priory, founded in the reign 
of Henry II., by Sir Ralph Meyngaryn; yearly value 28/. 
7s. 2d., now worth 567/. 3s. 4d.; granted to Richard Hey- 
don, 37 Henry VIII. 

At WALSINGHAM. An Augustine Priory, built in the 
year 1061, by the widow of Richoldis de Favarches ; yearly 
value 4461. 14s. 4d , now worth 8,934Z. 7s. 6d.; granted, 
31 Henry VIII., to Thomas Sidney. 

A Franciscan Friary,* founded about the year 1346, 
by Elizabeth de Burgo, Countess of Clare ; value 
yearly 3 /., now worth 60/. ; granted, 36 Henry VIIL, 
to John Eyer. 



LIST OF 

At WELLES. An Alien Priory, founded in the time of 
William the Conqueror, by William de Streis ; granted, 
2 Edward VI., to the Bishops of Ely. 

At WENDLING. A Premonstratensian Monastery, found 
ed, 50 Henry III., by the Rev. William de Wendling; va 
luation, 551. 18s. 4Jc/., now worth 1,1 18Z. Is. 6d.; granted, 
16 Elizabeth, to Edward Dyer and H. Cressener. 

AtW r ESTACRE. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
time of William Rufus, by Oliver the parish priest ; 
value 308Z. 19s. \\d. yearly, now worth 6,179J. 19s. 2d; 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to Thomas Gresham. 

At WE Y BRIDGE. An Augustine Priory, founded early, 
by the Bigod family; value 11. 13s. 4c?, yearly, now worth 
153Z. 6s. Sd.; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Richard Ful- 
merstone. 

At WIRHAM. An Alien Priory, founded by the Earls of 
Clare, in the time of Richard I. ; value 11. 1 6s. yearly, now 
worth 1561; granted to Thomas Guibon and William .Mynn. 

At WORMGAY. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
time of Rchard I., by William de Warren; granted,- 4 Ed 
ward VI., to the Bishop of Norwich. 

At WYMONDHAM. A Benedictine Monastery, founded 
in the year 1107, by William de Albini; yearly value 
72J. 5s. 4d, now worth 1,445/. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 37 
Henry VIII., to Sir Walter Hadden. 

An Hospital, founded by William de Albini, in the 
year 1146 ; granted to the Corporation of Norwich. 

At YARMOUTH. A Benedictine Cell, built in the year 
1101, by Herbert Bishop of Norwich; now belongs to the 
Cathedral of Norwich. 

St. Mary s Hospital, built in the time of Edward I., 
by Thomas Falstoff; the chapel and rooms are now a 
grammar school, and workhouse for the poor. 

A Dominican Friary, built, 55 Henry III., by Sir 
William Garbridge; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Richard Andrews and Leonard Chamberlain. 

A Grey Friary, founded in the time of Henry III., 
by Sir William Garbridge; granted, 33 Henry VIII., 
to Sir Richard W r illiams, alias Cromwell. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

A Carmelite Friary founded, in the year 1278, by 
King Edward I. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Thomas 
Denton and Richard Nottington. 



NORTHAMPTON (COUNTY). 

At CANON S ASHBY. An Augustine Priory, founded in 
the time of John; valuation 127/. 19s. yearly, now worth 
2,559/.; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to Sir Francis Bryan. 

At BARNACKE. A College, granted, 6 Edward VI., to 
David Vincent. 

At CHACOMB. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
time of Henry II., by Hugh de Chacomb; value 931. 6s. 3Jc?. 
yearly, now worth 1,8667. 5s. lOd; granted, 35 Henry VIII., 
to Michael Fox. 

At COTHERSTOKE. A College, founded in the year 1336, 
by the Rev. John Gifford ; granted, 1 Edward VI. to Sir 
Robert Kirkham. 

At DAVENTRE. A Cluniac Priory, built in the time of 
William the Conqueror, by Hugh de Leicester; value 
236/. 7s. tid. yearly, now worth 4,7277. 10s.; granted, by 
Henry VIII., to Christ-Church, in Oxford. 

At ST. DEWES, or St. DAVID S, near Northampton. An 
Hospital, founded in the year 1200, by Walter the Prior 
of St. Andrew s; value 247. 6s. Id. yearly, now worth 
4867. Is. Sd. 

At DINGLEY. A House of Hospitalers, built in the time 
of Stephen ; rents 108/. 13s. 5Je?., now worth 2,173/. 9s. 2c7.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Edward Griffith. 

At FODRINGHEY. A College, founded, in the year 1411, 
by King Henry IV.; value 4197. 11s. lOfd. yearly, now 
worth 8,3917. 17s. 6d. ; granted to James Crew. 

At HIGHAM FERRERS. A College, founded in the time 
of Henry V., by the most Reverend and munificent Henry 
Chichele, Archbishop of Canterbury; value 1567. 2s. 7%d. 
yearly, now worth 3,1247. 12s. 6rf. ; granted, 6 Elizabeth, 
to John Smith and Richard Duffield. 



LIST OF 

At CASTLE HYMEL. An Augustine Priory, founded in 
the reign of John, by Richard Engain Lord of Blatherwike; 
value 6*21. 16s. yearly, now worth 1,256/. ; granted, 33 
Henry VIII., to John Lord Russel. 

At IRTELINGBURGH. A College, founded in the time 
of Edward III., by the Executrix of John Pyel; value 
64Z. 12s. 10|rf. yearly, now wortn 1,292Z. 17s. 6c?.; granted, 
23 Elizabeth, to Edward Downing and P. Ashton. 

At KATEBI, or KATES.BEY. A Benedictine Nunnery, 
built in the time of Richard I., by Robert de Esseby ; value 
145Z. Os. 6d. yearly, now worth 2,900J. 10s.; granted, 28 
Henry VIII. , to John Onley. 

At LUFFIELD. A Benedictine Priory, founded, 24 
Henry I., by Robert Bossu Earl of Leicester; yearly value 
19/. 19s. 2eJ., now worth 399Z. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 5 Ed 
ward VI., to Sir Nicholas Throgmorton. 

At NORTHAMPTON. A Cluniac Priory, founded in the 
year 1076, by Simon Seinliz, Earl of Huntingdon; value 
344J. 13s. 7rf. yearly, now worth 6,893J. lls. 80?.; granted, 
4 Edward VI., to Sir Thomas Smith. 

An Augustine Priory, founded, in the year 1112, by 
William Peverell, natural son of William the Con 
queror; value 213/. 17s. 2d. yearly, now worth 
4,377*. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Nicholas 
Giffard. 

A Cluniac Nunnery de Pratis, founded in the time 
of Stephen, by Simon Seinliz Earl of Northampton ; 
value 1 191. 9s. l\d. yearly, now worth 2,389/, 12s. 6d.; 
granted, 34 Henry VIII. , to John Mershe. 

A College, founded, 38 Henry VI.; value II. 19s. 4d. 
yearly; now worth 39Z. 6s. 8d.; granted, 2 Edward. VI., 
to William Ward and Richard Venebles. 

St. John s Hospital, for the sick, founded in the 
year 1137, by Walter Archdeacon of Northampton ; 
value 251. 6s. 2d. yearly, now worth 516/. 4s. 2d.; 
granted 26 Henry VIII. 

St. Leonard s Hospital, in East Cotton, founded out 
side the town, by William the Conqueror; value 
III. 6s. Sd. yearly, now worth 226/. 13s. 4rf. 

An Augustine Friary, founded in the year 1322, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

by John Longvile; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Robert 
Dighton. 

A Black Friary, founded in the year 1240, by John 
Dabington ; value 51. Is. IQd. yearly, now worth 
107/. 185. 4d. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to William 
Ramesden. 

A Grey Friary, founded about the year 1224 ; reve 
nues 61. 13s. 4cZ., now worth 133/. 6s. 8d.; granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to Richard TaVerner. 

A Carmelite Friary, builjt in the year 1271, by 
Thomas Chetwood and Simon Montford ; value 101. 10s. 
yearly, now worth 230/. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
. "William Ramesden. 

At OXNEY. A Benedictine Cell, founded before the 
time of Richard I. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Roger 
Horton. 

At PETERBURGII. A Benedictine Abbey, begun in the 
year 655, by Peada, King of Mercia; but afterwards it 
underwent many changes during the wars ; Ethelwold 
Bishop of Winchester, assisted by King Edgar, rebuilt it 
magnificently, in the year 970; income 1,972/. 7s. Q^d; 
yearly, now worth 39,447/. Os. 10c?. 

At PIKEWELL. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1143, by William de Boutwylein ; value 347 J. 8s. OJd. 
yearly, now worth 6,948Z. Os. \Qd. ; granted, 1 Edward VI., 
to William Marquis of Northampton. 

At ROTIIWELL. An Augustine Nunnery, supposed to 
have been founded by the Clare family; value 10/. 10s. 4d. 
yearly, now worth 210/. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., 
to Henry Lee. 

AtSEWARDESLEY. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded, in 
the time of Henry II., by Richard de Lestre ; yearly value 
18Z. 11s. 2d., now worth 371 /. 3s. 4d.; granted, 4 Edward 
VI., to Richard Fermer. 

At SULBEY. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded 
about the year 1155, by William de Wideville ; rents 
305/. 8s. 5|c?., now worth 6,108/. 9s. 2d.; granted, 10 
Elizabeth, to Sir Christopher Hatton. 

At TOWCESTER. A College, founded, in the time of 
Henry VI., by William Sponue, D.D., pastor of the town; 



LIST OF 

rents 19/. 65. 8c?., now worth 3S6L 13s. 4d. ; granted, 
4 Edward VI., to Richard Heybourn and William I)alby. 

At WYRTIIORP. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the time of Henry I.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Richard 
Cecil. 



NORTHUMBERLAND (COUNTY). 

At ALNWICK. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in 
the year 1147, by Eustace Fitz John ; value 194. 7s. yearly, 
now worth 388J. 7s.; granted, 4 Edward VI., to Ralph 
Sadler and Laurence Winnington. 

At BLANCA LANDA. A Premonstratensian Abbey, 
founded in the year 1165, by Walter de Bolebec ; yearly 
value 44/. 9s. \\d., now worth 889Z. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 
37 Henry VTIL, to John Bellow and John Broxholm. 

At BREKHNBURXE. An Augustine Priory, founded in 
the reign of Henry I., by Osbertus Colutarius; yearly value 
77, now worth 1,540. ; granted, 4 Edward VI., to John 
Earl of Warwick. 

At HAMBURGH. An Augustine Cell, founded by 
Henry I.; yearly value 124/. 15s. 7c?., now worth 2,495?. 
lls. Sd.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to John Foster. 

At HEX IT AM. A Cathedral Church, Abbey, and Augus 
tine Priory. St. Wilfrid and St. Etheldreda the Queen of 
Egfrid, King of Northumberland, founded, in the year 
674, a Church ( and Monastery of the finest architecture 
ever seen in these parts of Europe. The Priory was 
founded in the reign of William the Conqueror, by Arch 
bishop Thomas ; revenues at the dissolution, 138/. Is. 9d., 
now worth 2,76U. 1 5s. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Sir 
Reginald Carnaby. 

An Hospital, founded, in the time of John, it is 
thought, by the Archbishop of York ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Reginald Carnaby. 

At HOLM. A Carmelite Friary, founded in the year 
1240, by John Lord Vesci; granted, 6 Elizabeth, to Thomas 
Reve, and William Ryvet. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At LINDISFARNE. A Cathedral Church and Benedic 
tine Cell. King Oswald gave this Island, in the year 635, 
to St. Aidan, who came from Scotland to plant Christianity 
in Northumbria, and there fixed his see. The Cell was 
founded in the year 1082 ; yearly value 601. 5s., now worth 
1,205/.; granted, 33 Henry VIII. , to the Dean and Chapter 
of Durham. 

At LAMBLEY UPON THE TYNE. A Benedictine Nun 
nery, founded by King John, in hondAir of St. Patrick ; 
yearly revenue 51. 15s. 8d , now worth 115/. l 3s. 4d. 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to John Duke of Northum 
berland. 

At NESSEHAM. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded, it is 
thought, by Lord Dacres ; yearly value 26/. 9s. 9d., now 
worth 529Z. 15*. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to James 
Lawson. 

At NEWCASTLE. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in the 
reign of William the Conqueror ; yearly value 371. 4s. 2d., 
now worth 744Z. 3s. 4d.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Wil 
liam Barantine and others. 

St. Catherine s Hospital, built in the reign of Henry 
IV., by Roger Thornton; yearly income 8/. Os. Id., 
now worth 160/. Is 8d. 

St. Mary the Virgin s Hospital, built in the reign of 
Henry III.; yearly value 261. 13s. 4d. } now worth 
533Z. 6s. Sd. 

St. Mary the Virgin s Hospital, the second of that 
name, founded in the reign of Henry 1. 

St. Mary Magdalen Hospital, founded by Henry I.; 
yearly value 9/. lls. 4cZ., now worth 191Z. 6s. 8d. 

An Augustine Friary, founded by Lord Ross ; granted, 
5 Edward VI., to John Duke of Northumberland. 

A Black Friary, founded in the year 1260, by Sir 
Peter and Sir Nicholas, Scot ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., 
to the Mayor and Burgesses of the town. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded by Richard I. : granted 
37 Henry VIII., to Richard Gresharn and Richard 
Billingford. 

A Trinitarian Friary for the redemption of Captives, 
founded by William . Wakefield, the master; granted, 



LIST OF 

37 Henry VIII., to Richard Gresham and Richard 
Billingford. 

At NOVUM MONASTERIUM, near MORPETH. A Cis 
tercian Abbey, founded, by Ranulph de Merlay, in the year 
1138; yearly value 140/. 10s. 4d. t now worth 2,810/. 6s. 8c?.: 
granted, 7 James I., to Robert Brandling. 

At Ov IN GUAM. An Augustine Cell, founded by Mr, 
Ufranvile; rents 131. 4s. Sd., now worth 268/. 13s. 4d. 

At TINMOUTH. A Benedictine Cell, founded by St: 
Oswald, the first Christian King of Northumberland. 
St. Herebald was Abbot here in the beginning of the eighth 
century. Yearly value 51 17. 4s. Id., now worth 10,224. 
Is. Sd.; granted, 5 Edward VI., to John Duke of Northum 
berland. 



NOTTINGHAM (COUNTY). 

At BEAU VALE. A Carthusian Priory, founded, 17 Ed 
ward III., by Nicholas de Cantilupo ; valued at 227/. 8s. 
yearly, now worth 4548/. ; granted, 4 Edward VI., to 
Richard Morisdn. 

At BLYTII. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the year 
1088, by Roger de Builly ; rents 126/. 8s. 1\d. yearly, 
now worth 2528/. 4s. 2d. ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to 
Richard Andrews and William Ramesden. 

An Hospital, founded for the sick, by William de Cressy, 
Lord of Hodesac ; yearly value 8/. 14s., now worth 1741. 

At BRODIIOLM. A Premonstratensian Nunnery, founded 
in the reign of Stephen, by Agnes de Camvile ; yearly 
revenue 16/. 5s. 2c?., now worth 325/. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 
6 Elizabeth, to John Caniers and William Haber. 

At CLIFTON. A College, founded in the year 1156, by 
Ralph Brito; rents 611. 4s. Sd., now worth 1,224/. 13s. 4d. ; 
granted to Antony Strelley. 

At FISKARTON. An Augustine Cell, founded by Ralph 
de Ayncourt ; granted to Edward Fynes, Lord Clinton, and 
Thomas Morrison. 

At LENTON. A Cluniac Priory, founded by William 
Peverell, in the reign of Henry I.; rents 417J. 19s. 3d., 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

.now worth 8,359/. 55. ; granted, 5 Elizabeth, to John 
Harrington. 

At MARSIIE. A Benedictine Cell; valued yearly at 
6U 6s. 8d., now worth 1,266J. 13s. 4d. 

At MATTERSEY A Gilhertine Priory, founded in the 
year 1192, by Robert deMaresey; granted, 31 Henry VIII., 
to Antony Neville, Esq. 

At NEWARK. An Hospital, founded by Alexander 
Bishop of Lincoln, in the reign of Henry I. ; yearly revenue 
171. Is. 9%d., now worth 34U 15s. IQd. 

An Augustine Friary ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to 
John Andrews. 

At NEWSTEAD. An Augustine Priory, built by Henry 
II. in the year 1170; yearly revenue 219/. 18s. 8%d., now 
worth 4,398^. 14s. 2d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir 
John Byron. 

At NOTTINGHAM. St. Jones Hospital, for the sick poor, 
founded before the time of John; rents 4/. 13s. 4c/., now 
worth 93/. 6s. 8d. 

Plumtree s Hospital, founded, 16 Richard II., by 
John Plumtree, for poor old widows; rents III. Is., 
now worth 22 U. 

A House of Grey Friars, founded, Henry III., in 
the year 1250 ; granted, 2 Edward VI., to Thomas 
Henneage. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded about the year 1276, 
by Lord Grey, of Wilton, and Sir John Shirley ; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII., to James Hurley. 

At RODINGTON. A College, founded by William Ba- 
bington, Esq., in the time of Henry VI.; rents 30/., now 
worth 600J. 

At RUFFORD. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1 148, by Gilbert Earl of Lincoln ; value 254/. 6s. 8d. yearly, 
now worth 5,086/. 13s. 4d.; granted to George Earl of 
Shrewsbury. 

At SHELFORD. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
time of Henry II., by Ralph Hanselyn ; rents 15 1/. 14s. If/., 
now worth 3,034/. Is. 80?.; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to 
Michael Stanhope. 

u 



LIST OF 

At SIBTHORP. A College, founded in the time of 
Edward IT., by Geffrey le Scrop; rents 25Z. 18s. Sd., now 
worth 518/. 13s. 4d.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Richard 
Whalley and Thomas Magnus. 

At SOUTHWELL. A College, founded in the year 630, 
by Paulinus Archbishop of York ; worth at the valuation of 
26 Henry VIII., 516J. Is. 6%d. 9 now worth 10,32U. 
105. lOd. 

At STOKE, by Newark. An Hospital for sick persons, 
founded very early; valued at 91. yearly, now worth ISO/.; 
granted, 18 Elizabeth, to John Mersh and Francis 
Greneham. 

At TPIURGARTO^T. An Augustine Priory, founded in 
the year 1130, by Ralph de Ayncourt; yearly value 359L 
15s. 10d., now worth 7,195J. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII., to William Cooper. 

At WALLINGWELLS. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded 
in the reign of Stephen, by Ralph de Cheurolcourt ; yearly 
income 877. Us. 6d., now worth 1,751/. 10s. ; granted, 
6 Elizabeth, to Richard Pype and Francis Boyer. 

At WELBECK. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in 
the year 1153, by Thomas Jocei; yearly income 298. 
4s. 8rf., now worth 5,964. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII., to Richard Whalley. 

AtWiRKEsop, or RADFORD. An Augustine Priory, 
founded, 3 Henry I., by William de Luvetol; yearly value 
302Z. 6s. 10c?., now worth 6,046J. 16s. 8d. ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to Francis Earl of Shrewsbury. 



OXFORD (COUNTY). 

At BA^BURY. A College; yearly income 48 1. 6s, now 
worth 966Z. 

An Hospital for several sick persons, founded in the 
reign of John; yearly value 15J. Is. 10c?., now worth 
SOU. 6s. 8rf. 

At BRUERIA, or BRUERNE. A Cistercian Abbey, 
founded in the year 1 147 ; by Nicholas Basset ; yearly value 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

124/, 105. lOd, now worth 2,490/. 16s. 8d. ; granted, 
8 James I., to Sir Antony Coke. 

At BURC ESTER. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
year 1182, by Gilbert Basset, Baron of Hedington; yearly 
value 167/. 2s. 10c?., now worth 3,3421. 16s. 8d. ; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At BURFORD. An Hospital ; valued at 13/. 6s. 6c?., now 
worth 266/. 10s.; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Edward 
Herman. 

At CAVERS H AM. An Augustine Cell, founded in the 
year 1162. 

At CIIARLETON. An Alien Priory, founded in the year 
1081, by Hugh Grentemoisnil ; granted to Sir Thomas 
White and others. 

At CLATTERCOTE. A Gilbertine Priory, founded in the 
time of King John ; yearly value 34/. 19s. lie?., now worth 
699 J. 18s. 4rf.; granted, 2 Elizabeth, to Thomas Lee. 

At CROWMERSH. An Hospital, built before the year 
1248 ; granted to Thomas Grate wick and Anselm Lamb. 

At DORCHESTER. An Augustine Prior} 7 , founded in the 
year 1140, by Alexander Bishop of Lincoln; yearly value 
219J. 12s. 0|d., now worth 592Z. Os. 10d.; granted, 36 Henry 
VIII., to Edmond Ashfield. 

At EGNESHAM. A Benedictine Abbey, founded in the 
year 1005, by Ailmer Earl of Cornwall; yearly value 44 H. 
16s. Id., now worth 8,836J. Is. 8d; granted, 35 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Edward North and William Darcey. 

At EWELME. An Hospital for the Poor, founded in the 
year 1437, by William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk ; yearly 
value 20/., now worth 400/. 

At GODESTON. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded by 
Editha, a religious woman, in the reign of Henry I. ; yearly 
value 319Z. 18s. 8rf., now worth 6,398J. 13s. 4d. ; granted 
by Henry VIII., to his Physician, Doctor George Owen. 

At GORIXG. An Augustine Nunnery, founded in the 
time of Henry II. ; yearly value 60/. 5s. 6d., now worth 
1,205J. 10s.; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of 
Suffolk, and afterwards to Sir Thomas Pope. 

At GOSFORD. A House of Hospitalers, founded in the 
u 2 



LIST OF 

rear 1180, by Robert D Oily; granted, 34 Henry VIIL, to 

"Antony Stringer and John Williams. 

At LITTLEMORE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of Henry II. ; yearly value 33Z. 65. 80?., now worth 
(jofi/. 13s. 4t/. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to William Owen 
and John Bridges. 

At NORTON. An Augustine Priory, founded in the reign 
of Henry II , by W T illiam Fitz Alan ; yearly value 50/., now 
worth 1000/. ; granted to the Brazen Nose College, Oxford. 

At ASENEY. An Augustine Priory, built in the year 
1129, by Robert D Oily, on an island in the river, near the 
Castle of Oxford ; yearly value 7551. 18s. 6|^., now worth 
15,118*. 10s. lOd. 

At OXFORD. St. Frideswide s, now Christ Church. 
King Didanus built this as a Nunnery, in the year 730 ; his 
own daughter Frideswide, who was afterwards canonized, 
had presided there. It became, in the course of time, a 
Priory, which was suppressed by virtue of a Bull from Pope 
Clement VIF. dated April 3, 1525; and the site and lands 
granted to Cardinal Wolsey, who founded there a noble 
College for a Dean, Sub-dean, one hundred Canons, thir 
teen Chaplains, professors of the Canon and Civil Law, 
Physic, and of all the Arts and Sciences, and other persons, 
to the number of 186 in the whole. The revenues were 
valued at 224J. 4s. 8rf., now worth 4,484/. 13s. 4d. It sup 
ports now a Dean, eight Canons, one hundred and one 
Students, eight Chaplains, eight Clerks, eight Choristers, 
twenty-four Almsmen, &c. 

St. George s College, founded in the year 1149, on 
the ruins of an ancient Monastery, which was built 
by Robert D Oily and Roger Tueri. 

All Soul s College, founded in the year 1438, by 
Henry Chichley, Archbishop of Canterbury, for a War 
den and forty Fellows, with Chaplains, Clerks, and 
Choristers; yearly value 392/. 2s. 3d., now worth 
7,842Z. 5s. 

Baliol College, built by the Widow of Sir John 
Baliol, in the year 1284, for poor Scholars; yearly 
value 74/. 3s. 4c?., now worth 1,483J. 6s. 8rf. ; it now 
consists of a Master, 12 Fellows, and 14 Scholars. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

St. Bernard s College, founded in the year 1436, by 
Henry Chichley, Archbishop of Canterbury, for monas 
tic Students ; the revenues and buildings were con 
verted, in the year 1555, to support what is called 
St. John the Baptist. 

Brasen Nose College, built by William Smith, 
Bishop of Lincoln, and Sir Richard Sutton, in the 
year 1511, for a Master and several Students, 

Canterbury College, founded in the year 1349, by 
the Most Reverend Simon de Islip, Archbishop of Can 
terbury, to repair the chasm which was made in the 
Clergy by the pestilence ; he purchased some lands and 
built on it this, under the name of Canterbury Hall, 
for Students in the Canon and Civil Laws. It was 
made, 38 Henry VIII. , a part of Christ Church 
College. 

Corpus Christ! College, built in the year 1513, by 
Richard Fox, Bishop of Winchester, and Hugh Old- 
ham, Bishop of Exeter, for Augustine Students ; yearly 
value 3827. 8s. 9d., now worth 7,6487. 15s. ; supports 
at present a Superior, twenty Fellows, twenty Scholars, 
two Chaplains, and two Clerks, &c. 

Durham College, founded in the year 1290, by the 
Convent of Durham, for their Students ; increased 
afterward in buildings, revenues and books, by Hugh 
de Bury, the learned Bishop of that see ; yearly value 
115Z. 4s. 4d., now worth 2,304/. 6s. Sd. ;"iiovv called 
Trinity College. 

Exeter College, or Stapleton Hall, founded in the 
year 1314, by Walter Stapleton, Bishop of Exeter, for 
his Students, where Hart Hall now stands ; revenues 
8 II. 9s. yearly, now worth 1,629/. Supports now a 
Rector, twenty-two Fellows, and some Scholars. 

Glocester Hall, or College ; the site was given, in the 
year 1283, by Sir John Giffard, to the Benedictine 
Friars, to build a habitation in the University ; called 
now Worcester College. 

Lincoln College, founded in the year 1427, by 
Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln, and the Arch 
bishop of York and others; yearly value 10H. 8s. Wd. t 



LIST OF 

now worth 2,028?. 16s. Sd. Supports a Rector, twelve 
Fellows, and some Scholars. 

London College, founded in the year 1421, by 
Richard Clifford, Bishop of London, for secular and 
regular Students of Civil Law ; suppressed in the reign 
of Henry VIII. 

Magdalen College. William Patten, Bishop of 
Winchester, founded in the year 1448, a Hall for 
Students; and in the year 1458 a fine College, for a 
President, forty Fellows, thirty Scholars, four Chap 
lains, eight Clerks, sixteen Choristers, &c.; yearly 
value 1,076/. 5s. 2c?., now worth 21,525?. 3s. 4d. 

St. Mary College, founded by Thomas Holden, Esq., 
in the year 1435, for the Augustine Students ; granted, 
38 Henry VIII., to William Ramesden and Richard 
Vavasor. 

Merton College, founded in the year 1267, by Walter 
de Merton, Lord Chancellor of England, and after 
wards Bishop of Rochester, for Chaplains and Stu 
dents ; yearly value 354?. 2s. 6e?., now worth 7,082?. 10s. 
Supports a Warden, twenty-four Fellows, fourteen 
Post Masters, &c. 

New College, or Winchester College, founded and 
amply endowed by William of Wykeham, Bishop of 
Winchester, in the year 1386, for a Warden, seventy 
Scholars, ten Chaplains, three Clerks, and sixteen 
Choristers; yearly value 487?. 7s. 8c?., now worth 
9,747?. 13s. 4c?. 

Oriel, or St. Mary College, built, in the year 1324, 
by King Edward III., and Adam de Brom, Almoner to 
King Edward II., for students ; valued at 182?. 8s. 6d. 
yearly, now worth 3,648?. 10s. This supports now a 
Provost, 18 Fellows, &c. 

Queen s College, founded in the year 1340, by Ro 
bert de Eglesfield, Chaplain to Queen Philippa ; yearly 
value 302Z. 2s. 10d, now worth 6,042?. 16s. Sd. It 
supports now a Provost, 16 Fellows, two Chaplains, 
some Bachelors, two Clerks, and 19 under-graduate 
Scholars. 

University College. King Alfred founded in this 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

city three Societies or Halls ; one for students in gram 
mar ; the second for philosophy ; and the third for di 
vinity : but it is certain that this University was either 
rebuilt or enlarged by the bounty of William Archdea 
con of Durham, Walter Skirlaw, Bishop of Durham, 
and some Noblemen, in the year 1249 ; valued, 26 
Henry VIII., at78Z. 14s. 7d.,now worth 1, 51 41. Us. Bd.; 
supports now a Master, 12 Fellows, 13 Scholars, &c. 

St. Bartholomew s College, half a mile east of the 
town, supposed to have been founded by King Henry I. 

Carmelite Friary, settled in the royal palace of 
Beaumont, by King Edward II. ; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII., to Edward Powel. 

Trinity House, for the redemption of Captives, 
founded in the year 1291, by Edmund Earl of Corn 
wall. 

At RE w LEY. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1280, by the executors of Richard King of the Romans, to 
pray for his soul ; yearly value 17 41. 3s. OJc?., now worth 
3,483^. 05. Wd. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to the Dean and 
Chapter of Christ Church, Oxford. 

At SAUNFORD. A Templar s Hospital, founded by Maud, 
Queen of King Stephen; granted, 33 Henry VIII,, to Ed 
ward Powell. 

At STODELEY. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in the 
reign of Henry II., by Bernard de St. Walerico; yearly 
value 102/. 6s. 7|d, now worth 2046/. 12s. 6d. ; granted, 
31 Henry VIII., to John Croke. 

At TAME. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1137, by the bounty of Alexander Bishop of Lincoln; 
yearly value 256Z. 13s. !\d., now worth 5,133/. 12s. 6d. ; 
granted, 1 Edward VI., to Edward Duke of Somerset. 

At WROXTON. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
reign of Henry III., by Mr. Michael Belet ; yearly value 
78Z. 14s. 3d., now worth 1,574/. 5s. ; granted, 36 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Thomas Pope, who gave a part to Trinity Col 
lege, Oxford. 



LIST or 



RUTLAND (COUNTY). 

At BROOKE. An Augustine Priory, founded by Hugh 
Ferrers, in the reign of Richard I. ; yearly value 43Z. 13s.4d., 
now worth 873J. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to An 
tony Coope. 

At EDITH WESTOST. An Alien Priory, built in the 
reign of Henry I., by William de Tankerville; granted, 
4 Edward VI., to William Marquis of Northampton. 

A College, founded, 25 Edward III., by William 
Wade and John Wade, Chaplain ; yearly value 22 J, 
18. 6d., now worth 458 /. 10s. ; granted, 1 Elizabeth, 
to John Lord St. John. 

At OKEIIAM. A College for poor people, built in the 
year 1398, by William Dalby of Exton ; yearly value 26 J. 
13s. 4d., now worth 533Z. 6s. Bd. ; granted, 26 Henry VIII.., 
to, Richard Flower, 



SALOP (COUNTY). 

At BATTLEFIELD. A College, a mile north of Shrews 
bury, founded in the year 1403, by Henry 1^. ; yearly 
value 541. Is. lOd, now worth 1,081 J. 16s. Bd. 

At BILDEWAS. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1135, by Roger Bishop of Chester; yearly value 129^. 
6s. lOrf., now worth 2,586J. 16s. 8 d. ; granted, 29 Henry 
VIII., to Edward Lord Powis. 

AtBREWGOD. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded prior to 
the reign of King John; yearly value 31 /. 14s., now worth 
62 R 6s. Bd.; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to William Whor- 
wood. 

At BRIDGENORTII. A College, founded in the reign of 
William Rufus, by Robert Earl of Shrewsbury ; granted, 
21 Elizabeth, to Sir Christopher Hatton. 

Hospital, founded in the reign of Richard I., by 
Ralph le Strange ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Leonard 
Edwards. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

AtBROMFiELD. A Benedictine Cell, built about the 
time of Henry I,, ; yearly value 111. 18s. 3d., now worth 
1,558. 5s. ; granted to Charles Fox. 

At BURFORD. A Collegiate Church, founded in the 
reign of Edward I.; granted, 13 Elizabeth, to William 
James and John Grey. 

AtCniRBURY. An Augustine Priory, founded 11 Henry 
III. ; yearly value 871. Is. 4d., now worth 1,747/. 6s. 8d. ; 
granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Edward Hampton. 

At HAGHMON. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
year 1110, by William Fitz Alan, of Clun ; yearly value 
294J. 12s. 9d., now worth 5,8921. 15s. ; granted, 32 Henry 
VIII., to Edmund Littleton. 

At HALES. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded, 16 
John, by Peter de Rupibus, Bishop of Winchester ; yearly 
value 3371. 15s. 6Jd., now worth 6,1551. 10s. 10d.; grant 
ed 30 Henry VIII., to Sir John Dudley. 

At HALSTON. A Templars Hospital ; yearly value 
160/. 14s. 10d., now worth 3,214/. 16s. 8d.; granted, 5 
Elizabeth, to William Home. 

At LILLESHULL. An Augustine Priory, built in the 
year 1145; yearly value 3211. 10s., now worth 6,550/. ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to James Leveson. 

At LUDLOW. An Hospital, built in the reign of John ; 
yearly value 27/. 16s. 10c?., now worth 5561. 16s. 8rf. ; 
granted, 1 Edward VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

Augustine Priory, built about the year 1282 ; grant 
ed to George Cotton and William Man. 

Carmelite Friary, founded in the year 1349, by 
Lawrence of Ludlow ; granted, 2 Elizabeth, to Richard 
Hacket and Thomas Trentharn. 

At MORFIELD. A Benedictine Cell, founded and en 
dowed by the Earl of Shrewsbury ; yearly value 15/., now 
worth 300/.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Henry Lord 
Lisle. 

At NEWPORT. A College, founded, 20 Henry VI., by 
Thomas Draper; granted, 13 Elizabeth, to Edmond Dow- 
ing and Peter Ashton. 

At PONS BURY. A College built before the reign of* 
Edward I. ; yearly value 40t 17s. 3d, now worth 817/. 5s. 



LIST OF 

At RATLINGCOPE. An Augustine Cell, built in the 
reign of John ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Robert Long. 

At SHREWSBURY. A Benedictine Monastery, founded 
in the year 1083, by Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Arun- 
del; yearly value 615/. 4s. 3d., now worth 12,304Z. 5s. ; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Edward Watson and Henry 
Herd son. 

St. Chadd s College, founded before the time of 
William the Conqueror ; yearly value 14Z. 14s. 4e/., 
now worth 294/. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 3 Edward VI., to 
John Southcott and John Chadderton. 

St. Michael s College, founded prior to the time of 
Edward the Confessor; rents and tythes made 131. 
Is. 8d., now worth 26 II. 13s. 4d. ; granted to Thomas 
Reeve and George Cotton. 

St. Chadd s Hospital for poor persons, founded by 
the Society of Mercers in the town. 

St. John s Hospital, built prior to the time of Ed 
ward II. ; rents 41. 10s. 4cf., now worth 90J. 6s. Sd. 

An Augustine Friary, founded by the Staffords 
granted, 53 Henry VIII., to Richard Andrews and 
Nicholas Temple. 

A House of Black Friars, founded by Lady Gene- 
vile; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Richard Andrews 
and Nicholas Temple. 

A House of Grey Friars, founded in the reign of 
Henry III., by Hawise Countess of Powis; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Richard Andrews and Nicholas 
Temple. 

AtToNGE. A College, founded in the year 1410, by 
Isabel, Widow of Sir Fulk Pembroke, and the Reverend 
William Swan, and Rev. William Mosse; valued yearly 
at22/. 8s. Id., now worth 448 /. Is. Sd. ; granted, 1 Ed 
ward VI., to Sir Richard Manners. 

At WENLOCK. A Cluniac Priory, founded, 14 William 
the Conqueror, by Roger of Montgomery, Earl of Arundel and 
Chichester, on the ruins of a Nunnery, founded in the year 
680, by St. Milburga, daughter of King Merwald; yearly 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

value 434/. Is. 2|d., now worth 8,68 H. 4s. 2d. ; granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to Augustino de Augustinis. 

At WOMBRIDE. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
reign of Henry I., by William Fitz Alan ; revenues at the 
dissolution, 72/. 15s. 8d., now worth \ ,4551. 13s. 4.d. ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to James Leveson. 

At WOODHOUSE. An Augustine Monastery, given to 
that Order by the Tuberville family, in the year 1250; 
granted to Thomas Reeves and George Cotton. 



SOMERSET (COUNTY). 

At ATHELNEY. A Benedictine Abbey, founded in the 
year 888, by King Alfred ; yearly value 209/. Os. 3d., now 
worth 4,180. 5s.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John 
Clayton. 

At BARLINCH. An Augustine Priory, built in the reign 
of Henry II., by William Say ; yearly value 98/. 14s. Sd., 
now worth 1,974/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to 
Sir John Wallop. 

At BATH. A Cathedral, founded in the reign of Henry I., 
by John Bishop of Wells, on the ruins of a Benedictine 
Abbey, which was originally built, 676, by King Osric, but 
destroyed and rebuilt several times afterwards ; yearly 
value 695/. 6s. \\d., now worth 13,806^. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 
34 Henry VIII., to Humphry Collins. 

St. John s Hospital, near the Cross and Hot Baths, 
founded in the year 1180, by Reginald Bishop of 
Bath, for the poor strangers ; yearly value 22/. 16s. 9d. t 
now worth 456/. 15s. ; granted, by Elizabeth, to the 
Mayor and Corporation. 
At BEARWE, or BORROW GURNEY. A Benedictine 

Nunnery, founded in the year 1200, by Gurney, Lord 

of Stoke Hamden ; yearly value 29Z. 6s. Sd. 9 now worth 5S6/. 
13s. 4d. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to William Clerke. 

At BRIDGE WATER. St. John s Hospital, founded 
before 15 John, by William Bruer, for Secular Clergy, 
under condition of keeping hospitality for the poor Natives, 



LIST OF 

and for strange Pilgrims; yearly value 120/. 19s. l|cf., 
now worth 2,419J. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Humphry Colles. 

At BRUTON. An Augustine Priory, founded in the year 
1005, by Algar Earl of Cornwall ; yearly value 480/. 17s. 2c?., 
now worth 9,617/. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to 
Maurice Berkely. 

At MINCIIIN BUCKLAND. A Nunnery and Hospital 
of Hospitalers, founded about the year 1 180, by Henry II. ; 
yearly value 223J. 7s. 4d., now worth 4,467/. 6s. Sd. ; 
granted, 36 Henry VIII,, to Alexander Popham and 
William Halley. 

At BERKELY. An Augustine Priory, built in the year 
1199, by William of Edingdon ; yearly value 6/. 5s. 2Jc?., 
now worth 125Z. 4s. 2c?. ; granted, 7 Edward VI., to John 
and James Bisse. 

At CANT KG TON. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of King Stephen, by Robert de Courcey ; yearly 
value 391. 15s. Sd., now worth 795/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to Edward Rogers. 

At CLYVE, or CLIFF. A Cistercian Abbey, founded 
in the year 1188, by William de Romare, Earl of Lincoln ; 
yearly value 155/. 9s. 5d., now worth 3,109/. 8s. 4d. ; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Thomas Earl of Sussex. 

At TEMPLE COMB. A House of Hospitalers, founded 
in the year 1185, by Serlo Odo ; yearly value 128/. 7s. 6d., 
now worth 2,56 7 /. 10s.; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Richard Andrews and Leonard Chamberlain. 

At DUNSTER. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the time 
of William the Conqueror, by Sir William de Mahun ; 
\earlyvalue 37/. 4s. Sd., now worth 744/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 
34 Henry VIII., to Humphrey Colles. 

At GL ASTON BURY. A Benedictine Monastery, founded,, 
as historians say, by Joseph of Aiimathea, The first con 
gregation of Monks, they say, were brought together by a 
disciple of St. Patrick, in the year 435. Yearly value 
3,508J. 13s. 4-|d., now worth 70,173J. 7s. 6d. ; granted, 
1 Edward VI., to Edward Duke of Somerset, and, 1 Eliza 
beth, to Sir Peter Carew. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At KEYNSHAM. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
year 1170, by William Earl of Gloucester; yearly value 
4501. 3s. 6d., now worth 9,003J. 10s.; granted, 6 Edward 
VI,, to Thomas Bridges, Esq. 

At MICHELNEY. A Benedictine Monastery, founded 
in the year 939, by King Athelstan ; yearly value 498^. 
165. 3e?., now worth 9,976J. 5s. 10c7. ; granted^ 29 Henry 
VIII., to Edward Earl of Hertford. 

AtMARTOCK. A Priory, granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Humfry Colles. 

At CHARTERHOUSE ON MENDIP. A Cell, granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to Robert May, 

AtMoNTECUTE, OLIM MONS ACUTUS. A Cluuiac Priory, 
founded by William the Conqueror; yearly value 524^. 
11s. 8d., now worth 10,49 II. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 16 Eliza 
beth, to Robert Earl of Leicester. 

At SLAVERDALE. An Augustine Priory, built by Sir 
William Zouch ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John Earl 
of Oxford. 

At STOKE CURCY. An Alien Priory, founded in the 
reign of Henry II. ; valued at the dissolution at 58Z., now 
worth 1,1 60J. 

At STOKE. A College, founded in the year 1304, by 
Sir John de Bello Campo; granted, 2 Elizabeth, to Curthbert 
Vaughan. 

AtTAUNTON. An Augustine Priory, built in the reign 
of Henry I., by William Giffard, Bishop of Winchester; 
yearly value 438/. 9s. Wd., now worth 8,769f. 16s. 8d.- } 
granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Mathew Colehurst. 

At WELLS. A Cathedral Church, built in the year 
704, by King Ina ; enlarged afterwards by different Bishops ; 
revenues of the Bishop were valued at 1,843/. 19s. 4d, and of 
the Canons 8971. 5s. lid., both sums now worth 54,825/. 5s. 

Mauntery College, built in the year 1401, by Ralph 
Erghum, Bishop of Bath and Wells, for the Clergy of 
the Cathedral ; yearly value III. 18s. 8d., now worth 
238^. 13s. 4d.; granted, 2 Edward VI., to John Ayl- 
worth and John Lacy. 

Vicar s College, began by Walter de Hull, Canon ; 



LIST OF 

enlarged, in the year 1347, by Rad. de Salopia, 
Bishop of Wells; yearly value 72J. 10s. 9^., now 
worth 1,450J. 15s. lOd. 

Brigstreet Hospital, founded for twenty- four poor 
persons, by Nicholas Buthwith, Bishop of Bath, about 
the year 1424, but maintains now, they say, only 
twenty. 

St. John s Hospital, founded in the reign of King 
John, by Hugh of Wells, afterwards Bishop of Lincoln; 
yearly value 411. 3s. 6d., now worth 823J. 10s. lOd. ; 
granted, 13 Elizabeth, to Christopher Hatton. 

At WITH AM. A Carthusian Priory, built and endowed 
by King Henry II.; yearly value 227Z. Is. 8c?., now worth 
4,54U 13s. 4d.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Ralph 
Hopton. 

At Won SPRING. A Regular Priory, founded in the 
year 1210, by William de Courtney; yearly value 110 
18s. 4I<1, now worth 2,218/. 7s. Qd.- granted, 2 Elizabeth, 
to William and John Lacy. 

At BRISTOL. A Benedictine Priory, built by Robert 
son of Henry I., in the north east of the city ; granted, 35 
Henry VIII., to Henry Brayne. 

Great St. Augustine s, now Holy Trinity and Cathe 
dral, founded in the year 1 148, by Robert Fitz Harding ; 
yearly value 767Z. 15s. 3d., now worth 15,355/. 5s. 

St. Mary Magdalen Nunnery, founded by Eva, wife 
to Robert Fitzharding, in the reign of Henry II., yearly 
value 2R 11s. 3d., now worth 431/. 5s.; granted, 31 
Henry VIII., to Henry Brayn and John Marsh. 

St. Bartholomew s Hospital, granted by Henry VIII. 
to the executors of Robert Thorn and Sir Thomas West ; 
is now a grammar school. 

St. Catherine s Hospital, founded 4 Henry III., by 
Robert de Berkele; yearly value 2 II. 15s. 8d., now 
worth 4351. 13s. 4d. 

Gaunts, or Billeswyke Hospital, built in the year 
1229, by Maurice de Gaunt, for one hundred poor 
people ; yearly value 140/., now worth 2,800 ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to the Mayor and Citizens ; is now an 
Orphan Hospital. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

St. John s Hospital, built by John Earl of Moreton, 
afterwards King of England, for the sick; yearly value 
511. 10s. 4d, now worth 1,030J. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 36 
Henry VIII., to G. Owen. 

St. Lawrence s Hospital, founded before 8 Henry III.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Sir Ralph Sadleyr. 

Lyons, or Lewin s Mede-street Hospital, founded in 
the year 1460, by William Spenser. 

St. Michael s-hill Almshouse, founded in the year 
1504, by John Foster, for one priest, eight poor men, 
and five poor women, is yet in being. 

Rad cliff-hill Almshouse, built in the year 1442, by 
William Cannings, is still in being, though having no 
endowment. 

Temple-street Hospitals. Under Tucker s Hall is 
one founded by the Tucker s Company ; under the 
Weaver s Hall is another founded at a very early 
period. 

Temple Gate Hospital, built by Roger Magdalen of 
Nojiney. 

Trinity Hospital, founded 4 Henry V., by John 
Barstable, merchant of the town ; granted, 20 Elizabeth,, 
to the Mayor and Corporation ; is still in being. 

An Augustine Friary, built in the reign of Edw. II., 
by Sir Simon and Sir William Montacute ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Maurice Dennis. 

The Black Friary, founded by Sir Maurice Gaunt ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to William Chester. 

The Grey Friars House, founded in the year 1234 ; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII., to the Mayor and Citizens. 



STAFFORD (COUNTY). 

At BLYTHBURY. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of Henry I., by Hugh Malveysin. 

At BRIWERNE, or, the BLACK LACIES OF BREWOOD, 
founded prior to the time of Richard I. ; yearly value III. 
Is. 6d., now worth 221/. 10s,; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to 
Thomas Gilford. 



LIST OF 

At BURTON-UPON-TRENT. A Benedictine Abbey, 
founded in the year 1004, by Walfric Spot; yearly value 
3561. 16s. 3|d., now worth 7,136J. 5s. 10c?.; granted, by 
Henry VIII., to Sir William Paget. 

At CALAVICK. A Benedictine Priory, built in the year 
1142, by Geva, daughter of Hugh Earl of Chester; yearly 
value 25/. 10s. 3d., now worth 510/. 5s. 

At CHOTES. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1176, by Bertram de Verdun; yearly value 103/. 6s. 7c?., 
now worth 2,066/. 11s. Sd,; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
Jeffry Foljamb. 

At DIEULACRES. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1214, by Randal de Blundervill, Earl of Chester; 
value 243/. 3s. 6d. yearly, now worth 4,863/. 10s. ; granted, 
6 Edward VI., to Ralph Bagnall. 

At DUDLEY. A Cluniac Cell, founded in the year 1161, 
by Ralph Painell, lord of the manor, in pursuance of his 
father s will ; value 33/. Is. 4d. yearly, now worth 661 1. 
6s. 8d. granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir John Dudley. 

At GNOUSHALL. A College, founded in the time of 
Henry I. ; rents 54, now worth 1,080. ; granted, 1 Ed 
ward VI., to the Bishop of Lichfield and his successors. 

At HULTOX. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1223, by Henry Audley ; value 76L 14s. ll|e/. yearly, now 
worth 1,534/. 19s. 2d. ; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Sir 
Edward Aston. 

At LAPPELE. An Alien Priory, founded in the time of 
Edward the Confessor, by Algar, Earl of Chester or Mercia; 
granted, 1 Edward VI. ; to Sir Richard Manners. 

At LICHFIELD. A Cathedral Church, built in the year 
656, by King Oswy ; underwent many changes and repairs 
since that time ; revenues 703/. 5s. 2c?. ; and of the Chap 
ter 275Z. 13s. 2d. : make together now 19,578Z. 6s. Sd. 

Vicar s Choral, that is, the Sub-chanter, Sachrist 
and Clerks, of this Cathedral, had a separate esta 
blishment ; value 199/. 10s. Id. yearly, now worth 
3,990/. lls. 8rf. 

St. John s Hospital ; value 46/. 18s. \d., now worth 
938J, Is, Sd. ; it continues to this day. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

A Grey Friary, founded in the year 1229, by Alex 
ander Bishop of Lichfield ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., 
to Richard Crumbil thorn. 

At PENKRIDGE. A College, or Free Chapel; granted, 
17 John, by Mr. Hugh House, to the Archbishop of Dublin 
and his successors ; value 106/. 15.9. yearly, now worth 
2,135Z. ; granted, 2 Edward VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

At ROUCESTER. An Augustine Priory, built in the year 
1146, by Richard Bacoun; rents 111/, lls. 7d., now worth 
2,23U 11s. Sd.; granted, 31 Henry VIIL, to Richard 
Trentham. 

At SANDWELL. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the 
time of Henry IT., by William Guy, of Ophani; rents 
made 261. 8s. 7d., now worth 528 J. lls. Sd. 

At DE SARTIS, or RONTON. An Augustine Priery, 
founded in the time of Henry II., by Robert Noeli ; value 
102Z. lls. Id. yearly, now worth 2,03U. Is. Sd.; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to John Wiseman. 

At STAFFORD. A College, or Free Chapel ; granted, by 
King Stephen, to the Bishop and Chapter of Lichfield; 
value 38/. yearly, now worth 760/. ; granted, 14 Elizabeth,, 
to the Burgesses of Stafford. 

An Augustine Priory, built in the year 1180, by 
Richard Peche, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield ; 
value 1U8/. Os. 9%d. yearly, now worth 3,960J. 15s. 10d.; 
granted, 31 Henry VIIL, to Doctor Rowland Lee, 
Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield. 

St. John s Hospital, for poor Brethren. 
St. Leonard s Spytell, or Free Chapel ; value 
41. 12s. 4c?. yearly, now worth 921. 6s. Sd. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded 10 Edward I. ; 
valued at 35/. 13s. 10d., now worth 713/. 16s. Sd. ; 
granted, 31 Henry VIIL, to James Leveson. 

An Augustine Monastery, founded in the year 1344, 
by Ralph Lord Stafford; granted to Thomas Neve and 
Giles Isam. 

At STONE. An Augustine Priory, built originally by 
Wolphere, King of Mercia, for the salvation of his two sons- 
Woliadus and Rufinus, whom he murdered before his con- 



LIST OF 

version to Christianity, in the year 670. Rents 1197. 145. 
Hid., now worth 2,394J. 19s. 2d. ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIIL, to George Harpur. 

At TAMWORTH. A College; St. Editha, daughter of 
King Edgar, founded here a Convent, which became a Col 
lege afterwards, and valued at 42/. 2s. 4c?., uow worth 
842/. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 23 Elizabeth, to Edward Downing 
and Peter Ash ton. 

An Hospital, founded 15 Edward I., by Philip 
Marmion, for the Premonstratensian Friars ; and he 
gave them in Ashfield pasture for four oxen and two 
horses, under condition of praying for his soul ; yearly 
value 31. 6s. Sd., now worth 66/. 13s. 4d. 
At TETENHALL. A College, founded in King Edgar s 
reign; value 21/. 6s. 8d. yearly, now worth 426J. 13s. 4c?.; 
granted, 3 Edward VI., to Walter Wrottesley. 

At TRICKINGHAM. An Augustine Priory, founded in 
the time of Henry I., on the ruins of a Convent, founded in 
the year 680, by King Ethelred, for his daughter, St. Wer- 
burgh, who died there an Abbess; value 106Z. 3s. IQd. 
yearly, now worth 2,123/. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At TUTBURY. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the 
year 1080, by Henry de Ferrers; rents 244J. 16s. 8d., now 
worth 4,896/. 13s. 4d.; granted, 6 Edward VI., to Sir 
William Cavendish. 

At WOLVERHAMPTOST. A College, or Monastery, built 
in the year 996, and amply endowed by a pious widow, 
Wulfruna ; underwent many alterations in after times, and 
finally became one of the King s Free Chapels; the 
Deanery valued, 26 Henry VIIL, at 38/. yearly ; and five 
Prebends 28/. ; both sums would make now 1,320/. ; 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to John Duke of Northumberland. 



SUFFOLK (COUNTY). 

At ALENSBORNE. An Augustine Priory, founded before 
the year 1466; granted, 33 Henry VIIL, to Sir John 
Wingfield. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

An Hospital of Templars, founded in the time of 
Henry II.; rents 531. 10s., now worth 1,070Z. ; granted, 
35 Henry VIII., to Sir Richard Gresham. 
At BLI BURGH. An Augustine Priory, settled by Henry I.; 
rents 48/. 8s. Wd., now worth 968J. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Sir Arthur Hopton. 

At BRUSYARD. A Nunnery of Minoresses, founded at 
Ash, by Maud Countess of Ulster, in the year 1354 ; yearly 
value 561. 2s. Id., now worth 1,122J. Is. 8d.; granted, 30 
Henry VIII., to Nicholas Hare. 

At BUNG AY. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
time of Henry II., by Roger de Glanvill ; value 62Z. 2s. \\d* 
yearly, now worth 1,242Z. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 29 Henry VIII., 
to Thomas Duke of Norfolk. 

At BURY ST. EDMOND. A Benedictine Abbey, founded 
in the year 633, by Segebert King of the East Angles, who 
quitting his crown, became religious there. The place took 
its name from the body of St. Edmond, King, that was 
translated thither, in the year 903 ; valued, at the dissolu 
tion, at 2,336/. 16s. 0d., now worth 46,736/. Os. 10d; 
granted, 2 Elizabeth, to John Eyer. 

A College, founded in the time of Edward IV.; 
granted, 2 Edward VI., to Richard Corbet. 

St. Nicholas Hospital, founded by an Abbot of the 
town ; valued at 61. 19s. 1 Id., now worth 139/. 18s. 4d. 
St. Peter s Hospital, founded in the time of Henry I., 
by Abbot Anselm, for the maintenance of aged and 
sick Priests; value 10Z. 18s. lO^rf. yearly, now worth 
218/. 17s. 6d. 

St. Saviour s Hospital, founded in the year 1184, by 
Abbot Samson and his Convent, for the support of a 
warden, twelve chaplains, six clerks, twelve poor gen 
tlemen, and twelve poor women ; granted, 34 Henry 
VIII., to Antony Stringer and John Williams. 

A Grey Friary, founded about the year 1256; 
granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Antony Harvey. 

At BUTLEY. An Augustine Priory, founded in the year 
1171, by Ranulph de Glanvil, the famous lawyer; income 
318/. 17s. 2ld, now worth 6,377J. 4s. 2<J.; granted, 36 
Henry VIII., to William Forth. 



LIST OF 

At CAMPESS. An Augustine Nunnery, founded 
6 Richard I., by Jane and Agnes, daughters of Theobald de 
Valoins, on a piece of ground which he gave them for that 
purpose; income 182. 9s. 5d., now worth 3,649Z. 8s. 4d. ; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII. , to Sir William Willoughby. 

At CLARE. An Augustine Monastery, built in the year 
1248, by Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester; granted, 
31 Henry VIII., to Richard Friend. 

At Do DN AS H. An Augustine Priory, founded in the 
time of Edward I., by the ancestors of the noble family of 
Norfolk; yearly value 42/. 18s. 8^., now worth 858/. 14s. 2d; 
granted, by Henry VIII., to Thomas Alverde. 

At DUNWICH. A House of Knights Templars ; granted, 
4 Elizabeth, to Thomas Andrews. 

St. James s Hospital ; founded in the time of Richard 
I. ; revenues 26L, now worth 520Z. 

A Black Friary; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John 
Eyre. 

A Grey Friary, founded in the time of Henry III., 
by Robert Fitz John ; granted to John Eyre. 

At EYE. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the time of 
William the Conqueror, by Robert Malet; yearly value 
184Z. 9s. l\d., now worth 3.6S9/. 12s. 6d.; granted, 
28 Henry VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At FLIXTOX. An Augustine Priory, builtin the year 1258, 
by Margery Harnes, widow of Bartholomew de Clerk ; value 
23. 4s. [d. yearly, now worth 468/. Is. 8d. ; granted, 
26 Henry VIII., to John Tasburgh. 

At GISELINGHAM. A Preceptory of Templars, founded 
before the time of Richard I., by Sir Robert de Burgate ; 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to John Grene and Robert Hall. 

At GORLESTON. An Augustine Priory, built in the time 
of Edward I., by William Woderove ; granted, 36 Henry 
VIII., to John Eyre. 

At HE RING FLEET. An Augustine Priory, founded in 
the time of Henry III., by Roger Fitz Osbert ; rents 
491. Us. Id., now worth 991Z. 11s. Sd. ; granted, 38 
Henry VIII., to Henry Jerningham. 

At HOXON. A Benedictine Cell, founded about the year 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

950, by Theodred Bishop of London ; and richly endowed 
with lands, in the year 1130, by Maurice of Winsor and 
Egidia his wife, for supporting there Monks, in order to pray 
for the soul of Ralph Dapifer ; rents 187. Is., now worth 
36H. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to Richard Gresham. 

At IPSWICH. An Augustine Priory, built before the year 
1177, by Norman Eadnothi ; rents 881. 6s. 9d., now worth 
1,7661. 15s.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Sir Thomas 
Pope. 

St. Peter and Paul, another Priory of Augustine 
Canons, founded in the time of Henry II., by Thomas 
Lacy ; granted, 9 James I., to Richard Percival and 
Edmund Duffield. 

St. Mary Magdalen and St. James Hospital, 
founded in the time of King John. 

Dandy s Almshouse, founded in the year 1515, by 

Edmund Dandy, for the poor ; granted by Edward VI. 

An Augustine Friary, founded in the time of Henry 

III., by Henry de Manesby and others ; granted, 

33 Henry VIII. , to William Sabyne. 

A Carmelite Friary, built about the year 1279, by 
Sir Thomas de Loudham; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
John Eyre. 

An Augustine Priory, built in the time of William 
the Conqueror, by Gilbert Blund ; rents 280/. 9s. 5d., 
now worth 5,609/. 8s. 4.d. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., 
to Richard Codington. 

At KERSEY. An Austin Priory, founded before 3 Henry 
III. ; granted, 25 Henry VIII., to the King s College in 
Cambridge. 

At LETHERINGTON. An Austin Cell; yearly value 26/. 
18s. 5d.j now worth 538/. 8s. 4d. , granted, 7 Edward VI., 
to Elizabeth Naunton, daughter of Sir Antony Naunton of 
Wingfield. 

At LEYESTONE. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded 
in the year 1182, by Ralph de Glanville ; yearly value 1811. 
17s. lid., now worth 3,637J. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 28 Henry 
VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At METINGHAM. A College, built 6 Richard II, ; yearly 



LIST OF 

value 202/. 7s. 5|c?. now worth 4,047J. 9s. 2cJ. ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to Thomas Denny. 

At MINDHAM. A Cluniac Priory, founded in the time 
of Stephen, on the island of Hurst, in this parish, by William 
of Huntingfield; granted to Richard Freston. 

AtREDLiNGFiELD. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded 
in the year 1 120, by Manasses Earl of Ghisnes ; yearly value 
81Z. 2s. 5|c?., now worth 1,622/. 9s. 2d. ; granted, 28 Henry 
VIII., to Edmund Bedingfield. 

At RUMBURGH. A Benedictine Cell, built about the 
time of the Conquest. 

At SIBTOIST. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1149, by William de Cheney; yearly value 250Z. 15s. 7|d., 
now worth 5,015. 12s. 6d.; granted, 1 Edward VI., to 
Sir Antony Denny. 

At SN APE. A Benedictine Priory, built in the year 1 155, 
by William Martel; yearly value 991. Is. ll^d., now worth 
1,98U 19s. 2d.; granted, 34 Henry VIIL, to Thomas 
Duke of Norfolk. 

At STOKE. A College, founded in the year 1124, by 
Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford ; yearly value 324?. 
4s. 1 JdL, now worth 6,484Z. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 2 Edward VI., 
to Sir John Cheke and Michael Mildmay. 

At SUDBURY. A College, founded in the year 1374, 
by Simon, Bishop of London, on the ruins of a very ancient 
church; yearly value 122. 18s. 3c?., now worth 4.581. 5s. ; 
granted, 36 Henry VIIL, to Sir Thomas Paston. 

A Benedictine Cell, founded in the reign of Henry 
II., by Wilfric ; granted, 34 Henry VIIL, to the Dean 
and Chapter of Westminster. 

A Hospital, founded in the time of John, by Amicia 
Countess of Clare ; granted, 5 Edward VI., to John 
Cheke, Esq. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the reign of Ed 
ward I. , by Baldwin de Shipling; granted, 31 Henry 
VIIL, to Thomas Eden, Esq. 

At WATSTGFORD. A Cluniac cell, founded before the year 
1 1 60, by Doudo Asini ; yearly value 30/. 9s. 5d., now worth 
609/. 8s. 4d.; granted, 32 Henry VIIL, to Thomas Duke 
of Norfolk. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At WILTON ST. FELIX. A Benedictine Cell, founded 
in the reign of William Rufus, by Roger Bigod ; granted, 
19 Elizabeth, to Thomas Sexford. 

At GREAT WELTHAM. A House of Crossed Friars, 
founded 2 Edward I.; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Antony 
Rouse. 

At WICK HAM. A Monastery, built in the reign of King 
Stephen, by Robert de Salco Villa, Knight. 

At WINGFIELD. A College, built in the year 1362, by 
Lady Alianor, relict of Sir John Wingfield ; yearly value 
69/. 14s. 5d. 9 now worth 1,394/. 8s. 4d. ; granted by Ed 
ward VI. to the Bishop of Norwich. 

At WOODBRIDGE. An Austin Priory, founded before 
the time of Edward II., by Ernaldus Ruffus; yearly value 
601. 3s. 5\d., now worth 1,003/. 9s. 2d.; granted, 19 Eliza 
beth, to Thomas Sexford, Master of Requests. 



SURREY (COUNTY). 

At ALDEBURY. An Austin Priory, built in the reign of 
Richard I., by Rualde Calva; yearly value 294/. 18s. 4d., 
now worth 5,898Z. 7s. 6d.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to 
Sir Antony Brown. 

AtBERMONDSEY. A Cluniac Abbey, built about the 
year 1089, by Aylwin Child, citizen of London ; yearly in 
come 548Z. 2s. 5d., now worth 10,962Z. 9s. 2d. ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to Sir Richard Southwell. 

At CHERTSEY. A Benedictine Abbey, built in the year 
666, by Erkenwald Bishop of London; destroyed, with the 
Abbot and ninety Monks killed, in the Danish wars ; rebuilt 
by King Edgar; income 744 1. 13s. Q\d. yearly, now worth 
14,893?. 10s. 10d.; granted, 7 Edward VI., to Sir William 
Fitz Williams. 

At LING FIELD. A College, built in the time of Henry VI., 
by Reginald Cobham; income 79/. 15s. lOJc?. yearly, now 
worth 1,5951. 17s. 6d. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to Thomas 
Cawarden. 

At MERTON. An Austin Priory, founded in the year 



LIST OF 

1117, by Gilbert Norman, Sheriff of Surrey; yearly value 
1,0391. 5s. 3d., now worth 20,785^. 5s. 

At NEWINGTOT?. An Hospital, continued here until the 
year 1551, when their proctor, William Cleybroke, had a 
protection or licence to beg. 

At REIGATE. An Austin Priory or Hospital, founded by 
William de Warren, Earl of Surrey; income 78/. 16s. IQd., 
now worth 1 ,5761. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to 
William Lord Howard. 

At SHENE. A Carthusian Priory, founded in the year 
1414, by Henry V. ; income 962/, 11s. 6c?., now worth 
19,251 J. 10s.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Edward Earl 
of Hertford. 

At SOUTHWARK. St. Mary Overy, Austin Priory, built 
on the ruins of an ancient Nunnery, that was founded by 
Mary, and endowed with the profits of a ferry on the 
Thames ; value 6561. 10s. Qd. yearly, now worth 13,130/. 
Os. lOd. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII. , to Sir Antony Brown. 

Overy Hospital, or St. Thomas s, founded about the 
year 1228, by the Bishop of Winchester, Peter de 
Rupibus ; value 309/. Is. lie?, yearly, now worth 
6,18U 18s. 4d.; contained, 30 Henry VIII., beds, 
food, and firing, for forty poor and sick persons, when 
it was given up. 

At TANDRIDGE, or TANKEGGE. An Austin Priory, 
founded in the time of Richard I., and much contributed to 
by Odo de Dammartin ; rents 861. 7s. 6c?., now worth 
J,727/. 10s. ; granted, 29 Henry VI1L, to John Rede. 

At WAVERLEY. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1128, by William Giffard, Bishop of Winchester; 
value 196J. 13s. lid. yearly, now worth 3,933/. 18s. 4d. ; 
granted, 28 Henry VIII., to Sir William Fitz Williams. 



SUSSEX (COUNTY). 

At ARUNDEL. An Alien Priory, founded in the time of 
William the Conqueror, by Roger of Montgomery ; became 
afterwards a College, and valued at 263J. 141. 9d. yearly, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

now worth 5,274J. 15s. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Henry 
Earl of Arundel. 

An Hospital, built 18 Edward II., by Richard Earl of 
Arundel; rents 89/. 5s. 2|d., now worth 1,7S5/. 4s. 2d.; 
granted to Sir Richard Lee. 

At BATTEL. A Benedictine Abbey, founded by Williarrr 
the Conqueror, on the spot where a decisive battle was 
fought, Oct. 14, 1066, between King Harold and William 
Duke of Normandy; value 987/. Os. I0d. yearly, now 
worth 19,7407. 17s. 6d. ; granted, 30 Henry VIIL, to Sir 
Antony Brown. 

At BEIGHAM. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in 
the year 1200, by Robert de Turreham; value 1521. 9sAd. 
yearly, now worth 3,049/. 7s. 6d. 

At BOSANHAM. A College, originally founded in the 
year 681, by St. Wilfrid ; granted, 6 Elizabeth, to the 
Dean and Chapter of Chichester. 

At BOXGRAVE. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the 
time of Henry I., by Robert de Haya; income 145/. 10s 2|</., 
now worth 2,910/. 4s. 2d. ; granted, 3 Elizabeth, to Henry 
Earl of Arundel. 

At BRAMBER. An Hospital, valued, 26 Henry VIIL, at 
20s. yearly. 

At CHICHESTER. A Cathedral, founded in the year 1075, 
by Bishop Sdgand; valued at the dissolution at 677Z. Is. 3d. 
yearly ; the Chapter s revenues made 601 /. 7s. lOrZ. : both 
together would make now 25,589/. Is. Sd. 

A College of Vicars, had revenues 3 1/. 12s. 6d.> 
now worth 632Z. 10s. 

St. James s Hospital, founded in the reign of King 
John ; rents 4/. 3s. 9d., now worth 83/. 15s. 

St. Mary s Hospital, founded for the poor; value 
III. 11s. tyd. yearly, now worth 231/. 10s. lOrf. 

An Augustine Friary, founded in the time of Ed 
ward I., by Queen Alianor ; granted, 32 Henry VIIL, 
to Edward Millet. 

A Dominican Friary, built in the reign of Henry III.; 
granted, 32 Henry VIIL, to the Mayor and Citizens. 

At DURF.FORD. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in 
x 



LIST OF 

the year 1169, by Robert Hoese ; value 108J. 13s. 9d. 
yearly, now worth 2,173/. 15s. ; granted, 29 Henry VIII. , 
to Sir William Fitz Williams. 

At EASEBORNE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in 
the time of Henry III., by Sir John Bohun ; yearly value 
47/. 3s., now worth 943/. ; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to Sir 
William Fitz Williams. 

At HASTINGS. A College, built in the time of Henry I., 
by Hugh de Augo; value 41 /. 13s. 5d. yearly, now worth 
833/. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 38 Henry VIIL, to Sir Antony 
Brown. 

An Austin Priory, founded in the time of Richard I., 
by Sir Walter Bricet; value 571. Is. 9d. yearly, now 
worth 1,159J.; granted, 29 Henry VIII., to John 
Baker. 

At LEWES. A Cluniac Priory, founded in the year 1078, 
by Earl William de Warrenna ; income 1,091/. 9s. 6|o?., 
now worth 21,829/. 10s. lOd; granted; 2 Elizabeth, to 
Richard Baker and Richard Sackville. 

At SOUTH MALLYNG. A College, founded in the year 
688, by Ceadwalla King of the West Saxons; yearly value 
45Z. 12s. 5Jd., now worth 91 2Z. 9s. 2d. 

At MICHELHAM. Austin Canons, established in the 
time of Henry III., by Gilbert de Aquila; yearly income 
19U. 19s. 3d., now worth 3,839Z. 5s.; granted, 33 Henry 
VIIL, to William Earl of Arundel. 

At PLEYDONE. An Hospital, granted, 34 Henry VIIL, 
to Andrew Lord Windsor. 

At PYNIIAM. An Austin Priory, built in the time of 
Henry L, by his Queen Adeliza; income 431. Os. IQd., now 
worth 860Z. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 5 James L, to Antony 
Lord Montage. 

At ROBERT S BRIDGE. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the 
year 1176, by Alfred de St. Martino ; yearly income 
272Z. 9s. Sd., now worth 5,449 J. 13s. 4d.; granted, 33 
Henry VIIL, to Sir William Sidney. 

At RUSPUR. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded before the 
time of Richard I. ; income 39/. 13s. 7d., now worth 
793Z. 11s. 8d.; granted. 29 Henry VIIL, to Sir Robert 
Southwell. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At SELE. An Austin Priory, built in the year 1075, by 
William de Braiosa ; valued at 267. 9s. 9d. yearly, now 
worth 5291. 15s. ; granted to the College of Oxford. 

At SHOREHAM. St. James s Hospital ; valued at 
I/. 6s. 8d., now worth 26/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 16 Elizabeth, 
to John Mersh. 

At TORTINGTON. An Austin Priory, founded in the 
time of John by Lady Hadwisa Corbet; value 10H. 4s. Id. 
yearly, now worth 2,024/. Is. Sd. ; granted, 42 Elizabeth, 
to Sir John Spencer. 

At WILMINGTON. An Alien Priory, built in the reign 
of William Rufus, by Robert Earl of Morteton ; granted, 
7 Elizabeth, to Sir Richard Sackvile. 

At WINCHELSEY. A Dominican Friary; granted, 36 
Henry VIIL, to William Clifford, and Michael Wildbore. 

At WOLINCHMERE. An Austin Priory, founded by 
Ralph de Ardern ; income 791. 15s. 6c?., now worth 1,5951. 
10s.; granted, 36 Henry VIIL, to Antony Brown. 



WARWICK (COUNTY). 

At ALEXC ESTER. A Benedictine Abbey, founded in 
the year 1140, by Ralph Pincerna ; yearly value 101/. 14s., 
now worth 2,034/. ; granted, 36 Henry VIIL, to William 
and John Sewster. 

At ASTLEY. A College, founded 17 Edward III., by 
Sir Thomas de Astley ; rents 39/. 10s. 6d., now worth 
790/. 10s.; granted, 38 Henry VIIL, to Henry Marquis 
of Dorset. 

At ATHERSTON. An Austin Friary, built 49 Edw. III., 
by Ralph Lord Basset; valued at II. 10s. 2d. yearly, now 
worth 30. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 35 Henry VIIL, to Henry 
Cartwright. 

At AVECOTE. A Benedictine Cell, built in the year 
1159, by William Burdett ; rents 28/. 6s. 2rf., now worth 
5661. 3s. 4d.; granted, 34 Henry VIIL, to Thomas Lord 
Audley, and Sir Thomas Pope. 

At BALSHALL. A House of Templars, built in the reign 



LIST OF 

of Stephen, by Roger de Moubray; granted, 8 Elizabeth, 
to Sir Robert Dudley. 

At BERMINGHAM. A Hospital, founded before the 
time of Edward I. ; yearly value 81. 5s. 3d., now worth 
J651. 5s. 

At COMBE. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 1150, 
by Richard de Camvilla ; rents 343/. Os. 5c?., now wortli 
ti,860/. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 1 Edward VI., to John Earl of 
Warwick. 

At COVENTRY. A Cathedral, created out of a Monas 
tery that was built in the year 1043, by Leofric the good 
Earl of Mercia, on the ruins of a Nunnery built by the 
Saxons, before the year 1016; rents 499/. 7s. 4c?., now 
worth 9,987/. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to John 
Combes and Richard Stansfield. 

A Chartre-House, founded in the year 1381, by 
William Lord Zouch ; rents 25K 5s. 9cL now worth 
5,0352. 15s.; granted, 34 Henry VIII. to Richard 
Andrews and Leonard Chamberlain. 

Bablake-College, founded before the year 1350, by 
the Burgesses; yearly value 111/. 13s. 8d., now worth 
2,2331. 13s. 4d. 

Bablake Hospital, founded in the year 1506, by 
Thomas Bond, draper ; rents 49/. lls. 7o?., now worth 
99 1 f. Us. Sd. 

Grey Friars Hospital, built in the year 1529, by 
William Ford, for five poor men and one poor woman. 

St. John s Hospital, built in the reign of Henry II., 
by Edmund Archdeacon of Coventry ; yearly value 
83/. 3s. 3rf., now worth 1,6632. 5s. ; granted to John 
Hales, Esq. 

Grey Friary, founded in the year 1234, by Ralph 
Earl of Chester; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to the 
Mayor and Bailiffs of the town. 

Carmelite Friary, erected in the year 1342, by Sir 
John Poultney ; yearly income 11. 13s. 8</., now worth 
153/. 13s. 4d.; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Ralph 
Sadler. 

At NUN EATON. A Nunnery, founded in the reign of 
Henry II., by Robert Bossu Earl of Leicester ; income 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

2907. 5s. OJe7., now worth 5,8057. Os. 10d; granted, 32 
Henry VIII., to Sir Marmaduke Constable. 

At ERDBUIIY. An Austin Priory, built in the reign of 
Henry III., by Ralph de Sudley ; rents, 1227. 8s. 6d. t now 
worth 2,4487. 105. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. 

At HEANWOOD. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in the 
reign of Henry II., by Katelbern de Langdon ; income 21/. 
2s. 0|rf., now worth 4227. Os. lOrf. ; granted, 31 Henry 
VIII., to John Higford. 

At KEN IL WORTH. An Austin Priory, built in the year 
1122, by Geffrey de Clintone, Chamberlain to Henry I. ; 
income 5387. 19s., now worth 10,7797. ; granted, by Henry 
VIII., to Sir Andrew Flamock. 

At MONK S KIRBY. An Alien Priory, founded in the 
year 1077, by Gosfred de Wirchia ; income 2207. 3s. 4d., 
ROW worth 4,4037. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII, to 
Trinity College, Cambridge. 

At KNOLL. A College, built 4 Henry V., by Lady Eli 
zabeth Clinton, income 187. 5s. 6d., now worth 3657. 10s. 

At MAX STOKE. An Austin Priory, built in the year 
1336, by Sir William de Clinton Earl of Huntingdon ; in 
come 1297. 11s. 8rf., now worth 2,5917. 4s. 2c7. ; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to" Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

AtMEREVAL. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 
1148, by Robert Earl of Ferrers; income 3037. 10s., now 
worth 6,0707. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII. to Walter Lord 
Ferrers. 

At OLDBURY. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in the 
reign of William the Conqueror, \>y Walter de Hastings ; 
income 67. Os. 10<1, now worth 1207. 16s. 8c7. ; granted, 33 
Hemy VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At PIN LEY. A Cistercian Nunnery, built in the reign of 
Henry I., by Robert de Pilardinton ; yearly value 277. 
14s. 7t/., now worth 5547. 11s. 8c7.; granted, 36 Henry 
VIII., to William Wigston, Esq. 

At POLLESWORTH. A Benedictine Nunnery, built by- 
King Egbert for Modwenna, a holy woman lately come from 
Ireland ; here his own daughter, St. Editha, presided ; in- 



LIST OF 

come 87l.l6s.3d., now worth 1,7561. 5s. ; granted, 36 
Henry VIII., to Francis Goodyere, Esq. 

At STONELY. A Cistercian Abbey, built by King 
Henry II., in the year 1154 ; income 178/. 2s. 5|c?., now 
worth 3,562/. 9s. 2d.~ granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. 

At STRATFORD. A College, founded about the year 
703 ; income 123J. 12s. 9d., now worth 2,472J. 15s. ; grant 
ed, 4 Edward VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 
Hospital, built in the reign of Henry II. 

At STUDLEY. An Austin Priory, built in the reign of 
Henry II. ; rents 18 II. 3s. 6d., now worth 3,623. ; grant 
ed, 30 Henry VIII., to Sir Edmund Knightly. 

At TIIELESFORD. A Maturine Friary, founded in the 
reign of John, by William de Cherlecote; income 23. 10s., 
now worth 470J ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to William 
Whorwood, Esq., and William Walter. 

At WARMINGTON, An Alien Priory, founded in the 
reign of Henry I., by Paul de Prattelles ; granted, 35 
Henry VIII., to William arid Francis Seldon, Esqs. 

At WARWICK. An Austin Priory, built in the reign of 
Henry I., by Henry of Newburgh ; income 49 /. 13s. 6d. t 
now worth 9931. 10s. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to Thomas 
Hawkins. 

Hospital of Templars, built in the reign of Henry I., 
by Roger Earl of Warwick ; income 14/. 6s. 8d., now 
worth 286 J. 13s. 4d. 

St. James s College, built in the reign of Richard II. 

St. Mary s College, built before the time of William 
the Conqueror; income 247Z. 13s. Ojc?., now worth 
4,953Z. Os. Wd. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to the Bur 
gesses of Warwick. 

St. John s Hospital, built in the reign of Henry II., 
by William Earl of Warwick, for the entertainment of 
travellers and strangers ; income, 19/. 3s. 7c?., now 
worth 383Z. 11s. 8rf. ; granted, 27 Henry. VIII., to 
Antony Staughton. 

St. Michael s Hospital, founded in the reign of 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

Henry I., by Roger Earl of Warwick, for the sick ; in 
come 10Z. 19s. 10c/., now worth 219/. 16s. Sd. 

Black Friary, built in the reign of Henry III., by the 
Botelers, Lords of Sudley ; income 41. 18s. 6d., now 
worth 981 10s. ; granted, 5 Edward VI., to John Duke 
of Northumberland. 

Carmelite Friary, built 18 Edward III., by John 
Peyto, jun.; granted, 4 Edward VI., to John Earl of 
Warwick. 

At WOLFRICHESTON. An Alien Priory, built soon after 
the conquest, by Roger de Montgomery ; granted, 3 Ed 
ward VI., to Richard Field e and Richard Woodward. 

At WROXHALL. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in the 
reign of Henry I., by Hugh de Hatton ; yearly value 7SL 
10s. IJd, now worth 1,570/. 2s. 6d. ; granted, 36 Henry 
VIII. , to Robert Burgoin and John Scudamore. 



WESTMORELAND (COUNTY). 

At BROUGII. An Hospital, founded in the 16th century, 
by John Brunskill, with a chapel, and beds for travellers and 
other poor persons ; yearly income 11. 4s. 4c?., now worth 
144/. 6s. Sd. 

At HEP P. A Premonstratensian Abbey, built in the 
reign of Henry II., by Thomas Fitz Gospatrick ; yearly 
value 166Z. 10s. 6d., now worth 3,330/. 10s.; granted, 36 
Henry VIII., to Thomas Lord Wharton. 

At KIRK LEY. An Hospital for lepers, built before the 
time of Henry II. ; yearly income 61. 4s. 5c?., now worth 
124/. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to Alan Belling- 
ham and Alan Wilson. 



WILTS (COUNTY). 

At AMESBURY. A Nunnery, built by Alfrida Queen 
of Edgar; income 558/. 10s. 2d., now worth 11,170J. 



LIST OF 

3s. 4d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Edward Earl of 
Hertford. 

At AN STY. An Hospital of Hospitalers, built, 12 John, 
by Walter de Turbelville ; yearly income 811. Ss. 5d., now 
worth 1,6287. 8s. 4d.; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to John 
Zouch. 

At AVEBUUY. An Alien Priory, built in the reign of 
Henry I., by William de Tancervilla ; granted, 2 Edward 
VI., to Sir William Sharington. 

At BHADENSTOKE. An Austin Priory, founded in tlie 
year 1142, by Walter de Evreux ; yearly value 2707. 
105. 8c?., now worth 5,4107. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 38 Henry 
VIII., to Richard Pexall. 

At MAYDEN BRA DELE Y. An Austin Priory, founded 
in the reign of Stephen, by Manasses Biset ; yearly value 
1977. \Ss..8d., now worth 3,9587. 13s. 4d. -, granted, 29 
Henry VIII., to Sir Edward Seymore. 

At CALX. An Hospital, built in the reign of Henry III. ; 
inQome 27. 2s, 8d., now worth 42 1, 13s. 4d. 

At CiiARLfeTOtf. An Alien Priory, built in the year 
1187, by Reginald de Pavely ; yearly income 227., now 
worth 4407, ; granted, 2 Edward VI., to Sir William Shar 
ington. 

AtCosHAM. An Alien Priory, built in the reign of 
William the Conqueror; yearly income 227. 13s. 4c7., now 
worth 4537. 6s. 8c7. ; granted, 6 James 1., to Philip Moore. 

At CRICKLADE. An Hospital, built in the reign of 
Henry II F. ; yearly income 41. Is. lO^c?.. now worth 877. 
I7s.6d. 

At EDINDON. Bonhommes, built about the year 1347 ; 
rents 5217. 12s. 5\d. 9 now worth 10,4327. 9s. 2d. ; granted, 
33 Henry VIII., to William Pawlet, Lord St. John. 

At ESTOX. A Trinitarian Friary, i founded for the re* 
demption of captives, in the reign of Henry III., by 
Stephen Archdeacon of Salisbury ; yearly income 557. 
J4s. 4c?., now worth 1,1147.6s. 8d. ; granted, 6 James I., 
to Edward Earl of Hertford. 

At FARLEIGH. A Cluniac Priory, built in the year 1125 r 
by Humphrey de Bohun ; yearly income 1527. 3s. 7c?. ? now 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

worth 3,0437. lls. 8a 7 .; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to Si* 
Edward Seymore. 

At HEYTF.SBURY. A College, built in the year 1300 ; 
yearly income 287. 12s. 60?., now worth 5727. 10s. 

Hospital, founded about the year 1470, by Lady 

Margaret Hungerford, for twelve poor men and one 

poor woman ; yearly income 387. 4s. 7c7., now worth 

7647. 11s. Sd. ; it stands to this day. 

At TOY CHURCH. An Austin Priory, built in the reign 

of Henry II. ; yearly income 1 337. Os. 7|o?., now worth 

2,6607. 12s. Gd. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John Banvick. 

At KEINTON. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded 2 
Henry II. ; yearly income 387. 3s. lO^c?., now worth 7637. 
17s. 6d. ; granted. 30 Henry VIII., to Sir John Long. 

At KING s WOOD. A. Cistercian Abbey, built in the 
year 1139, by William de Berkly ; yearly income 2547. 
lls. 2c?, now worth 5,0917. 3s. 4c7. ; granted, 2 Elizabeth, 
to Sir John Thynne. 

At LA COCK. An Austin Priory, built in the year 1232, 
by Ela Countess of Salisbury ; yearly income 2037. 12s. 3d, 
now worth 4,0727.5s.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir 
William Sharington. 

At LONGLEAT. An Austin Priory ; granted, 32 Henry 
VIII., to Sir John Thynne. 

At MALMESBURY. A Benedictine Abbey, built in the 
year 675, in the place of an ancient Nunnery ; yearly in 
come 8037. 17s. 7rf., now worth 16,0777. lls. 8c7. ; granted, 
36 Henry VIII., to William Stump. 

At MARLEBUUGII. A Gilbertine Abbey, founded in the 
reign of John ; yearly income 387. 19s. 2c?., now worth 
7797. 3s. 4d. ; granted "to Anthony Stringer. 

Hospital, St. John s, built, 16 John, by Mr. Leve- 
rioth ; yearly income 67. 18s. 4c7., now worth 1387. 
6s. Sd. 

Carmelite Friary, built in the year 1316, by John 
Godwin and William Ramesbesch ; granted, 34 Henry 
VIII., to John Pye and Robert Brown. 

At PULTON. A Gilbertine Priory, built, 21 Edward III., 
by Sir Thomas Seymor; yearly value 207. 3s. 2d., HOJ.V 
x 5 



LIST OF 

worth 403?. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Sir 
Thomas Stroude, Walter Erie, and John Paget. 

At TEMPLE ROCKLEY. An Hospital of Templars, built 
2 Henry II., by John Mareschall ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., 
to Sir Edward Bainton. 

At SALISBURY. A Cathedral Church, the building of 
which took forty years ; was finished in the year 12.58 ; the 
revenues of the Bishop made 1,367?. 11s. 6c?., of the Chap 
ter 601?. 12s. ; both would now make 39,383?. 10s. 

St. Edmond s College, founded by Walter de la 
Wyle, Bishop of Salisbury, in the year 1270 ; revenues 
94?. 5s., now worth 1,885?. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., 
to William St. Barbe. 

College de Vaux, and possessions ; granted, 35 
Henry VIII., to Sir Michael Lister. 

Vicar s College, incorporated 11 Henry IV. ; reve 
nues 47?. 18s. Ojrf, now worth 958?. Os. IQd. 

Harnham College, founded in the year 1220, by Bi 
shop Poore ; rents 25?. 2s. 2e?., now worth 502?. 3s. 4d. ; 
it was for the poor, and still continues. 

Trinity College, founded for the sick, 17 Richard II., 
by John Chandeler. 

Dominican Friary, founded by King Edward I. ; 
granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John Pollard and William 
Byrte. 

Franciscan Friary, built by a Bishop of the town ; 
granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John Wroth. 

At STAXLEGH. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 
1154, by King Henry II. and his mother Maud; rents 
222/. 19s. 4d. f now worth 4,459?. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 28 
Henry VIII., to Sir Edward Bainton. 

At UPHAVEN. An Alien Priory, built in the reign of 
Henry I. ; granted, 4 James I., to Francis and A. Anderson. 

At WILTON. A Benedictine Nunnery, built by King 
Edgar, in the year 871, on the ruins of an Abbey built 773, 
and destroyed by the Danes; yearly revenues 652?. lls. 5Jc?., 
now worth 13/051?. 9s. 2c?.; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to 
Sir William Herbert. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

St. Giles Hospital, built by Queen Adelicia, wife of 
Henry I.; yearly value 51. 13s. 4d., now worth 1137. 
65. Sd. 

St. John s Hospital, built in the year 1217, for a 
Prior and poor brethren; rents 147. 13s. lOjd., now 
worth 393 J. 17s. 6c7. 



WORCESTER (COUNTY). 

At ASTLEY. An Alien Priory, built in the reign of 
William the Conqueror, by Ralph de Tedenei j granted, by 
King Henry VIII., to Sir Ralph Sadler. 

At BORDESLEY. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 
1138, by the Empress Maud; rents 392/. 8s. 6d, now 
worth 7,8487. 10s.; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Andrew 
Lord Winsor. 

At COKEHILL. A White Nunnery, built in the reign of 
Richard I., by Ger vase of Canterbury ; rents 347. 15s. lie?., 
now worth 6951. 18s. 4d. , granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Nicholas Fortescue, whose posterity now inhabit the ancient 
Priory-house. 

At DODFORD. A Premonstratensian Cell, built by King 
Henry II. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to John Dudley, who 
sold it to John Fownes. 

At DROITWICH. An Hospital, built 13 Edward I., by 
William de Dovere, Pastor of Dodderhill; rents 2 II. 
11s. Sd., now worth 4317. 13s. 4d. 

At ELMELY. A College, built in the reign of Edward II., 
by Guy Earl of Warwick ; granted, 37 Henry VIII. ; to Sir 
Thomas Hobby. 

At EVESIIAM. A Benedictine Abbey, founded and 
endowed 701, by Egwin Bishop of Worcester ; yearly value 
1,2687. 9s. 9d., now worth 25,3697. 15s.; granted, 34 
Henry VIII., to Philip Hobby, Esq. 

At MALVERN MAJOR. A Benedictine Priory, founded 
l^nn, W Tn tbe Confessor ; rent 3757. Os. 6id., now worth 
7,5007 10s. 10d.; granted, 36 Henry VIH, to William 
rynnok. 



LIST 



At MALVERN MINOR. A Benedictine Cell, founded 
in the year 1171, by Joceline and Edred, brothers, who 
were afterwards Priors there; rents 102Z. 10s. 9%d., now- 
worth 2,050/. 15s. U)d.; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to 
Richard Andrews and Nicholas Temple. 

At PERSHORE. A Benedictine Abbey, founded in the 
year 689, by Oswald, nephew of King Ethelred ; rents. 
666J. 13s., now worth 13,333/.; granted, 36 Henry VIH., 
to William and Francis Sheldon. 

At WESTWOOD. A Fontevrauld Nunnery, built in the 
reign of Henry ll.,by Eustachiade Say ; rents 751. 18s.Ho?., 
now worth 1,518/. 17s. 6^.; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to 
John Pakinton. 

At WORCESTER. A Cathedral Church, built in the 
year 964, by Bishop Oswald, which became afterwards a 
Monastery; rents 1,290J. 10s. 6d., now worth 25,810J. 
10s. lOrf. 

W histon Nunnery, built by a Bishop of Worcester ; 
rents 561. 3s. Id., now worth 1,123/. 11s. 80?.; grant 
ed, 35 Henry VIII., to Richard Callowhile. 

St. Oswald s Hospital, founded by Bishop Oswald 
himself, before the year 1268, for the poor ; with re 
venues 15/. 18s., now worth 318/. ; granted, by Henry 
VIII., to Christ Church, Oxford. 

A Dominican Friary, founded by Beauchamps of 
Powike; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to the Bailiffs and 
Citizens of Worcester. 

A Franciscan Friary, built in the year 1268, by 
Charles of Warwick; granted, 31 Henry VIII. , to the 
Bailiffs, &c. of Worcester. 



YORK (COUNTY). 

At NORTH ALLERTON. St. James s Hospital, founded 
an the reign of Henry II., by Hugh Pusar Bishop of Dur 
ham, for the poor brethren ; rents 56/. 2s. 2c?., now worth 
l,122f. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Christ Church, 
Oxford. 

Maison de Dieu, built in the year 1476, by Richard 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

Moore, draper, for thirteen poor persons; four only are 
now supported on it. 

A Carmelite Friary, built in the year 1354, by 
Thomas Hatfield, Bishop of Durham. 

At NUN APPLETON. A Cistercian Nunnery, built ia 
the reign of King Stephen, by Adeliz de St. Quintin ; rents 
837. 55. 9d., now worth 1,6651. 15s.; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII., to Robert Darknall. 

At ARDEN. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in the year 
1150, by Peter de Hotton ; rents 13/. 7s. 4c/., now worth 
267/. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Thomas Culpeper. 

At ARTIIINGTON. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in the 
time of King .Stephen, by Peter de Ardington; rents 191., 
now worth 380Z. ; granted, 34 Henry VIII. , to Archbishop 
Cranmer of Canterbury. 

At NETHER AULCASTER. A College, founded by 
Robert Stillington; rents 27/. 13s. 4c?., now worth 5531. 
6s. Sd. ; granted, 2 Edward VI., to John Hulse and 
William Pendred. 

At BAG BY. An Hospital for the sick and poor. 

At BASE DALE HOTON. A Cistercian Nunnery, built 
in the year 1162, by Ralph de Nevill ; yearly value 21/. 
19s. 4d., now worth 439/. 6s. 8d. granted, 36 Henry VIII., 
to Ralph Bulmer and John Thynde. 

At BAWTREE. An Hospital, built in the year 1316, by 
Robert Moreton, Esq., for the poor; rents 6/. 6s. 8d. t now 
worth 126. 13s. 4d. ; yet in being. 

At BEG A RE. An Alien Priory, built in the reign of 
Henry III. ; granted to Eton college. 

At B EVE RLE Y. A College, built in the year 700, by 
John Archbishop of York. After various alterations, it 
supported, at the dissolution, one Provost, eight Preben 
daries, a Chancellor, Precentor, seven Rectors, Choral, 
nine Vicars Choral, many Chantry Priests, Clerks, Choris 
ters, officers and servants. Revenues 34:51. 13s. 2f/., now 
worth 6,913J. Is. Sd. ; granted, 2 Edward VI., to Michael 
Stanhope and John Bellew. 

A House of Hospitalers, built in the year 1201, by 
Sibylla deValoniis; rents 1677. 10s., now worth 3,350/.; 
granted, 36 Henry VIII., to William Barkley. 



LIST OF 

St. Giles s Hospital, built before the conquest by 
a Mr. Wulse ; rents 87., now worth 1607.; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Thomas Earl of Rutland. 

St. Nicholas s Hospital, built before the year 1286 ; 
yearly value 51. 14s. 6<i., now worth 1147. 10s. 

A Dominicans Friary, founded before the year 1311; 
granted, 36 Henry VIII., to John Pope and Antony 
Foster. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1297, by 
William Liketon and Henry Weighton ; granted, 32 
Henry VIII. , to Thomas Culpeper. 
At BOLTON. An Austin Priory, founded in the year 
1120, by William Meschines ; yearly value 2127. 3s. 4c?., 
now worth 4,2437. 6s. 8d.; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to 
Henry Earl of Cumberland. 

At MONK BRETTON. A Cluniac Priory, founded in the 
reign of Henry II., by Adam Fitz Swain ; rents 323/. 8s. 2e7., 
now worth 6,4687. 3s. 4c?. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to 
William Blithman. 

At B RUN NUM. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
reign of Henry III., by Roger de Merley Lord Morpeth ; 
rents 107. 3s. 3d., now worth 2027. 5s.; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII. , to Robert Tyrwhit. 

At BURLINGTON. An Austin Priory, built in the reign 
of Henry I., by Walter de Gant ; rents 6827. 13s. 9d., 
now worth 13,6537. 15s. 

At BYLAND. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 
1143, by Roger de Mowbray; rents 2957. 5s. 4rf., now 
worth 5,9057. 6s. &d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Wil 
liam Pykering. 

At CORHAM. A Premonstratensian Abbey, built in the 
reign of Henry II., by Ralph Fitz Robert, Lord of Middle- 
ham; rents 2077. 14s. 8e7, now worth 4,1547. 13s. Ad. 

At DON CASTER. A Franciscan Friary, erected before 
the year 13 15 ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to William 
Gifford and Michael Welbore. 

At DRAX. An Austin Priory, built before the reign of 
Henry I., by William Paynel ; "rents 1817. 18s. 3|c?., now 
worth 3,6387. 5s. 10c7.; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Sir 
Marmaduke Constable. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At EGLESTONE. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded 
in the reign of Henry II.; by Ralph de Multon; rents 
36/. 8s. 3d., now worth 728/. 5s. ; granted, 2 Edward VI., 
to Robert Shelley. 

At ELRETON. A Cistercian Nunnery, built in the reign 
of Henry II., by Warnerius Dapifer, Earl of Richmond; 
rents 157. 10s. 6 d., now worth 31 0/. 10s.; granted, 33 
Henry VIII., to John Aske. 

At ELRETON ON THE DERWENT. A Gilbertine Priory, 
built in the year 1212, by William Fitz Peter, under con 
dition that they would maintain thirteen poor persons; rents 
787. Os. 10d., now worth 1,560/. 16s. Sd. ; granted, 33 
Henry VIII., to John Aske. 

At ESSEHOLT, A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in the 
year 1172; rents 19/., now worth 380/.; granted, 1 Edward 
VI., to Henry Thompson. 

At NORTH FERRY. An Austin Priory, valued yearly 
957. 11s. 7|d, now worth 1,9117. 12s. 6^.; granted, 32 
Henry VIII., to Thomas Culpeper. 

At FOUNTAINS, in the Deanery of West Riding. A 
Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 1132; rents 1,1737. 
Os. 7|c?., now worth 23,5607. 12s. 6f7. ; granted, 32 Henry 
VIII., to Sir Richard Gresham. 

AtGisEBURNE. An Austin Priory, founded in the year 
1129, by Robert de Brus ; rents 712/. 6s. 6e7., now worth 
14,2467. 10s.; granted, 4 Elizabeth, to Sir Thomas 
Chaloner. 

At GROSMONT. An Alien Priory, built in the reign of 
John, by Joanna daughter of William Fossard ; rents 147. 
2s. 8d., now worth 2827. 13s. 4rf. ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., 
to Edward Wright. 

At HALTEMPRICE. An Austin Priory, founded 15 Ed 
ward II., by Thomas Lord Wake of Lyddel ; yearly value 
1787. Os. lOlrf., now worth 3,5607. 17s. 6c7. ; granted, 32 
Henry VIII., to Thomas Culpeper. 

At HAN DALE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
year 1133, by William Percy ; rents 207. 7s. 8e?., now worth 
4077. 13s. 4c7. ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Ambrose 
Beckwith. 

At HANEHOPE. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in the 



LIST OF 

year 1170, by William de Clarefai; rents 857. 6s. lid., 
now worth 1,706/. 18s. 4d. ; granted, 6 Edward VI., to 
Francis Aislaby. 

At HEDON. An Hospital, founded in the time of King 
John, by Alan Ouberni; rents I II. 18s. 4c?., now worth 
238J. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 7 Edward VI., to Robert Constable. 

At HELAGH PARK. An Austin Priory, founded in the 
year 1218, by Berthram Haget; rents 86/. 5s. 9d., now 
worth 1,725/. 15s.; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to James 
Gage. 

At HEM ING BURGH. A College, founded in the year 
1426; rents 36 J. Is., now worth 72 R 

At HOWDEN. A College, founded in the year 1266, by 
Robert Bishop of Durham ; rents 131. 6s., now worth 266/. 

At TEMPLE HURSTE. A Hospital of Templars, founded 
in the year 1152, by Ralph de Hostings ; granted to Lord 
Darcy. 

At JOREVAL. A Cistercian Abbey, founded about the 
year 1156, by Conan Duke of Richmond; yearly value 
4551. IQs. 5d., now worth 9,1 10/. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 36 
Henry VJIL, to Matthew Earl of Lenox. 

At KELDON. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in the 
reign of Henry I., by Robert Stutevile ; rents 29/. 6s. Id., 
now worth 586/. Is. 8rf. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to 
Ralph Earl of Westmorland. 

At NUN KELYNGE. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in 
the reign of King Stephen, by Agnes de Archis; rents 50/. 
17.v. 2d, now worth 1,017Z. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 32 Henry 
VIII., to Richard Gresham. 

At KILLINGWOLDGROVE. An Hospital, founded for 
women before the year 1 169; rents 121. 3s. 4rf., now worth 
"2431. 6s. 8d 

At KINGSTON. A Cistercian Prior}*, built about the 
time of Richard III., by Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk; 
rents 23R 17s. 3d., now worth 4,637J. 5s. ; granted, 6 Ed 
ward VI., to Edward Lord Clinton. 

Grigg s and Mariners Hospitals ; one for Priests, 
and the other for Sailors ; founded by John Grigge ; 
valued, 26 Henry VIII., at 10J., now worth 400 /. 
yearly. They are in being to this day. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

Pole s Hospital, founded in the year 1 384, by Michael 
de la Pole, for thirteeen poor men and so many poor 
women; rents 10Z., now worth 200Z. ; still in being. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded by King Edward I., 
or by some others ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to John 
Henneage. 

A Dominican Friary, granted, 36 Henry VI II,, to 
John Broxholm. 

At KIRK ii AM. An Austin Priory, founded in the year 
1121, by Walter Espec ; rents 300/. 15s. 6d., now worth 
2,015/. 10s.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Henry Knyvet. 

At KIRKLEGHES. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in 
the reign of Henry II., by Reynerus Flandersis ; rents 20/. 
7s. 8rf., now worth 407Z. 13s.4d. ; granted, 36 Henry VIII., 
to John Tasburgh and Nicholas Savill. 

At KIRKSTALL. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 
1147, by Henry de Lacy ; rents 512/. 13s. 4f2., now worth 
10,253*. 6s. 8d. 

At KNARESBURGH. A Trinitarian Friary, built in the 
reign of Henry III., by Richard Earl of Cornwall, and King 
ofthe Romans; rents 351. 10s. lid., now worth 71 0/. 18s. 4rf., 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to Francis of Shrewsbury. 

At LAYSINGBY. A College, founded, 18 Edward I., by 
John de Lythegraynes ; rents 9/. 6s. 8d., now worth 186/. 
13s. 4d. 

At OLD MALTON. A Gilbertine Priory, founded in the 
year 1150, by Eustace Fitz John; rents 257/. 7s., now 
worth 5,147/. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Robert Hole- 
gate, Bishop of Landaff. 

At LITTLE MARCIS. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in 
the year 1163, by Roger de Clere ; rents 26/. 6s. Sc?., now 
worth 526/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Robert 
Holgate, Bishop of Landaff; after him to the Bishop of 
York. 

At MARTON. An Austin Priory, founded in the reign 
of Henry II., by Bertram de Buhner ; rents 183/. 12s. 4d., 
now worth 3,672/. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to the 
Archbishop of York. 

At MARYKE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
reign of Henry II., by Roger de Asac; rents 64/. 16s. 9d. 3 



LIST OF 

now worth 1,296J. 155.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to 
John Uvedale. 

At M ELS A. A Cistercian Abby, founded in the year 
1150, by William le Gross Earl of Albemarle; rents 4451. 
10s. 5d., now worth 8,910Z. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 3 Edw. VI., 
to John Earl of Warwick. 

At MIDDLEHAM. A College, founded in the year 1476, 
by Richard Duke of Gloucester, afterwards King Richard 
III. ; rents 161. 9s. 4d., now worth 329 /. 3s. 4d. 

At MIDDLESBUIIGH. A Benedictine Cell, founded in 
the reign of Henry I., by Robert de Bruce; rents 21. 
13s. 8d., now worth 4331. 13s. 4d.-, granted, 6 Elizabeth, 
to Thomas Reve. 

At MOLESLEY. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded by 
Henry II., in the year 1167; rents 32/. 6s. 2d. 9 now worth 
6461. 3s. 4d. ; granted to the Archbishop of York. 

At NUN MONKETON. A Benedictine Nunnery, built in 
the reign of Stephen, by William de Arches ; rents 851. 
Us. 8d. t now worth 1,7141. 13s. 4d.; granted, 29 Henry 
VIII. , to John Lord Latimer. 

At MOUNTGRACE. A Carthusian Priory, founded in 
the year 1396, by Thomas de Holland, Duke of Surrey; 
rents 323/. 2s. lOlrf., now worth 6,462Z. 17s.6d.; granted, 
32 Henry VIII., to Robert Strangeways. 

At MOUNT ST. JOHN. A House of Hospitalers, founded 
in the reign of Henry I., by William Percy; rents 102/. 
13s. lOd. now worth 2,053/. 16s. 8d. ; granted, 34 Henry 
VIII., to the Archbishop of York. 

At NEWBURGH. An Austin Priory, built in the year 
1145, by Roger de Moubr ay ; rents 4571. 13s. 5d., now 
worth 9,153J. 8s. 4d. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to Mar 
garet Simson and Ant. Bellasis. 

At NEWLAND. A House of Hospitalers, founded by 
King John; rents 202/. 3s. 8d. now worth 4,043/. I3s.4d. ; 
granted, 36 Henry VIII., to Francis Jobson and Andrew 
Dudley. 

At NEWTON. A Hospital, built in the year 1179, by 
William Gross, Earl of Albemarle ; rents 2H. Os. 2a., now 
worth 4201. 3s, 4d. ; granted, 16 Elizabeth, to John 
Stanhope. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At NOSTELL. An Austin Priory, built in the reign of 
Henry II., by Robert de Lacy; rents 606/. 9s. 3d., now 
worth 12,129Z. 5s. ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Thomas 
Leigh. 

At OVETOX. A Gilbertine Priory, founded 5 John, by 
Alan de Wilton; rents III. 2s. 8c(., now worth 222J. 
1 3s. 4d. 

At PONTFRACT. A Cluniac Priory, built in the time of 
William Rufus, by Robert de Lacy; rents 472/. 16s. IJc?., 
now worth 9,456 J. 2s. 6d.; granted, 7 Edward VI., to Wil 
liam Lord Talbot. 

St. Clement s College, founded in the reign of Wil 
liam Rufus, by Ilbert de Lacy. 

Knolles College and Almshouse. Sir Robert Knolles 
founded, in the year 1385, a College for a Master and 
six Fellows ; and adjoining it an Almshouse for a 
Master, two Chaplains, and 13 poor men and women; 
revenues 200/. 5s. 10J(Z., now worth 4,G05/. Os. lOd. 

St. Nicholas Hospital, founded in the reign of 
Henry I., by Robert de Lacy ; rents 97/. 13s. 4d., now 
worth 1,953/. 6s. Sd. ; it maintained until the dissolu 
tion one Chaplain and 1 3 poor persons. 

Dominican Friary, built before the year 1266, by 
Simon Pyper; granted, 36 Henry VIII., to William 
Clifford and Michael Wildbore. 

Franciscan Friary. 

At RERECIIOSS HOSPITAL. An Hospital, built in the 
year 1171, by Ralph de Multon ; granted, 7 Edward VI., 
to William Buckton and Roger Marshall. 

At RIBSTANE. An Hospital of Templars, founded in the 
reign of Richard I., by Robert Lord Ross ; rents 265/. 
9s. Q\d., now worth 5,359/. 10s. lOd. ; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII., to Charles Duke of Suffolk. 

At RICHMOND. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the year 
1100, by Wymar, Steward to the Earl of Richmond; rents 
43Z. 16s. Sd., now worth 876(. 13s. 4d.; granted, 4 Ed 
ward VI., to Edward Lord Clinton. 

A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in the year 
1151, by Roald, the Constable of Richmond; rents 



LIST or 

188/. 165. 2d., now worth 3,776Z. 3s. 4d.; granted, 
14 Elizabeth, to John Stanhope. 

St. Nicholas s Hospital, founded by King Henry II. ; 
rents 107. yearly, now worth 200/. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1258, by 
Ralph Fitz Randal, Earl of Middleham ; granted, 36 
Henry VIII., to John Banaster and William Metcalf. 

At RIPPON". A College, built and endowed in the reign 
of William the Conqueror, by Archbishop Alfred, on the 
ruins of a Monastery that had been founded before the year 
661 by Alchfrid, king of Northumbers, but afterwards burnt 
down in the civil wars ; seven Prebends made here at the 
dissolution 36 II. 19 s. 6d., six Vicars Choral 36/., other re 
venues 471. 16s. 3d.; total 445/. 15s. 3d.; now worth 
8,9 1 51. 5s. 

St. John s Hospital, founded before 4 John, by the 
Archbishops of York ; rents 12/. Os. 4cZ., now worth 
240/. 6s. Sd. 

Magdalen Hospital, founded by the Archbishops of 
York for lepers ; rents 24Z. Qs.. Id., now worth 480/. 
lls.Sd. 

At RIVER. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1131, by Walter Espec; rents 351/. 14s. 6J., now worth 
7,134f. 10*.; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Thomas Earl 
of Rutland. 

At ROCH. A Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 1147, 
by Richard Fitz Turgis; rents 27R 19s. 4d., now worth 
5,439J. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 38 Henry VIII., to William 
Ramesden arid Thomas Vavasor. 

At ROSED ALE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
reign of Richard I., by Robert de Stutevile ; rents 4U. 
13s. 8d., now worth 833/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 30 Henry 
VIII., to Ralph Earl of Westmoreland. 

At SALLAY. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1 146, by William de Percy ; rents 22 II. 15s. Sd. t now worth 
4,435/. 13s. 4d. 

At SELBY. A Benedictine Abbey, founded in the year 
1069, by William the Conqueror; rents 819/. 2s. 6c?., now 
worth 16,382 J. 10s.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir Ralph 
Sadler. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At SINNINGTIIWAITE. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded 
in the year 1160, by Bertram Haget ; rents 62Z. 6s., now 
worth 1,2461. ; granted, 30 Henry VIII., to Robert Tempest. 

At SNAITH. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the year 
1106, by Girard Archbishop of York; granted, 4 Edward 
VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

At SPROTBURGH. An Hospital, founded in the year 
1363, by Mr. Fitz Williams; rents 9/. 13s. lie?., now- 
worth 193J. 16s. Sd. 

At SUTTON. A College ; valued at 13Z. 18*. Sd. yearly, 
now worth 27 8 1. 13. 4d. 

An Hospital; valued at 71. 18s. 4d., now worth 
15BI. 6s. Bd. 

At SWIJTHEY. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in the 
reign of Stephen, by Robert de Verli; rents 134Z. 6s. 9d., 
now worth 2,686/. 15s.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir 
Richard Gresham. 

At TIIICKIIED. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded in the 
reign of Richard I., by Roger Fitz Roger; rents 23/. 12s. 2rf., 
now worth 472/. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to John 
Aske. 

At TICKHILL. A College, founded by Eleanor, Queen 
of Henry II. ; granted, 4 Edward VI., to Francis Earl of 
Shrewsbury. 

At TOCKWITH. An Austin Cell, founded in the year 
1114, by Jeffery Fitz Pain; rents 8/., now worth 160J.; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Thomas Leigh. 

At WARTER. An Austin Priory, built in the year 1132, 
by Jeffery Fitz Pain; rents 22K 3s. 10c?., now worth 4,423/. 
16s. 80?. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Thomas Earl of 
Rutland. 

At WALTON. A Gilbertine Priory, succeeded in the 
year 1150 a Nunnery that was built 686 ; income 453/. 
7s. Bd., now worth 9,067/. 13s. 4d. ; granted, 3 Edward 
VI., to John Earl of Warwick. 

At WELLE. An Hospital, founded in the year 1342, by 
Sir Ralph de Neville ; income 65Z. 5s. 7c?., now worth 
1,305/. Us. Bd. 

At WIIITTEY. A Benedictine Abbey grew up in the 



LIST OF 

time of Henry I., instead of an ancient one built by St. 
Hilda in the year 65^; income 5051. 9s. lc?., now worth 
10,109/. Is. Sd. ; granted, 4 Edward VI., to John Earl of 
Warwick. 

At WIDKIRK. An Austin Cell, built in the reign of 
Henry I., by William Earl of Warren and others ; income 
47Z. Os. 4c?., now worth 940/. 6s. Sd. ; granted, 7 Edward 
VI., to George Talbot and Robert Savill. 

At WILBURFOSSE. A Benedictine Nunnery, founded 
in the year 1153, by Alan de Cotton ; income 28 /. 8s. 8c?., 
now worth 5681. 1 3s. 4d. ; granted, 7 Edward VI., to George 
Gale. 

AtWYKHAM. A Cistercian Nunnery, founded in the 
year 1153, by Pain Fitz Osbert de Wykham ; rents 251. 
17s. 6d., now worth 5111 10s.; granted, 32 Henry VIII., 
to Francis Poole. 

At YARUM. An Hospital, founded before the year 1 185, 
by the Brus family ; income 5L, now worth 100/. 

Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1271, by 
Peter de Brus ; surrendered by Miles Wilcock, Prior, 
five Friars and Novices, 1539. 

At YORK. A Cathedral, built in the year 1137, by the 
care of Archbishops Roger, Romane, Milton, and Thoresby, 
in the place of a Church originally founded, 627, by King 
Edwin, on his conversion to Christianity, but was burnt 
down in 741 ; yearly revenues of the Archbishop 2,035/. 
3s. 7d., Canons 4391. 2s. 6d., Dean 308 J. 10s.7d.; total 
2,772f. 16s. Sd. ; now worth 55,456*. 13s. 4d. 

St. Mary s, a Benedictine Abbey, founded and en 
dowed by William Rufus, in the year 1088 ; income 
2085/. Is. 5%d., now worth 41,70U 9s. 2<*. 

St. Clement s, a Benedictine Convent, or Nunnery, 
founded in the year 1130, westward of the town, by 
Archbishop Thurston ; revenues 55/. Us. 1 Id., now 
worth 1,11H. 18s. 4d. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to 
Edward Ship with. 

St. Andrew s, a Gilbertine Priory, founded in the 
year 1200, by Hugh Murduc ; income 57/. 5s, 9d., 
now worth 1,145/. 15s.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to 
John Bellow and John Broxholm 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

Trinity, or Christ Church, an Alien Priory, founded 
in the year 1089, by Ralph Painell ; yearly income 
196/. 17s. 2d, } now worth 3,937*. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 34 
Henry VIII. , to Leonard Beckwith. 

All Saints, a Benedictine Cell, built by the bounty 
of William Rufus ; completely demolished at the Re 
formation, so that it could not be ascertained where it 
stood. 

Beddern, or Vicar s College, founded in the year 
1252, by Walter Gray, Archbishop, for the Choristers 
and other officers of the Cathedral ; revenues 255/. 
Is. 8d., now worth 5,107/. 13s. 

St. Sepulchre s College, founded in the year 1161, 
by Roger Archbishop of York; income 138/. 19s. 2|d., 
now worth 2,7791. 4s. 2d. 

St. William s College, founded in the year 1460, by 
Richard Neville, Earl of Northumberland, and his 
brother George Neville, Bishop of Exeter ; yearly in 
come 22/. 12s. 8rf., now worth 452/. I3s.4d.; granted, 
4 Edward VI., to Michael Stanhope and John Belloe. 

Boutham Hospital, founded in the, year 1314, by 
Robert Pykering Dean of York; income III. 6s. 80?., 
now worth 226/. 13s. 4d. 

Boutham Hospital, Minor, built in the year 1481, by 
John Gyseburgh ; rents 9/. 6s. 8d., now worth 186/. 
13s. 4d. 

Fossgate Hospital, founded 45 Edward III., by John 
de Rucliff, for the poor; income 6/. 13s. 4d. f now 
worth 133/. 6s. 8c?. ; still in being. 

St. Nicholas Hospital, said to have been founded 
by the Empress Maud, for leprous persons ; income 
29/. Is Ad., now worth 58 1/. 6s. 8d. 

St. Peter s, or Leonard s Hospital, founded by King 
Stephen, for a Master, 13 Brethren, four secular Priests, 
eight Sisters, 30 Choristers, two Schoolmasters, 206 
Beadmen, and six Servitors ; with revenues of 362/. 
lls. \\d. t now worth 7,25H. 2s. 6c?.; granted, 6 Eli 
zabeth, to Robert Lord Dudley ; it is now called the 
Mint Yard. 



LIST OF 

St. Thomas Hospital, founded before the year 1391, 
yet stands. 

An Austin Friary, founded in the year 1278, by 
Lord Scroop ; granted to Thomas Rawson. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded by King Henry II. 
and the City of York ; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Leonard Beck with. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded in the year 1255, by 
Lord Vesey and Lord Percy ; granted, 35 Henry VIII., 
to Ambrose Beckwith. 



WALES. 



ANGLESEY (COUNTY). 

At GLANNAGH. A Benedictine Priory, founded in an 
island in the east part of Anglesey in the year 1221, by 
Lleweline Prince of North Wales; income 401. 17s. 9|c, 
now worth S17/. 15s. lOd. ; granted, 6 Elizabeth, to John 
Moore. 

At HOLY HEAD. A College rose instead of a Monastery 
built in the year 380, by St. Kebius ; income 24/., now 
worth 480/. ; granted, 7 James I., to Francis Morrice and 
Francis Filips. 



BRECKNOCK (COUNTY). 

At BRECKNOCK. A Benedictine Priory, built in the 
reign of Henry I., by Bernard de Newmarch ; yearly in 
come 134/. 11s. 4c?., now worth 2,691Z. 6s. 8d. ; granted, 
by Henry VIII., to John ap Rice. 

A College, made of a Dominican Friary, is standing 
to this day. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



CARMARTHEN (COUNTY). 

At ABERGWILLY. A College, founded in the year 1287, 
by Thomas Beck, Bishop of St. David s ; rents 42*., now 
worth 840*. 

At ABELANDA. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1 143, by Bernard Bishop of St. David s ; yearly value 
153*. 17s. 2c*., now worth 3,077/. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 36 Henry 
VIII., to Henry Audely and John Cordel. 

At CAD WELL. A Benedictine Priory, founded in the 
year 1120, by Roger Bishop of Salisbury ; rents 29*. 10s., 
now worth 59 01. 

At CAERMARTHEX. An Austin Priory, founded before 
the year 1 148; rents 164*. Os. 4e?., now worth 3,280*. 6s. 8a.; 
granted, 35 Henry VIII. , to Richard Andrews and Nicholas 
Temple. 

A Franciscan Friary ; granted, 5 Edward VI., to 
Sir Thomas Gresham, 

At TALL A on. A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in 
the year 1197, by Rhese Griffith Price, of South Wales; 
income 153*. Is. 4c*., now worth 3,06 II. 6s. 8d. 



CAERNARVON (COUNTY). 

At BANGOR. A Cathedral Church, founded at some 
early time ; the revenues of the Bishopric were valued at 
131*. 16s. 4c*.,now worth 2,636*. 6s. Sd. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1276, and 
granted, 7 Edward VI., to Thomas Brown, and con 
verted into a Free School, 1557. 

AtBARDSEY, Isle of Birds. An Abbey, founded before 
the year 516; it produced great numbers of holy men; 
yearly income 56*. 6s. 2c*., now worth 1,126*. 3s. 4c*. ; 
granted, 3 Edward VI,, to John Earl of Warwick. 

At BETIIKELERT. An Austin Priory, founded very an 
ciently ; yearly value 69*. 3s. 8d., now worth 1 ,383*. 13s. 4c*.; 
granted, by Henry VIII., to Lord Radnor. 



LIST OF 



CARDIGAN (COUNTY). 

At CARDIGAN. A Benedictine Cell, with revenues of 
13/. 4s-. 9d., now worth 264 15s. ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., 
to William Cavendish. 

At LLANDEWI-BREVI. A College, founded in the year 
1187, by Thomas Beck, Bishop of St. David s, in honour 
of St. David, who preached at a Council held in 519, and 
thereby extinguished the Pelagian heresy; rents 3&/. 11s.,. 
uow worth 77 II. 

At LLANLEIR. A Cistercian Nunnery,, of yearly income 
57/. 5s. 4d., now worth 1,145/. 6s. Sd.; granted, 7 Ed 
ward VI., to William Sackville and John Dudley. 

At STRATA FLORIDA. A Cistercian Abbey, founded 
in the year 1 164, by Rhesus son of Griffith of South Wales ; 
income 122J. 6s. Sd., now worth* 2,446/. 13s. 4d. 



DENBIGH (COUNTY). 

At MA YNAN. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1283, by King Richard I. ; revenues 162/. 15s., now worth 
3,255/. ; granted, 5 Elizabeth, to Elezeus Wynne, in whose 
family it continues still. 

At RUTIIIN. A College, founded in the year 1310, by 
John de Grey Lord of Dyffryn, Clywd; granted, 4 Edward 
VI., to William Winlove and John Stevens. 

At DE VALLE CRUCIS LL AN EG WAST.. A Cistercian 
Abbey, founded in the year 1200, by Madox; ap Griffith 
Maylor, Prince of Powis ; income 21 31. 5s. 5d., now worth 
4,283J. 8s. 4d ; granted, 9 James, to Edward Wotton. 



FLINT (COUNTY). 

At ST. ASAPH. A Bishoprick, founded in_the sixth cen 
tury by a holy and good man, St. Asaph, or Hassaph. This 
See, and a Monastery that had been; also there, were ire- 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

quently destroyed and rebuilt during the wars between the 
English and Welsh; revenues 187/. 11$. 6e?., now woith 
3,75 U. 10s. 

At BASING WERK. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1131 by Ranulph Earl of Chester; rents 157/. 15s. 2c?., 
now worth 3,155Z. 3s. 4d. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to 
Henry ap Harry. 

At RHUDLAND. A Dominican Friary, founded in the 
year 1268; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Henry ap Harry. 



GLAxMORGAN (COUNTY). 

AtLLANDAFFE. A Bishopnck, founded about the year 
522, by St. Dubritius ; suffered much in the wars ; revenues 
242/. 75. Id., now worth 4,847Z. Is. 8d. 

At MORGAN. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1147, by Robert Earl of Gloucester ; rents 188/. 14$., now 
worth 3,774/. ; granted, 32 Henry VIII., to Sir Richard 
Moxell, and is now the property of Thomas Lord Marsel. 

At NETII. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the reign of 
Henry I., by Richard de Grainville ; rents 150/. 4s. 9d., 
now worth 3,004Z. its. ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Sir 
Richard Williams, alias Cromwell. 

At SWANSEY. An Hospital, founded in the year 1332, 
by Henry Bishop of St. David s; rents 20/., now worth 
400/. 

At WENXY. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the year 
1141, by Maurice of London; rents 591. 4s., now worth 
1184?.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Edward Carn. 



MERIONETH (COUNTY). 

At KINNER. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1200, by Lleweline the son of Gervase ; rents 5SI. 15s. 4^., 
now worth 1,1 75. 6s. Sd. 



Y 2 



LIST OF 



MONTGOMERY (COUNTY). 

At LLANLUGAN. A Cistercian Nunnery, f.mnded in the 
year 1239; rents 22Z. 13s. 8d., now worth 4531. 13s. 4d.; 
granted, 37 Henry VIII., to Sir Arthur Darcy. 

At YSTRAT MARCIIEL, or POLA. A Cistercian Abbey, 
founded in the year 1170, by Owen Keveliog; rents 73 /. 
7s. 3d., now worth 1,4671. 5s.; granted, 8 Elizabeth, to 
Rowland Howard and Thomas Dixton. 



PEMBROKE (COUNTY). 

At CALDEY. A Tyrone Cell, the gift of Robert Fitz 
Martin s mother ; rents 51. , now worth 100/. 

At ST. DAVID S. A Bishoprick, founded by St. Patrick 
about 470 ; underwent several convulsions afterwards; re 
venues at the dissolution W31. 14s. 10c?., now worth 3,874/. 
16s. Sd. 

A College, founded in the year 1365, by John Duke 
of Lancaster; revenues 106/. 3s. 6d. t now worth 2,123 J. 
10s.; dissolved by Edward VI. 

* At ST. DOGMAEL. A Tyrone Abbey, founded in the 
reign of Henry I., by Robert Fitz Martin ; rents 87/. 8s. 6d., 
now worth I,748/. 10s.; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to John 
Bradshaw. 

At HAVERFORD. An Austin Priory, founded in the 
year 1200, by Bobert of Haverford Lord of the place ; rents 
135Z. 6s. !(/., now worth 2,706J. Is. Sd. ; granted, 38 Henry 
VIII., to Roger and Thomas Barlow. 

At PEMBROKE. A Benedictine Cell, founded in the year 
1098, by the Earl of Pembroke; yearly value I13J. 2s. 6d., 
now worth 2,262J. 10s.; granted, 37 Henry VIII., to John 
Vaughan. 

At PILLA, or PILLE. A Benedictine Priory, founded 
in the year 1200, by Adam de Rtipe ; yearly income 52/. 
2s. 5d. 9 now worth 1,0427. 8s. 4c?.; granted, 38 Henry VIII., 
to Roger and Thomas Barlow. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

AtSLEBAGii. A House of Hospitalers, founded in the 
year 1301, by Wizo and Walter his son; rents 184/. 105. 
ll^d. ; now worth 3,690/. 19s. Id. ; granted, together \utli 
several things in these parts, to Roger and Thomas Barlow. 



RADNOR (COUNTY). 

At CUM ii i RE. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1143, by Cadwathelan, though it seems that the fabric was 
finished ; the revenues, at the dissolution, made 24/. 19s. 4d. 
yearly, now worth 499/. 6s. 8rf. ; granted, 37 Henry VIII., 
to Walter Henley and John Williams. 



THE ISLE OF MAN. 

DUFFGLASS. Near this place was a Nunnery, which is 
now a dwelling house. 

At Russia. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1098, by Mac Manis, Governor of the island. This foun 
dation continued for some time after the general suppression 
of such houses in England. The Isle of Man was converted 
to Christianity by St. Patrick, about the year 447. x 



LIST 



OF 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

IN IRELAND. 



ANTRIM (COUNTY). 

At BALLYCASTLE. An Abbey, when founded is not 
known, but it seems, from an inscription on a chapel that 
had been built in the year 1612, by Randal Mac Donnell, 
Earl of Antrim, that the Abbey stood until the Reformation. 

At Bo NAM AH GY. A Monastery, founded during the 
fifteenth century by Mac Donnell ; granted to his Apostate 
descendants. 

At CARRICKFERGUS. A Franciscan Abbey, founded 
in the year 1232, by Hugh Lacy, Earl of Ulster; granted to 
Sir Arthur Chichester; is now the Mansion of the Earls of 
Donegal. 

CLUAIN. An Abbey built in the early ages by St. Olcan; 
now the Protestant place of worship. 

At GLEN ARM. A Franciscan Abbey, built in the year 
1465, by Robert Bisset, a Scotchman ; granted to Alexander 
Mac Donnell, ancestor to the Earl of Antrim. 

At GOOD BORN. A Premonstratensian Priory, founded 
about the year 1242; surrendered in the year 1542 to the 
Commissioners of Henry VIII. 

At KELLS, or DISERT. A Priory, founded in the year 
1200; surrendered, in the year 1542, to the Commissioners 
of Henry VIII. 

At KILITRAGII. A Church built by St. Patrick; now 
the Protestant place of worship. 

At LAMBEG. A Franciscan Monastery, founded by 
M* Donnell about the year 1500. " 

At LHANNAVAGH. The Church of the Dwarf, founded 
by St. Patrick ; now the Protestant place of worship. 

At MASSAREENE. A Franciscan Abbey, founded about 



LIST OF ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

the year 1500, by O Neil ; granted, in the year 1621, to 
Sir Arthur Chichester, Baron of Belfast. 

At MUCK A MORE. A Monastery, founded in the year 
.550, by St. Colman ; surrendered, after having been for 
many a^es the light of the world, the nursery of saints and 
of learning, to Henry VIII.; granted, in the year 1639, to 
the Longford family. 

At RACHLIN ISLAND. A Church, founded in the year 
546, by St. Columba This house, celebrated for learning 
and sanctity, stood in the year 1558, when the Earl of Essex, 
Lord Deputy, gained possession of the island. 

At RATIIMOANE. A Church, founded by St. Patrick, 
for his disciple St. Ereclasius; now the Protestant place of 
worship. 

RATHMUIGIIE (on the sea-shore, eight miles from Dun- 
liffsia, or Dunluce). A Monastery, founded by St. Patrick. 

At TULACII. A Church built by St. Patrick, for St. 
Nehemias, in the diocese of Connor ; now the Protestant 
place of worship. 

[Besides these, there are upwards of thirty religious 
houses on record, which were principally founded by 
St. Patrick in this county, but they are omitted because 
there is no proof that they subsisted until the Re 
formation.] 



ARMAGH (COUNTY). 

At ARMAGH. An Augustine Abbey, built in the year 
457, by St. Patrick. 

A Priory of the Culdei, or Choristers of the Cathe 
dral, had for revenues seven ballyboes, or townlands, 
worth 46Z., now worth 920 J." Sir Toby Caulfield, 
Lord Charlemount, received, in the year 1620, the 
rents for Henry VIII. 

Temple Fortagh founded by St. Patrick for St. Lu- 
pita, his eldest sister, xvho was buried here; granted, 
in the year 1618, by King James, to Francis Annesley, 
Esq. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1261> by 



LIST OF 

Archbishop Scanlon. Solomon M Conny was superior 
in 1583, when the Reformation was completed. 
CLONFEAKLE, that is, the Church of the Tooth, so 
named from a tooth of St. Patrick, which was preserved 
here ; is now the Protestant place of worship ; five miles 
from Armagh. 

At KILMORE. A Church founded by St. Mochtee; now 
the Protestant place of worship; three miles from Armagh. 
At KILSLERE. A Franciscan Monastery. Thomas 
Ornay was superior in the year 1457. 

At KILLEVY. A Nunnery, built about the year 517, 
by St. Donerca, otherwise called Monenna, sister to St. Pa 
trick, at the foot of Sliev Gullen ; now a Protestant place 
of worship. 

At STRADHAILLOYSE. A Franciscan Monastery, 
founded in the year 1282. 

[There are five religious foundations of St. Patrick 
and his disciples, omitted in this county as in the 
preceding.] 



CARLO W (COUNTY). 

At ATHADDY. An Augustine Nunnery, founded in the 
year 1151, by Dermot, son of Murchard King of Leinster. 

At BALLY M WiLLiAM-RoE, near Clonegall. A Pre- 
ceptory of Templars, founded about the year 1300. 

At KILLARGE. A Preceptory of Templars, (which was 
afterwards granted to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem,) 
founded in the reign of King John, by Gilbert de Borard ; 
granted, 1590, by Queen Elizabeth, to the wife of Gerard 
Aylmer. 

At LEIGH LIN, a town formerly of considerable note. 
The Great Abbey, founded by St. Gobban, celebrated for 
the Synod held there in the year 630. regarding the celebra 
tion of Easter. St. Laserian, Abbot in 632, had at one 
time 1500 Monks under him; he Was consecrated Bishop 
by Pope Honorius, and was Legate from the Holy See. 

LEIGHLIN BRIDGE. A Carmelite Monastery, founded 
in the reign of Henry III., by one of the Carew family ; had 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

many -endowments and privileges from Kings Henry III., 
Richard II., and Henry IV.; was finally converted, at the 
suppression, into a fort. 

At St. MULLIN S. An Abbey of Augustines, founded 
in the year 632, by St. Moling ; plundered and burnt before 
the year 1138. 

At TULLAGH. An Augustine Abbey, built in the reign 
of Edward II., on a grant of land made by Simon Lumbard 
and Hugh Tallon ; granted, 1557, by Queen Elizabeth, to 
Thomas Earl of Ormond. 



CAVAN (COUNTY). 

At BALLYLINCH. An Hospital, when founded, by whom, 
and with what endowments, is unknown ; granted by King 
James, 1605, to Sir Edward Moore, ancestor to the Earl of 
Drogheda, for three pence yearly rent. 

At CAVAN. A Dominican Monastery, founded in the 
year 1300, by Giolla O Reilly, of the dynasty of Breffiny ; 
stood until the general dissolution, but there is not now the 
least remains of it. 

At DROMLOMMAN. An Hospital, leased by King James 
to Sir Edward Moore, for 2s. 6d. yearly rent. 

At DRUMLAX, or DROMLAHAX. A Monastery, founded 
before the year 550, as some suppose, by St. Maidoc, because 
he was born in that year; granted, 13 Elizabeth, to Hugh 
O Reilly, head of the Brenie sept, for the term of 21 years, 
at the rent of 8/. 14s. 8d., now worth 17 41. 13s. 4d. 

At JCiLLACiiAD. An Abbey, founded before the year 
800, by St. Tigernach, who was buried there in the year 
805, plundered by the English in the reign of Henry II. 

At KILMORE. An Abbey, founded in the sixth century, 
by St. Columb ; now the Protestant Bishop s See. 

At LOUGH OUGHTER. An Abbey, founded in the year 
1237, by Clarus M. Moylin, Archdeacon of Elphiii ; granted, 
1570, by Queen Elizabeth, to Hugh O Reilly of the Brenie, 
head of his sept, for 21 years, at the rent of 21. 15s. Sd. 9 
now worth 55/. 13s. 4d. Perhaps he was ejected for non 
payment of rent ; for, by an inquisition taken, 27 Elizabeth, 
Y 5 



LIST OF 

he was found in arrears for 1 1 J years rent, for this and the 
Monastery of Drumlan, above said. 

At MOUNTERCONAGHT. An Endowed Hospital, granted 
by King James to Sir Edward Moore, at Is. 3d. yearly rent, 
now worth II. 5s. See Ballylinch. 



CLARE (COUNTY). 

At CLARE. An Augustine Abbey, founded in the year 
119-5, by Donald O Brien, King of Limerick; granted, 1661, 
to Henry Earl of Thomond. 

At CORCUMROE. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the 
year 1194, and largely endowed by Donald O Brien, King 
of Limerick; granted to Richard Harding. 

At EN NTS. A Monastery of Franciscans, built in the 
year 1240, by Donagh Carbrac O Brien; it is the place of 
interment of the family of the O Briens; granted, 1621, 
to William Dongan, Esq. ; is now the Protestant place 
of worship. 

At GLAN COLUMB-CHILLE. An Abbey founded by 
St. Columb ; is now a Protestant place of worship in the 
diocese of Kilfenora. 

At IKCHYCROXANE, an Island on the river Shannon. 
A Monastery, founded in the year 1 190, by Donald O Brien, 
King of Limerick; granted, 1661, to Henry Earl of 
Thomond. 

At INCHMORE, an Island in the Shannon. An Abbey, 
founded by St. Senan, who placed over it his disciple 
St. Liberius. 

At INISANLAOI. A magnificent Abbey, built in the 
year 1305, by Turlogh King of Thomond, where he is 
buried. 

At INISKELTAIR, an Island in Loughderg. An Abbey, 
founded in the year 653, by St. Camin, who is interred 
there. This Island is one of the stations for pilgrimage in 
tjie Loughderg. 

At INISNEGANAXAGH or the Island of Canons, in the 
Shannon. A priory fo Augustines, founded in the 12th 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

century, by Donald O Brien, King of Limerick; granted 
1661, to Henry Earl of Thornond. 

At INISSCATTERY, a rich and beautiful Island in the 
mouth of the Shannon. An Abbey, founded by St. Senan, 
or, as some suppose, by St. Patrick himself, who appointed 
over it St. Senan ; he had eleven churches for Friars, and 
allowed no woman to come into the island. Granted, 20 
Elizabeth, to the Mayor and Corporation of Limerick, at 
3. 12s. Sd. rent, now worth 72/. 13s. 4d. This island is a 
great resort of pilgrims, on certain festivals* 

At KILCARRAGH. A Monastery, granted to John King. 

At KILLOEN, in the Barony of Islands. A Nunnery, 
built in the year 1190, by Donald O Brien of Limerick. 
Slaney, daughter of Donogh King of Thomond, was Abbess, 
and died in 1260. She excelled all the women then in 
Munster for piety, almsdeeds, and hospitality. 

At KILSHONNY, in the Barony of Corcumroe. A mo 
nastery, granted to Robert Hickman. 

At QUIN, or QUINCI-IY, five miles east of Ennis. A 
Franciscan Monastery, built in the year 1402, by M Namara; 
the building is entirely of black marble; granted, 1583, to 
SirTirlagh O Brien of Irishdyman. The Roman Catholics 
repaired this Monastery in 1604. 

At TOMGRANY, four miles east of Loughderg. An Abbey. 
St. Manchin, Abbot, died in the year 735. It is now the 
church. 

Fifteen religious foundations of the early ages in this 
county are omitted. 



CORK (COUNTY). 

At ABBEY MAIION, near Timoleague, by Count M Sherrv- 
baj . A Cistercian Monastery, built by the Friars, and en 
dowed by Lord Barry with eighteen plowlands, that is, the 
whole parish of Abbey Mahon, which were seized by the 
crown. 

At BALLY BEG, near Buttavant. An Augustine Priory, 
founded in the year 1229, by Philip de Barry; the steeple, 



LIST OF 

At INISKIERAN, near Gape Clear. A Franciscan Mo 
nastery, founded in the year 1460, by Florence Moar 
O Driscoll ; the walls and steeple are still in good order. 

At KILBLACON, in Muscryciure. A large Monastery, 
founded in the year 650, by St. Abban; St. Beacan pre 
sided there. 

At KILCREA. A Nunnery, where St. Chera was Abbess. 

A Franciscan Monastery, founded in the year 1465, 

by Cormac McCarthy Moor, King of Desmond ; great 

part of the buildings still remains ; granted, by Oliver 

Cromwell, 1641, to Lord Broghill. 

At KIN SALE. A Priory of regular Canons, dedicated 
to St. Gobban. 

A Carmelite Friary ; when founded is not known, 
it flourished in 1350. 

At LEG AN. A Monastery, stood in the year 1301 ; at 
the suppression of religious houses, the Prior of St. John in 
Waterford was seised of this house. 

At LUEIM, near the city of Cork. A Monastery, of which 
David deCogan was patron in the year 1318. 

At MIDDLETON. An Abbey, founded in the year 1180, 
by the Fitzgeralds, or, as some think, by the Barrys; 
Gerald, Bishop of Cloyne, endowed it with several vicarages 
in 1476. 

At MONANIMY, on the Black Water, three miles below 
Mallow. A Commandery, for the support of which the 
parishes of Clenor, Carigdovvnen, Carig, and Templebodane, 
were charged in the King s books with 31. 10s. crown rent, 
now worth 701. 

AtMouRNE, or BALLYNAMONA, three miles south of 
Mallow, on the Cork road. A Preceptory, first of Templars, 
and afterwards of Hospitalers, founded in the reign of John, 
by Alexander de Sancia Helena. 

At Ross CARBERRY. An Abbey, founded in the year 
590 by St. Fachnan Mougach, or the hairy, because he 
was covered with hair at his birth ; he was Abbot of Mo- 
lona, in the county of Waterford also ; a city with a large 
seminary grown up here. 

It was also an Episcopal See. This diocese is now joined 
to the diocese of Cloyne, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At TIMOLEAGUE, in the Barony of Barryroe, eight miles 
west <of Kinsale. An Abbey of Franciscans, founded at 
Cregan, and translated hither in the year 1279, by William 
Barry, Lord of Ibaun. At the suppression, the possessions 
fell to Lord Inchiquin. The walls? arcades, and tower are 
still in good order. 

At TRACTON, two miles south of Carigline. A Cister 
cian Abbey, built in the year 1224, by M Carthy; great 
numbers of pilgrims resorted hither on Holy Thursday to 
venerate the Holy Cross ; granted, by Queen Elizabeth, 
1568, to Sir James Craig and Henry Guilford ; the former 
assigned it to the Earl of Cork. 

At WEEME, near Cork. An Augustine Priory, stpod at 
the fourteenth century, and, without doubt, until the general 
dissolution. 

At YOUGHEL, a large sea port town. A Franiscan 
Monastery, built in the year 1224, by Maurice Fitzgerald, 
Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, who died and was buried 
in 1257, after having spent many years here under the habit 
of a Monk. This house stood to the south of the town ; 
there are no traces of it now. 

A Dominican Friary, built to the north, in the year 
1268, by Maurice, descendant of Lord Offaly ; granted, 
23 Elizabeth, to William Walsh, at Is. IQd. yearly 
rent, now worth 1 /. 16s. Sd. 



DERRY (COUNTY). 

At ARRAGELL, in the Barony of Coleraine. A Monas 
tery, founded by St. Columb, to which the Protestant place 
of worship has succeeded. 

At BADONEY, in Glaun Aide, two miles from Derry. A 
Church, founded by St. Patrick. 

At COLERAINE. A Priory of regular Canons, founded, 
it is thought, by St. Carbreus, a disciple of St. Finian of 
Clonard. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1244, by 
the O Cahanes; Shane O f Boyle, the last prior, sur 
rendered it to the King s Commissioners, 1 Jan. 1542. 



LIST OF 

At KILCARTAICII. A Church in which St. Carthach 
was Bishop about the year 540 ; it is supposed to be Killcarr, 
which is a Protestant house in the diocese of Raphoe. 

At KILLYBEGS. A Franciscan Friary, built by 
M Sweeny-banning. 

At KILMA CRENAN, on the river Gannon. An Abbey, 
richly endowed by St. Coluinb ; and a Franciscan Friary, 
built by O Donnell, which is now the Protestant Church. 

At KILL O DoxxELL. A Franciscan Monastery, 
founded before the year 1600, by O Donnell; by an inqui 
sition ordered by James I., the revenues made 3s. annually, 
now worth 3 /. 

At LOUGIIDEARG, in the parish of Templecaran ; there 
are several islands, and in the largest, called St. Dabeoc, 
was an Augustin Priory, founded by St. Dabeoc, about the 
year 492. St. Patrick s purgatory, celebrated all over Eu 
rope, and visited by all nations, particularly in the fourteenth 
century, is situated in one of these islands ; the lough con 
tinues still to be the resort of great numbers of pilgrims. 

At MOVILL on Loughfoyle. A Monastery, founded by 
St. Patrick; now the Protestant place of worship. 

At RAPIIOE. A Monastery, founded by St. Columb. 

At RATHMULLIN on Loughswilly. A Carmelite Friary, 
founded by M Sweeny Fannagh. The revenues valued, 43 
Elizabeth, at 6s. 8c?., now worth 61. 13s. 4d. 

At SEINGLEAN, in the diocese of Raphoe. A Monastery, 
founded by St. Columb. 

At TOUGIIBOYNE. A Monastery, founded by St. Baithen, 
disciple and kinsman of St, Colomb, in the year 584. 

At TORRE ISLAND. A Monastery, founded before the 
year 650, in which St. Ernan was abbot. 

At TULLY, near Loughswilly. An Abbey, founded by 
St. Columb. 



DOWN (COUNTY). r V. 

At ACADHEASIL, near the Bay of Dundrum. An Abbey, 
in which St. Killen was Abbot in the fifth, and St. Senan in 
the sixth century. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At BANGOR, or the WHITE CHOIR, formerly the VALE 
OF ANGELS. An Abbey, founded in the year 555, by 
St. Corngall, of noble parentage in Ulster, and disciple of 
St. Fintan in Clonagh. This house continued until the 
Reformation a celebrated school for great men ; and an 
asylum for Kings and Princes from the busy stage of the 
world ; by an inquisition held 5 James I. the revenues were 
worth 31., now worth 60 /. 

At BLACK ABBEY, in the Great Ardes. A Benedictine 
Abbey, founded by St. John de Courcey ; granted by James I. 
to the Protestant Bishop of Armagh. 

AtBRETAix, near the town of Down. An Abbey, in 
which St. Loarne was Abbot, in the year 540 ; is now a 
Nobleman s seai, 

At CASTLE BUY, near the Lough of Strangford. A 
Comraandery, built in the year 1200, by Hugh de Lacie ; 
now in ruins. The Echlin family possess the property. 

At CUMBER, on the Lough of Strangford. An Abbey, 
founded about the year 1201, by the O Neils of Clandeboy. 
By an inquisition held, 1 James I., John O Mulligan was 
Abbot; the revenues made then 23 L 19s. 4c?., now worth 
479 1. 6s. 8cL 

At DOWNPATIUCK, a town on the Lough of Strangford. 
An Abbey, founded by St. Patrick, in which he was interred 
in the year 493. 

A Priory of Regular Canons, founded in the year 
1138, by Malachi O Morgair ; granted to Gerald Earl 
of Kildare. 

A Priory of Crossbearers, founded by Sir John de 
Courcy ; granted to the above Nobleman. 

A Cistercian Abbey, founded about the year 1200, 
by a Mr. Bagnal. 

A Cistercian Nunnery, founded there also. 
A Franciscan Friary, built in the year 1240, by Hugh 
de Lacey Earl of Ulster ; granted to Gerald Earl of 
Kildare. 

An Hospital of Lepers, granted to the same Earl. 
At DROMORE, a town originated by St. Coleman, a dis 
ciple of M Nissy Bishop of Connor. A Franciscan Priory, 
built by him about the year 513. 



LIST OF 

At DRUM BO E. An Abbey, founded by St. Patrick, in 
which St. Mochumma was Abbot in the 7th century ; now 
the Protestant place of worship. 

At DUN DRUM, in the Barony of Lecale. A Castle, built 
by Sir John de Courcey, for the Templars, in the year 1813 ; 
yearly revenues 6/. 13s. 4d., now worth 133A 6s. 8d. ; 
granted to Gerald Earl of Kildare, 

At EYNES. A Priory, founded in the year 1411, by 
Thomas Chelene ; it became the dwelling of Charles Ecklin, 
Esq. 

At GLANGRAGII, VALE OF CHARITY. An Abbey 
founded in the year 1200. 

GRAY ABBEY, on the Lough of Stranford, founded in 
the year 1192, by Africa, daughter of Godfrey King of 
Man, and wife of Sir John de Courcey; by an inquisition 
held in the first year of James I., the revenues made 2/., 
now worth 40/. ; granted to Gerald Earl of Kildare ; now 
th6 Protestant place of worship. 

At HOLLYWOOD, on the Bay of Carrickfergus. A Mo 
nastery of Franciscans; rents valued, in 5 James I., II. 
3s. 4d,, now worth 23J. 6s. Sd. 

At INISCOURCEY, in the Lough of Strangford. A Cis 
tercian Abbey, built by Sir John de Courcey, in the year 
1180; granted to Gerald Earl of Kildare. 

At KELCLIFF, on the Lough of Strangford. An Abbey, 
in which St. Eugene and St. Niell were Abbots ; now the 
Protestant place of worship. 

An Hospital for Lepers, under the patronage of 
St. Peter. 

At KILMBIAN. An Abbey built by St. Fergus, Bishop 
of Down, about the year 583. St. Neman lived here too. 

At MAGHERELIN, on the river Lagan, near Dromore. 
A Monastery, built by St. Colman, who died in the year 699 ; 
now a Protestant place of worship. 

At MOVILLE. An Abbey of Augustines, flourished from 
the year 559 until 1542, when it had been suppressed after 
having produced many illustrious saints and great literary 
characters. 

At NEWREY. A Cistercian Abbey, built by Maurice 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

M Lochlain, Monarch of all Ireland ; made into a Pro 
testant place of worship in 1543. College also destroyed. 

At NEWTOWX. A Monastery, founded in the year 1244, 
by Walter de Burgo Earl of Ulster ; surrendered 32 Henry 
VIII.; revenues worth 13/. 3s., now worth 13/. 5s. 

At SAUL, in the Barony of Lecale. An Abbey, founded 
by St. Patrick, where he died, March 17, 493, and in the 
120th year of his age, and was buried with great solemnity 
at Downpatrick ; granted to Gerald Earl of Kildare. 

At SLIEVE DONARD, a high mountain. A Monastery, 
founded by St. Domangart, a disciple of St. Patrick. 

At TOBERGLORY, a well near Downpatrick. An Abbey, 
founded by Sir John de Courcey, and richly endowed. 



DUBLIN (COUNTY). 

At BALDONGAN, in the Barony of Balruddery. A Castle 
of Templars, that was converted into a Friary and Nunnery 
alternately. 

At BALLYMADUN, in the same Barony. A Cell and a 
Church ; on the ruins of which Robert Preston, Esq. had his 
seat in the year 1542. 

At CASTLE KNOCK. An Augustine Abbey, founded by 
Richard Tirrel ; now the Protestant place of worship. 

At CLONDALKIN. An Abbey, in which St. Cronan 
Mochua was the first Abbot before the year 776 ; after hav 
ing produced many saints, it is made the Protestant place 
of worship. 

At CLONTARF. A Monastery, built in the year 550; 
now a Protestant place of worship. 

Commandery of Templars, founded in the reign of 
King John. 

At DUBLIN. Abbey of the Virgin Mary, founded, it is 
supposed, by the Danes after their conversion to Christianity, 
about the year 948. It was at first a Benedictine monastery, 
but it was granted to the Cistercians in the year 1 139. The 
house was considerably enriched by the bounty of Bishops, 



LIST OF 

Abbots, and Princes, arid always held in the greatest vene 
ration for the numerous saints and learned men it produced, 
as well as for the sacred relics which it contained. In the year 
1180, Fitz Andelm, and Miles Cogane, and Fitz Stephen, 
brought from Armagh, and bestowed upon this church a 
stone altar, and the most holy stafFof Jesus, which St. Pa 
trick used to carry in his hand ; this staff was covered with 
gold and overlaid with pearls, being held so sacred that the 
possessor of it, if a Bishop, was always deemed the canonical 
owner of the See of Armagh. The history of the staff is thus 
given by Joceline : " St. Patrick,, moved either by divine in 
stinct or angelical revelation, on his tour in the south of Eu 
rope, visited one Justus, an ascetic in the island of the Tuscan 
Sea, who was spending a solitary life of the most edifying 
sanctity. After mutual salutations and discourse on hea 
venly matters, he presented the Irish Apostle with a staff, 
which he averred he had received from the hands of 
Jesus Christ himself. In this island there were some men 
in the bloom of youth, and others who appeared aged and 
decrepid. St. Patrick, upon conversing with them, found 
that those persons seemingly old were sons of those who ap 
peared young. He was astonished at this miraculous 
appearance, until he was told that from their infancy they 
had served God ; that they were constantly employed in 
works of charity, and their doors ever open to the traveller 
and the distressed ; and that one night a stranger, with a 
staff in his hand, came to them, whom they accommodated 
to the best of their power ; and that in the morning he 
blessed them, and said, I am Jesus Christ whom you have 
always faithfully served, but last night you received me in 
my proper person. He then gave this staff to their spiritual 
father, with directions to deliver it to a stranger named 
Patrick, who would shortly visit them. On saying this, he 
ascended into heaven, and left us in that state of juvenility 
in which you behold us, and our sons, then young, are the 
old decrepid persons you now see." Joceline goes on then 
to relate, that with this staff our Apostle collected every 
venomous serpent and snake in the island of Erin to the top 
of the mountain of Crough Phadruig, or Patrick s Hill, in 
the county of Mayo, and from thence precipitated them into 
the ocean. This story was handed down by general tradition 
in that country since the earliest ages, being related by many 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

authors who flourished prior to the days of Joceline, in the 
year 1185. This house and possessions were granted, 31 Eli 
zabeth, to Edmund Fitz Alexander; rent 41. 17s. Sd., now 
worth 971. I3s.4d. 

Nunnery of St. Mary de Hogges ; founded in the 
year 1146, by Dermot son of the King of Leinster ; 
granted, 6 Edward VI., to James Sed grave ; rent 
11s. Sd., now worth III. 13s. Sd. 

Nunnery of St. Mary les Dames; without the gate. 
Abbey of St. Olave. 

Priory of All Saints, in Hoggin" Green, now called 
College Green, was founded about the year 1166, by 
Dermot, son of Murchard King of Leinster; granted, 
30 Henry VIII., to the Mayor, &c. of the city of 
Dublin, for the yearly rent of 41. 3s. 0|c?., now worth 
831. Os. IQd. 

Abbey of St. Thomas, founded by Henry II., in that 
part which is now called Thomas Court ; the possessions 
were granted to divers persons in 33 Elizabeth ; yearly 
value 241. 2s. 4d., now worth 482 L 6s. Sd. 

Priory of St. John Baptist, founded in the 12th cen 
tury, by Ailred le Palmer. In this house was an, 
infirmary, which contained fifty beds for the sick ; the 
house, site and possessions were granted to James Sed- 
grave of Dublin, for 1,078/. 15s. 8c?., now worth 
21,575/. ; and the yearly rent of 2s. 6d., now worth 
2/. 10s. 

Friary of St. Saviour, near the old bridge, on the 
north bank, founded about the year 1202, by William 
Mareschal Earl of Pembroke. The King s Inns, con 
taining courts of law, rolls, &c., are built on the site of 
this sacred edifice. 

Monastery of St. Francis, built where Francis- street 
now runs, by Ralph le Porter, in the year 1235; 
granted, 24 Henry VIII., to Thomas Stephens, at 2s. 
yearly rent, now worth 2Z. 

Monastery of the Holy Trinity, founded in the year 
1259, by the Talbot family ; granted, 34 Henry VIII., 
to Walter Terrell, at the yearly rent of 6s. le/., now 
worth 61. Is. Bd. 



LIST OF 

A Carmelite Monastery, in the parish of St. Peter, 
built in the year 1278 ; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Nicholas Stonyhurst, at the yearly rent of 2s. 6c?., 
now worth 2^/1 Os. 

Hospital of St. Stephen, founded in the year 1344. 
Steyne Hospital, built and endowed in the year 1220, 
by Henry Loundres Archbishop of Dublin. 

Allen s Hospital, founded for the poor about the year 
1500, by Walter Archbishop of Dublin. 
At FIISTGLAS, two miles from Dublin. An Abbey, 
founded, as people think, by St. Patrick. St. Kenic;is was 
Abbot and its patron Saint. Here is a well dedicated to 
St. Patrick, and remarkable for many miracles, and its sana 
tive effects ; now the house is made a Protestant place of 
worship. 

At GLASSMORE. A Nunnery, founded in the year 1190, 
by John Comin Archbishop of Dublin, in this place, which 
is three miles north of Swords; an inquisition of 33 Henry 
VIII., the revenues made yearly 112/. Is., now worth 
2,24 II. 

At HOLM PATRICK. A Priory, founded by Sitrie, son 
of Murchard on Inis Patrick. The holy Moel Finian, Prince 
of the Bregii, resigning his throne, became a Monk here, 
was afterwards Abbot, and died in the year 898 ; granted, 
20 Elizabeth, to Thomas Fitz Williams. 

At INIS-PATRICK, IRELAND S EYE, a small rocky 
island, north of Howth Hill, where St. Nessau founded, in 
the year- 570, an Abbey, in which he spent the evening of a 
holy life in praying and fasting. 

KILMAIIVHAM PRIORY, founded in the year 1174, by 
Richard Strongbow Earl of Pembroke, for the Knights Tem 
plars, but on the suppression of that order by the Pope, in 
1312, the Priory was given to the Hospitalers. By an in 
quisition taken, 32 Henry VIII., the revenues made 647. 
14s. Id. , now worth 1,294/. Is. Sd. ; granted, 20 Elizabeth, 
to William Browne, part of the revenues for 571. 10s., now 
worth 1150/. yearly. 

At KILSAGHLAX, in the Barony of Castle Knock. A 
Monastery, valued 28 Henry VIII. ; that is all we kno\v 
of it. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At LUSK. An Abbey, founded very early. 

At MOORTOWN. A Monastery, in which St. Cronan was 
the first Abbot, before the year 571. 

At PALMERSTOWX, on the Liffey, three miles from Dub 
lin. A Priory of St. Laurence. 

At SAGGARD. A Priory, founded about the year 650, 
by St. Mosacre ; now the Protestant place of worship. 

At ST. CATHERINE S. A Priory, amply endowed by 
Warrisius de Peche, for the salvation of his soul and of the 
souls of his ancestors, about the year 1220. 

At SWORDS. A Monastery, founded in the year 512, by 
St. Columb, to which he bestowed a small Missal, written by 
himself, and appointed St. Finan Lobhair, Leper, as Abbot. 
This is the church at present. 

A Nunnery, founded before the reign of King 
Edward IV. 

AtTALLAGHT, five miles from Dublin. A Monastery, 
founded early by St. Maelwan, they suppose, because he 
was the first Bishop; now a Protestant place of worship. 



FERMANAGH (COUNTY). 

At CLINISH, an Island in Lough Earn. St. Synell was 
Abbot of Clain Inis, about the year 550 ; now a Protestant 
place of worship. 

At DEROUGH. A Collegiate Church, vested in the 
crown on the general suppression. 

At DEVENISIT, an Island in Lough Earn, near Ennis- 
killen. An Abbey, built in Daimb-inis, about the year 563, 
by St. Laserian ; it stood until the general plunder. 

At GoLA,near Lough Earn. A Monastery, founded by 
M Manus, Lord of the place ; granted to Sir John Davis, 
Knight. 

At Ross ORRY, on Lough Earn. A Nunnery, founded 
about the year 480, by St. Fanchea ; now a Protestant place 
of worship, in the diocese of Clogher. 



LIST OF 



GALWAY (COUNTY). 

ABBEY GORMOGAN, nine miles east of Loughrea ; 
.granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Ulick, first Earl of Clanri- 
carde. 

At ABBEY KNOCK MOT, near Tuam. An Abbey, founded 
for the Cistercians, in the year 1 190, by Cathol O Connor 
King of Connaught,who took there the religious habit, and 
died in 1224, and is interred there; valued, 27 Elizabeth, 
yearly 209Z. 4s., now worth 4,1 ML; granted to Valentine 
*Blake, Esq. 

At AGHRIM, near Ballinasloe. An Augustine Priory, 
founded in the year 1200, by Theobald Butler ;. granted, 
with several other Houses, to Richard Earl of Clanricarde, 
for the yearly rent of 68 1. 9s. 6d. 

At AHASKERAGH, in the Barony of Kilconnell. An Ab 
bey, in which St. Cuan died in the year 788 ; now a Pro 
testant place of worship, in the diocese of Elphin. 

At ARRAX NEOMH, that is, Arran of the Saints. Many 
churches were erected in these islands, (three in number,) 
on the coast of Galway ; the bodies of many saints repose 
in them ; the King of Cashell, at the request of St. Albeus, 
granted the largest of these islands to St. Enna, who built 
ten churches in it about the year 490. 

At the MIDDLE ISLAXD. Two Churches. 

At ARDOILEN, the third of the Islands of Arran. Three 
Churches, and a Monastery, which was founded by St. 
Fechin ; the pious Abbot St. Gormgal died here in 1017. 
A Franciscan Friary was founded in these islands about the 
year 1485. 

At ATHENRY. A Dominican Friary, founded in the 
year 1241, by Meyler de Bermingham. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1464, by 
Thomas Earl of Kildare, the Earl of Desmond, and by 
OTully. 

At BALLYNOHIXCH. A Carmelite Monastery, founded 
in the year 1356, by O Flaherty. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At BEAGII. A Franciscan Monastery, founded about 
the year 1441 ; valued, in the 28 Elizabeth, 61 S/., now 
worth 61. 13s. 4d. yearly. 

At BOILEAN CLAIR, in the diocese of Tuam. A rich 
Franciscan Monastery, founded in the year 1291. 

At CLARE GALWAY. A Franciscan Monastery, built 
about the year 1290, by John de Cogan; now a Roman 
Catholic chapel is. built in its stead. 

At CLONFERT. An Abbey, founded by St. Brendan, 
about the year 553 ; he founded several other Abbeys, and 
had at one time presided over three thousand monks, each 
of whom did industriously earn a sufficiency for his own 
support ; we find that many saints lived and died here ; 
dissolved at the Reformation. 

At CLANKEEIST. A Franciscan Monastery, founded 
about the year 1435, by Thomas O Kelly, Archbishop of 
Clonfert. 

AtCLONTHUSKERT. A Monastery of Canons, founded 
about the year 809, by Boadan ; granted to Richard Earl 
of Clanricarde. 

At CLOONEYVORNAGE. An Augustine CELL, founded 
about the year 1441 ; worth, according to an inquisition 
held 28 Elizabeth, 6s. Sd., now worth 61. 13s. 4d. 

At CREVAGHBANE. A Carmelite Friary, founded in or 
about the year 1400, by the Earl of Clanricarde; granted 
to the Burgesses and Citizens of Athenry. 

At DUNDRYNAN. A Monastery, in which Thomas was 
Abbot in the year 1374. 

At DUN MORE. An Augustine Friary, built in the year 
1425, on the site of the Monastery founded by St. Patrick ; 
the Market-place and the Protestant place of worship stand 
in its stead. 

At ENAGH DUNE, in the Barony of Clare. An Abbey, 
founded in the seventh century, of which St. Meldan was 
Abbot. 

A Nunnery, founded by St. Brendan, of Clongfert, 
for his sister Briga ; granted to the Earl of Clanri 
carde. 

St. Mary s Abbey. 

z 2 



LIST OF 

A Franciscan Abbey, to which were subordinate all 
the Connaught and Ulster Monasteries ; revenues made 
yearly ol. 6s., now worth 66/. 

At FALLIG. A Monastery, founded by a Mr. Fallig, an 
Irishman, for Grey Friars, in the year 1390. The Parson 
resides there at present. 

At FIDHARD. An Abbey, founded by St. Patrick for 
St. Justus ; it is now a Protestant place of worship, in the 
diocese of Elphin. 

At GALWAY. A Franciscan Friary, founded in the 
year 1296, by Sir William de Burgh, Leigh, or Grey, in the 
island of St. Stephen, by the north gate. 

A Dominican Friary, built first for Nuns, which, 
when they forsook it, was possessed a long time by the 
secular Clergy; but finally granted, by Innocent III., 
to the Dominicans, in the year 1488. Demolished, in 
1652, by the orders of Oliver Cromwell. 

An Augustine Friary, founded on a hill near the 
town, in the year 1508, by Stephen Lynch, son to the 
Mayor of Galway. 

A Nunnery, built in the Island of Lough Corrib, 
west of the town. 

At IMMAGH. An Abbey, founded in the year 664, in 
this island, on the coast of Galway, by St. Fechin, who is 
the patron saint of the island. Now a Protestant place of 
worship. 

At INISQUIN, an island of Lough Corrib. St. Brendon 
erected an Abbey, and made St. Meldan Abbot, who died 
in the year 626. 

At KIL BOUGHT. A Monastery, built by the Waley fa 
mily ; suppressed by the orders of Queen Elizabeth. 

At KILBREXAX. A Monastery, and its appurtenances, 
granted to the Mayor, &c. of Athenry. 

At KILCORBAN. A Dominican Friar} 7 ; granted, by 
Thomas Bursjh, Bishop of Clonfert, to the Dominicans, in 
the year 1446. Pope Eugene IV. confirmed the grant. 

At KILCOLGAN. An Abbey, built in the year 580, by 
St. Colgan, the patron saint ; it is now the Protestant place 
of worship. 



ABBEYS PRIORIES, &c. 

At KILCOLGAN, in the diocese of Qonfert, founded by 
St. Columbkill. 

At KILCOXNELL. A Franciscan Monastery, founded in 
the year 1400, by William O Kelly, a nobleman, on the 
ruins of an Abbey, built in the days of St. Patrick, as it is 
supposed, by the Abbot St. Conall ; granted to Charles 
Calthorpe. 

At KILCOONAGH. An Abbey, founded by Tipraid, a 
Prince of that country, for St. Columb, who placed over it 
St. Cuonnan, maternal brother to St. Carthag. This is now 
a Protestant place of worship. 

At KILCREUNATA. A Nunnery, founded in the year 
1200, by Cathald O Connor Crovderg, for Benedictine Nuns. 
Lady Fynola, daughter of Felym O Connor, was Abbess in 
1300 ; granted to Richard Earl of Clanricarde. 

At KILLINE BON^AINA. A Franciscan Friary, built 
about the year 1428. 

At KILLOEBHAIN. A religious house of some sort. 
St. Maccectus of this house was smith to St. Patrick, and 
made the famous relic called Finnfaidheach. Now the 
Protestant place of worship. 

At KILMACBUACH. An Abbey, founded in the year 
620, by St. Colman, son of Duach ; it became an Augustin 
Monastery in 1283; here are many venerable and noble 
ruins that bespeak the former greatness and piety of the 
Irish. The round tower projects seventeen feet from its 
perpendicular line. The celebrated leaning toAver of Pisa 
in Italy projects only thirteen feet ; granted to the Earl of 
Clanricarde. 

At KiLiucjKiLL. A Nunnery, built by St. Patrick for 
his sister St. Richella ; now a Protestant place of worship, 
in the diocese of Clonfert. 

At KILTULLAGII. A Franciscan Cell, built prior to the 
year 1441. 

At KINALEKIX. A Commandery of Hospitallers, 
founded about the year 1250, by O Flaherty. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded before the year 1325. 

At LOUGHREAGH. A Carmelite Friary, founded in the 
year 1300, by Richard de Burgo, Earl of Ulster; granted 
to Richard Earl of Clanricarde. 

A Leper Hospital was there too. 



LIST OF 

At MAGIIEE, MAGHELE, or MAGHELLE. Three Mo 
nasteries, founded by St. Alban, who died in the year 650. 

At MILICK, on the Shannon. A Franciscan Friary, 
founded by O Madden, Dynast of that country. Granted 
to the Earl of Clanricarde. 

At MUCINIS. An Abbey, wherein Regulus was Abbot 
in the time of St. Columb ; this place is in Loughdearg, on 
the county Galway. 

At PALLICE. A Carmelite Friary, built in the fourteenth 
century, by Bermingham Baron of Athenry ; granted, 31 
Elizabeth, to John Rawson, at the yearly rent of 8/. 12s. Id. 
Irish, now worth 17 k 2/. 11s. 8d. 

At PORTUMISA. A Cistercian Abbey, which became in 
the course of time a Dominican Friary ; the still existing 
walls show that it had been a noble structure. The ancient 
choir is now the Protestant place of worship. 

AtRATHMATH, on Lough-Corrib. An Abbey, built by 
St. Fursey, son of Fintan, of the royal race of South Mun- 
ster, who died about the year 653, being called now Kil- 
fursa ; it is the Protestant place of worship. 

At Ross, in the diocese of Tuam. A Franciscan Friary, 
built in the year 1431. 

At ROSSERELLY. A Franciscan Monastery, founded in 
the year 1498, by Lord Gannard ; granted to the Earl of 
Clanricarde. 

.At SLEVSHANCOGII. A Franciscan Friary ; granted to 
Sir Francis Sainrnes. 

At TEMPLEGAILE, or TEAGH SASSAN. A Franciscan 
Friary, founded in the reign of Henry VII. , by the Burgo 
family; granted to the Burgesses and Commonalty of 
Athenry. Another Franciscan Friary was granted here to 
Edmond Barret. 

At TOMBEOLA, at the head of Roundslowne Bay. A 
Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1427, by O Flaher- 
ty, Dynast of that country ; demolished in the reign of Eli 
zabeth, and the stones carried away to build a castle in the 
neighbourhood. 

At TUAM. An Abbey, built in the year 487, was con 
verted in the sixth century into a Cathedral by the good St. 
Jarlath. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

A Priory of St. John the Baptist, built in the year 
1140, by Tirdelvoc O Connor, King of Ireland ; grant 
ed to Richard Earl of Clanricarde. 

A Premonstratensian Abbey, founded in the reign of 
King John, by the Burgh family ; granted, 20 Eliza 
beth, to the Burgesses and Commonalty of Athenry. 



KERRY (COUNTY). 

At AGHADOE. An Abbey, where Aodh, grandson of 
Auliff Mor. O Donoghue, King of Aoganacht Lochalein, 
was buried in the year 1231. 

At AGHAMORE. An Abbey, founded in the seventh 
century, by the Friars of St. Finbar, of Cork ; it is situated 
on a small island near the mouth of the Kenmare river. 

At ARDFERT. A sumptuous Monastery, built in the 
sixth century, by St. Brendan ; destroyed repeatedly by fire 
and wars. Thomas Lord of Kerry built, in the year 1253, 
a Monastery there, which became the burial ground of several 
illustrious families ; this house was in high estimation for 
the numerous miracles wrought there. The ruins of this 
noble edifice stand a little east of the town ; the walls of the 
steeple, choir, cloisters, dormitory, and chapel for morning 
are entire. In the church is a figure of St. Brendan in 
relievo ; the round tower, the finest in Ireland, 120 feet 
high, unfortunately fell in the year 1771. 

At BALLYNASKELIGS, or ST. MICHAEL S MOUNT, ia 
Toragha. An Augustine Abbey, removed thither from the 
Island of Great Skelig ; the ruins on the sea shore, that is 
continually wearing it away, represent the ancient Abbey as 
a noble edifice. There is a holy well consecrated to St. 
Michael, v/hich is annually visited on the 29th of Septem 
ber ; granted, 28 Elizabeth, to John Blake ; rent 6/. 135. 4rf. 
yearly, now worth 133/. 6s. Sd. 

AtCROEBHEAGH. An Abbey, founded by St. Patrick 
for his disciple St. Daluan ; St. Trian was Abbot and Bishop 
here about the year 450. 

At DINGLE. A Monastery, which was a cell to the 
Abbey of Killagh, Castlemain." 



LIST OF 

At INNISFALLEN, an island on the Lake of Killarney. 
An Abbey, founded by St. Finian Lobhar, or the Leper, 
disciple of St. Brendan, and son of the King of Munster, in 
the sixth century. In 1180 this house was held sacred as 
paradise, and the clergy were deemed so holy and trust 
worthy, that the treasures and valuable effects of the whole 
country were deposited in their hands, notwithstanding the 
Abbey was in this year destroyed by Maolduim son of Daniel 
O Donoghnue, and many of the clergy were slain, even in 
their cells, by the M,Carthys. Granted, 37 Elizabeth, 
to Robert Collan; rent 727. 3s., now worth 1443/. 

At IRRELAGH, near Loughlean. A Franciscan Friary, 
founded in the year 1440, by Thady McCarthy. Granted 
to Robert Collan at 16s. yearly rent, now worth 16/. 

At KiLLACHAD-CoNCHEAN. A Nunnery, founded in 
the sixth century, by St. Abban, for St. Conchenna. 

At KILLAGH. A Priory of Regular Canons, founded in 
the reign of John, by Geoffry de Mariscis ; granted to 
Thomas Clinton ; rent 17/. yearly, now worth 240/. 

At LISLAGHTIN. A Franciscan Monastery, founded in 
the year 1464, by O Connor, Prince of Kerry ; granted to 
Sir Edward Denny, rent3Z. 11s. ld, now worth 111. 2s. 6d. 

Mo N ASTER NE ORIEL, in the Barony of Glanerought. 

At OBORNEY. A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 
1154; was demolished 39 Elizabeth, and the possessions 
granted to the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dub 
lin. It is now a shapeless ruin. 

At RATTOO, orRATHOY, in the Barony of Clanmaurice. 
A Monastery of Regular Canons, founded in the 13th cen 
tury, in the place of a Commandery of Hospitallers; granted, 
23 Elizabeth, to John Zouche. at the rent of 6s. 7d., now- 
worth 6 1. lls. Sd. 

At SKELIG, an Island on the Coast of Iveragha. An 
Abbey, founded by St. Finian in the year 812. The Danes 
plundered and destroyed the Abbey, and kept the Monks in 
close confinement until, through hunger, they perished. 

AtTRALEE. A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

1213, by Lord John Fitz Thomas. The general burial 
place of the Earls of Desmond. 

Commandery of the Knights of St. John. 



KILDARE (COUNTY). 

At ATIIY. A Monastery of Crossed Friars, founded in 
the reign of King John, by Richard de St. Michael ; granted, 
17 Charles II. to Dame Mary Meredith. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1253, by 
the families of Boiseles and Hogans ; granted, with all 
its possessions, 35 Henry VIII., to Martin Pelles : rent 
2s. 8d. Irish, now worth 2/. 13s. 4c/. 
At CASTLE DERMOT. A Priory of Regular Canons, 
founded in the year 500, by St. Dermot, whose festival falls 
on 21st June. 

A Friary of Crouched or Crossed Friars, founded in 
the reign of King John, by Walter de Riddlesford ; 
granted, 23 Elizabeth, to Henry Harrington. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1302, by 
Thomas Lord Offaley. 

At CLANE. A Priory, founded about the year 548, by 
St. Ailbe. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded about the year 1266, 
by Gerald Fitz Maurice Lord Offaley, as people sup 
pose; granted, 24 Henry VIII., to Robert Eustace, 
John Trevor, and others, in capite, at the yearly rent 
of 2s. 4d. Irish, now worth 21. 6s. 8d. 
AtCLONAGii. A Chapel, dedicated to St. Fynan, de 
molished by John Lye of Rathbridge, according to an 
inquisition that was held 6 James I. 

At CLON CURRY. A Carmelite Friary, built in the year 
1347, by John Roche; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Wil 
liam Dickson, at &d. yearly rent ; granted, 8 Elizabeth, to 
Richard Slayne, for 21 years ; rent 16s., now worth 16Z. 

At GRANY, near CASTLEDERMOT. A Nunnery, built 
in the year 1200, by Walter de Riddlesford ; richly en 
dowed by the benefactions of several ladies and noblemen ; 
granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Sir Anthony St. Leger. 

z 5 



LIST OF 

At GREAT COXALL. A Priory, founded in the year 
1202, by Mayler Fitz Henry, grandson of Henry I. It be 
came the cradle and tomb of great and learned men. 
Granted, 3 Elizabeth, for sixty-one years, to Sir Nicholas 
White ; rent 26Z. 19s. 5d., now worth 539L 8s. Adi 

At KILBEGS. A Commandery of Hospitallers. 

At KILCOCK. A Monastery, dedicated to the Virgin 
St. Cocho. 

At KILCULLEK. A Monastery, founded by St. Patrick, 
who appointed St. Isernin superior. He was succeeded by 
St. Mactalius, who died of the plague in the year 548. 

At KILDARE. A Nunnery and Monastery, founded in 
the year 453, by St. Brigid, the first Nun in Ireland. The 
houses and revenues granted by Elizabeth to Antony Deer- 
inge; rent 31. 10s. Sd. Irish, now worth 70/. 13s. 4e?. 

A Franciscan Abbey, built in the year 1260, by 
Lord William de Vcsey ; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Daniel Sutton ; rent 2s. 3d. Irish, now worth 2/. 5s. 

A Carmelite Friary, built in the year 1290, by Wil 
liam de Vesey. 

At KILHILL. A Commandery of Hospitalers, built in 
the 13th century, by Maurice Fitzgerald; granted to John 
Allen. 

At KILLOSSEY, near KILDARE. An Abbey, founded 
by St. Patrick for his nephew St. Auxil, who died 27 Au 
gust 454 ; hence the place was called Kil-usaille, and after 
wards Kill-ussi. It is now the Protestant place of worship. 

At KILRUSHE. An Augustine Abbey, founded in the 
1 3th century by William Mareschal Earl of Pembroke ; 
granted to the Earl of Ormond. 

At LEI XL IP. A Monastery stood in the year 1463 near 
this village. 

At MAYNOOTH. A College, founded about the year 
1518, by Gerald Earl of Kildare, for a Provost, Vice Pro 
vost, five Priests, two Clerks and three boys, to pray for his 
own soul and for the soul of his wife. 

At MONASTEREVAN. A sumptuous Abbey, built by 
St. Alban, in the 7th century. St. Emin, or Evin, of the 
Eogonacht s family in South Munster, brought a number of 
Monks from thence to this house ; his festival is held on 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

22d December. At the suppression it fell into the hands of 
the Earl of Drogheda, and is now the mansion of that 
family, under the name of Moore Abbey. 

At MOONE. Alarge old Church, of which the cross, and 
several Irish inscriptions, still remain. 

At NAAS. An Augustine Priory, founded in the year 1200, 
by the Baron of the town ; granted, 1553, to Richard 
Mannering, at the rent of 351. 18s. 2d, now worth 71S, 
3s. 4d. 

A Dominican Friary, founded about the year 1355, 
by the Eustace family; granted, 34 Henry VIII., to 
Sir Thomas Luttrell, at 9s. 4d. rent, now worth 
91. 6s. Sd. 

An Augustine Friary, founded in the year 1484. 
The possessions were valued, in the reign of Elizabeth, 
at 61. 12s. Sd., now worth 132/. 13s. 4d. ; granted to 
Nicholas Aylmer. 

At NEW ABBEY. A Franciscan Monastery, founded in 
the year 1460. by Sir Rowland Eustace, Lord Treasurer of 
Ireland; granted, 1582, to Edmond Spenser ; yearly rent 
31. Irish, now worth 60/. 

At ST. WOLSTANS. A Priory, built in the year 1202, 
by Adam de Hereford, in honour of St. Wolstan Bishop of 
Worcester, lately canonized ; granted, 28 Henry VIII., to 
Allen of Norfolk, at the rent of two knights fees. 

At TIMOLIN. A Priory of Regular Canons, founded here 
very early; stood in the year 927, and, of course, continued 
until the general suppression. 

A Nunnery, founded in the reign of John, by Robert 
son of Lord Noragh, in which his granddaughter Lece- 
lina was Nun. This house was richly endowed b^y the 
bounty of several Catholic Bishops. Granted, 23 Eliza 
beth, to Henry Harrington and his heirs, at the yearly 
rent of 2H. 19s. Irish money, now worth 439/. 

At TULLY, near Kildare. A Commandery of Hospital 
ers, founded before the year 1308. This Commandery, 
with all its possessions, were granted to Sir Henry Harring 
ton, at the rent of 21 /. 6s. Sd., now worth 4261. 13s. 4d. 
It is now held in commendam with the Protestant See of 
Kildare. 



LIST OF 



KILKENNY (COUNTY). 

At CALL AN. An Augustine Friary, founded, as some 
persons say, by Hugh de Mapilton, Bishop of Ossory, ia 
the year 1251 ; or, as others think, by the Ormonds; 
granted, together with the Abbey of Athassel, to Thomas 
Earl of Ormond, in the year 1557. 

Chantry, of which the nave and aisles are still in 
good preservation ; the choir being the Protestant 
place of worship. 

AtFERTOGH. A Priory, dedicated to St. Kieran, by 
the Blanchfield family, in the thirteenth century; granted, 
9 Elizabeth, to James Butler, Jun. ; rent, I M. 13s. 3d., now 
worth 253/. 5s. 

At FIDDOWN. An Abbey, by St. Maidoc, in the year 
590. Now a Protestant parochial place of worship. 

At FRESH FORD. An Abbey, founded by St. Lactan r 
Bishop and Abbot ; he died in the year 622. There is a 
celebrated fountain near Cashell dedicated to him. This 
is now a Protestant place of worship, and called a Prebend 
of Aghour. 

At GRAIGNEMANAGH. A Monastery, founded in the 
year 1212, by William Mareschal Earl of Pembroke ; 
this was enriched by the bounty of several Bishops and 
Nobles. The house with all its possessions, were granted, 
8 Elizabeth to the Butlers. 

At JERPOINT, near THOMASTOWN. A Cistercian 
Abbey, founded by Donogh O Donoghue, (in the year 
1 180,) King of Ossory ; and richly endowed by him. The 
house with all the possessions were granted to James Earl of 
Ormond, at the annual rent of 49 1. 3s. 9d. ; now worth 
983J. 15s. 

At INISTIOGE on the NOIRE. An Augustine Priory, 
built in the year 1210, by Thomas Seneschal, of Leinster ; 
granted, with all the possessions, to James Butler and his 
heirs at the rent of 28/. 12s.; now worth 572. A rectory 
granted in Whitchurch to the Earl of Ormond, 31 Eliza 
beth. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At KELLS. An Augustine Priory, founded in the year 
1193, by Geoffry, for the salvation of Earl Richard, Go 
vernor of the country, Granted, by Henry VIIJ., to James 
Earl of Ormond. 

At KILLAGHY. An Abbey, in which St. Sinchell was 
Abbot, and died of the plague, 26th of March 548, in the 
130th year of his age ; he was interred in this place. 

At KILLAMARY, five miles south of Callan. St. 
Gobban presided here over a thousand monks ; the place is 
now a Protestant place of worship. 

At KILCLEHEEN, opposite the City of Waterford. A 
Nunnery, built in the year 1 15 1 , by Dermot son of Murchad, 
King of Leinster. It was sumptuously endowed by himself 
and other Noblemen. Catherine Motyng, the last Abbess, 
surrendered the Abbey, 2d April, 31 Henry VIII. ; granted, 
26 Elizabeth, to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Corporation 
of Waterford ; rent, yearly, 59 1. Is. Sd. ; now worth 
118U 13*. 4d. 

At KILFANE. An Abbey, erected by St. Phian; it is 
now a Protestant place of worship, seven miles from Kil 
kenny. 

At KILKENNY, a large handsome town on the river 
Noire, and capital of the County ; it can justly boast of 
three singular properties fire without smoke, water without 
mud, and streets paved with marble. 

The Cathedral of St. Kenny, though long since made 
the Protestant place of worship, still retains the ancient 
Catholic Cross, and many statues of Saints and Catho 
lic Bishops, with several other reliques of Catholicity. 

St. John s Abbey, founded in the year 1211, for the 
relief of the indigent poor, by William Mareschal Earl 
of Pembroke ; and richly endowed by him with several 
lands. Richard Cantwell, the last Prior, surrendered 
this house with all the possessions, 31 Henry VIII.; 
granted to the mayor and citizens of Kilkenny, with 
100 acres of land, 40 gardens, a water-mill in Mag 
dalen-street, a wood called Channonsgrove in the li 
berties of the town, with 200 acres of land adjoining, 
ten messuages and 200 acres in Drakeland, in the 
county, and another messuage in the town. 



LIST OF 

The Black Abbey, in the Irishtown. A Dominican 
.;.-. Priory, founded in the year 1225, by William Mares- 
chal, jun., Earl of Pembroke ; he was interred in the 
choir in the year 1231. The house was endowed by 
King Henry VI., and the Bishops of Ossory. Peter 
Cantwell, the last Prior, surrendered it; and, 35 
Henry VIII., it was granted to Walter Archer, the 
sovereign, and to the burgesses of Kilkenny for ever, 
at the yearly rent of 12s. 4d. Irish money; now worth 
12/. 6s. Sd. 

A Franciscan Priory, founded on the bank, of the 
Noire, by Richard Mareschal Earl of Pembroke, 15th 
October 1244. King Henry III. granted 201. to be 
paid annually for buying Albs for the Franciscans of 
Kilkenny, Dublin, Cork, Waterford, and Athlone. 
17th Nov. 1338, a great flood destroyed all the bridges, 
mills, and buildings in and about Kilkenny, but did 
not approach the great altar of this Monastery. The 
noble and venerable rains of this edifice stand yet, 
reaching from the city wall to the river. Yearly value 
of the possessions was then 91. 7s. Id. ; or in money of 
the present day, 187/. Is. 8d. 

At KILMANAGH. An Abbey, founded in the year 563, 
by St. Natalis. 

At KNOCKTOPHER. A Carmelite Friary, founded in 
the year 1356, by James the second Earl of Ormond ; 
granted, with all the appurtenances, to Patrick Barn wall, 
34 Henry VIII., for ever, at the yearly rent of 4s. Irish ; 
now worth 4/. 

At ROSSIBEHCAN. A Monastery, founded 1267. by the 
Walsh family ; granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Luke Blake, of 
New Ross, County Wexford. i 

At THOMASTOWN. A Dominican Friary. 
At TIBRACH, on the Suir below Carrick. An Abbey, 
where St. Dominic lived in the sixth century ; now a Pro 
testant place of worship. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



THE KING S (COUNTY). 

At BIRR, now PARSONSTOWN, a beautiful town, fifty- 
seven miles west of Dublin. An Abbey, founded by St. 
Brendan, son of Neim. 

At CLONEMORE. An Abbey, founded by St. Pulche- 
rius. 

At CLO> T EFERTMULLOE. An Abbey, founded in the 
sixth century, by St. Molua, or St. Luan, the son of Carthar, 
of Munster. Clonefertmulloe is now a Protestant place of 
worship. [Clone, with which these names are compounded, 
is an Irish word, and signifies enclosure ; andferta, another 
Irish word, signifying miracles, so that this name signifies 
the miracle-retreat of St. Mulloa.] 

At CLONMACNOISE, on the Shannon, in the Barony of 
Garycastle. St. Kieran having received this place, and the 
Island of Saints, together with one hundred Churches in 
Meath, from Dermid, son of Cervail, monarch of Ireland, 
and having bestowed the Church of Clonard upon his 
master, St. Finian, and the island upon St. Domnan, he 
founded, in the year 548, an Abbey for himself at Clon- 
macnoise, which became a celebrated Monastery. Besides, 
there was a Cathedral Church, ten small churches built by 
different provincial Kings, and a Nunnery with a Church, 
which was accidentally burnt in 1180, and rebuilt by the 
Queen of Meath. 

At DURROW. A Monastery of Augustine Canons, 
founded in the sixth century, which flourished in learning 
and sanctity for many ages, until it was granted, 4 Eliza 
beth, to Nicholas Herbert, Esq., for the term of twenty-one 
years, at \Ql. yearly rent; now worth 200^. 

At FRANKFORT, formerly called KILCORMUCK on the 
Shannon. A Monastery of Carmelites, founded by Odo 
O Molloy, a chief of that country. In the year 1479, died 
Charles O Molloy, a brave and holy man. This house with 
all the possessions were granted to Robert Leicester. 

At GALLEX. A Monastery, founded in the year 492, by 
St. Canoe ; granted, with all the possessions, 4th June 1612 



LIST OF 

to Sir George Moore, at the yearly rent of 151. Is. lid. * 
now worth 307/. 18s. 4cZ. 

At GLEAN, or GLIN,OII the river Brusna, near Firbance. 
A Monastery, founded by St. Dermid, whose feast is held 
on the 8th of July ; it stood till the eleventh century, and, 
of course, until the general dissolution. 

At KILCOLGAN. An Abbey, founded in the year 580, 
by St. Colgan, in the Barony of Garycastle. 

At KILCOLGAN. An Abbey, founded in the year 570, 
near the parish of Birr, by St. Colgan, son of Aengus, 
King of Munster ; now a-Protestant place of worship. 

At KILCOMIN, near Roscrea. An Abbey, founded or 
governed by St. Cumene, surnamed the White, who was 
educated in the Abbey of Hy. 

At KILLEGALLY. An Abbey, in which St. Trena was 
Abbot in the sixth century ; now a Protestant place of 
worship in the Barony of Garycastle. 

At KIL LEIGH. A Priory of regular Canons, in which 
the Abbot St. Sincheal died of the plague in the year 550. 
This house, 18 Elizabeth, with three messuages, 124 acres 
of arable land, 24 of pasture, 3 of meadow, arid 4 of wood, 
and three messuages, six cottages, 24 acres of arable land, 
and 7 of pasture, in the town of Donfeigh in this county, 
with the tithes, &c., were granted to Gerald, Earl of Kil- 
dare, and his heirs, at the yearly rent of II. 13s. 4c?., now 
worth 33/. 6s. 8d., with the condition that he maintain 
besides one able horseman. 

A Nunnery, founded by the Warren family soon after 
the arrival of the English. A Dominican Friary, built 
in the reign of Edward I., by O Connor; granted to 
John Allee. 

At KILLIADHUIN.A Nunnery, founded in the 5th cen 
tury, by St. Keran, for his mother Liadana. 

AtKiNNiTTY, near Birr. An Abbey, founded in the 
year 557, where St. Finan was Abbot that year. In the 
year 871, died Abbot Colga M Conagan, who was esteemed 
the best and most polished poet of those days in the kingdom, 
and the principal historian. 

At LEMANAGHAN. A Monastery, in which St. Mau- 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

chan died of the plague in the year 661 ; became after 
wards a Protestant place of worship. 

At LEITIIMORE. A Monastery, founded in the year 
655, by St. Pulcherius, in the Irish language Mochoemoc. 
Many Saints and holy Abbots flourished here until the dis 
solution. 

At LYNN ALLY. A Monastery, founded 516, by St. 
Colman. 

At MONISTERORAS. A^Franciscan Friary, built 1325, 
by Sir John of Bermingham, Earl of Louth ; granted to 
Nicholas Herbert. 

At MUGNA. An Abbey, founded by St. Finan, of Clo- 
nard, on a piece of land which was given him by the King 
of Leinster, Carbreus. 

At RATH BEG. An Abbey, founded south of Birr, by 
St. Abban, who died in the year 650. 

At RATHLIBTIIEN, in the Barony of Fercall. An Abbey, 
founded by St. Illand about 540; his statue is still to be 
seen in the church, with his mitre and crosier in his hand. 

At RAYNAGH. A Nunnery, founded by St. Regnacia, 
sister to St. Finian, who died in the year 563 ; his mother, 
Tolacia, was Abbess here : now a Protestant place of wor- 7 
ship. 

At SEIRKERAN, four miles east of Birr. A Monastery, 
founded 402, by St Kieran, native of Cape Clear, in the 
county Cork. It was consigned, with all the possessions, in 
the year 1568, to Sir William Taafe, who assigned it to 
James Earl of Roscommon. 

AtTuiLEiM. A Monastery, in which Abbot Carnech 
died in the year 556. 



LEITRIM (COUNTY). 

At ANAGHDUFFE, nearLoughboffin. An Abbey, founded 
in the year 766 ; now a Protestant place of worship in the 
diocese of Ardagh. 

At BALLEGARCY. A beautiful Monastery, founded in 
the year 1518, by Cornelius O Brien; some writers attach 
this place to the county of Longford. 



LIST OF 

At CLONE. An Abbey, formerly of great repute, founded 
about the year 570, by St. Fraecli ; now a Protestant 
place of worship in the diocese of Ardagh. 

At CREEVLEA, on the river BoonicL A Franciscan 
Friary, founded in the year 1508, by Margaret, daughter 
of Lord O Brien, and wife to Lord O Roirk; she died in 
1512, and was interred here; dissolved in the reign of 
James I. 

At DOIREMELLE, in Lower iBrerfiny. A Nunnery, found 
ed by St. Tigenach for his mother St. Mella, who died be 
fore the year 787. 

At DROMLEAS, on Loughgille. A Monastery, built by 
St. Patrick for St. Benignus ; now a Protestant place of 
worship. 

At DROMAHAIRE. See CREEVLEA. 

At FENAUGII, in the Barony of Leitrim. A Monastery, 
in which St. Callin was Abbot in the time of St. Columb. 
This place was formerly celebrated for the School of Divinity, 
and was the general resort of students from all parts of 
Europe ; half a mile from the edifice is a well dedicated to 
St. Callin ; now a Protestant place of worship in the diocese 
of Ardagh. 

At JAMESTOWN. A Franciscan Friary. 

At KILDAREIS, or Cell of the Two Palms of the Hands; 
called also Carcuir. Shineill, or the Reclusory of St. Shi- 
nell, is situated in Lough Melvin. St. Shinell, who was bell* 
founder to St. Patrick, died in the year 548. 

At KILNAILE. St. Natalis, or Naal, was Abbot of the 
Abbey here, and died in the year 563 ; the festival is on 
the 27th of January. 

At LEITRIM, on the Shannon. An Abbey, in which St, 
M Xeigus was Abbot. 

At Mo HILL. An Abbey, founded in the year 608, by 
St. Manchan, who was the patron of seven churches. Many 
glebes, fees, lands, and tithes, were given to this house ; 
they were valued at the dissolution at 2/. 6s. Sd. , now worth 
461. 13s. 4^. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



LIMERICK (COUNTY). 

At ABBINGTON. A Monastery, founded for the Cister- 
tian Monks in the year 1205, by Theobald Fitzwalter Lord 
of Carrick, who richly endowed it, and was interred here 
in the year 106. December 6, 5 Elizabeth, this Monas 
tery was granted, with its appurtenances in the counties of 
Limerick, Kerry, and Carlow, to Peter Walshe, at the 
yearly rent of 577. 2s. 3d., Irish money, now worth 11 42 /.5s.; 
he was to maintain one horseman on the premises besides. 

At ABBEYFEAL. A Cistertian Abbey, built in the year 
1188. 

At ADAIRE, formerly a respectable place, though now 
but a miserable village. A Friary of the Order of the Holy 
Trinity, founded in the reign of Edward I., by John Earl 
of Kildare ; granted, 37 Elizabeth, with all the possessions, 
together with the possessions of the Grey Friars, Preaching 
Friars, and Augustinian Friars, the Abbey of Monasterne- 
nagh, and the "Nunnery of St. Katherine, to Sir Henry 
Wallop, at the. rent of 26/. 17s. 8dL, now worth 5371. 13s. 4d., 
he being bound to maintain two horsemen on the premises. 
Augustine Friary, founded about 1315, by John Earl 
of Kildare ; granted to Sir Thomas Wallop, together 
with the possessions. Of this friary remain, still in good 
preservation, the steeple, which is supported on an 
arch, the choir, nave, and aisle ; there are some beauti 
ful cloisters with Gothic windows, the sides of which 
are ornamented with escutcheons and saltire crosses 
alternately : the workmanship is both simple and ele 
gant. 

Grey Friary, founded in the east part of the town, 
in the year 1465, by Thomas Earl of Kildare, and 
Joan his wife, daughter to the Earl of Desmond ; they 
presented unto the house two silver chalices and a bell 
that cost 10/., now worth 200/. The Countess was 
interred in the choir in the year 1486. 

The Friary, with its possessions, sixteen acres of 
land, a church, three parks, a water-mill and water 
course, with a fishing wier on the river Mage, was 
granted, 37 Elizabeth, to Sir Henry Wallop, Knt. 



LIST OF 

At ANY, in the Barony of Small County. Augustin 
Friary, built in the reign of Henry II. by sundry persons ; 
granted, 31 Elizabeth, to Edward, John, and Mary Absley, 
at the yearly rent of 47 1. 7s. 6|c?., now worth 94:71. 10s. lOd, 

At CLUNCAGH, near Rathkeale. A Convent, built by 
St. Maidoc, of Ferns, who died in the year 624; now a 
Protestant place of worship. 

At CROAGH, near Rathkeale, formerly a large town. 
There is a large church, which was anciently collegiate. 

At GALE ALLY, in the Barony of Cashlea. A large Monas 
tery, founded by the O Briens : the ruins thereof, which are 
yet visible, together with the ruins of several other religious 
foundations, clearly evince the ancient magnificence of this 
town. This Monastery, with three gardens, six messuages, 
and six acres of arable land, were granted, 35 Henry VIII. , 
to John Desmond for ever, at the yearly rent of 4of. Irish, 
now worth 6s. Sd. 

At GREANY, formerly a town of Corporation in the Ba 
rony of Coanagh. A Collegiate Church, destroyed when 
the town fell into insignificance and obscurity. 

This town took its name from a celebrated Hospital of 
Hospitalers, which was founded in the reign of King John, 
by Geoffrey de Mariscis, chief Governor of Ireland in the 
year 1215. Queen Elizabeth granted this hospital and all 
the possessions to Sir Valentine Brown, ancestor of the 
noble family of Kenmare in Killarney : he built a magnifi 
cent castle on the venerable ruins. 

At KILDIMMA, near Adaire. A Monastery, built by 
Dimma, a Priest, who was the preceptor of St. Declan. 
See KILMAMHAMBEG, page 85, hujus. 

At KILMALLOCK, formerly a respectable walled town, 
but now a miserable Priory of regular Canons, founded by 
St. Mocheallog, who died about 639 j now the Protestant 
place of worship. 

Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1291, by 
Gilbert, son of Lord Offalley ; granted 36 Elizabeth, 
with the possessions, to Nicholas Maigh, sovereign, and 
the Corporation, for ever, at the yearly rent of 2/. 13s.Sc?., 
now worth 531. 13s. 4d. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

AtKiLSiiAXE, orKiLSHONNA, near the county of Cork. 
A Franciscan Monastery, founded by Fitzgerald Lord of 
Clenlis. 

A Cistercian Abbey, founded in the year 1198. 
At KILTEEL. A Hospitaler s Commandery, founded in 
the Barony of Counagh. 

At KILTEIDHILL, in the Territory of A ra. An Abbey 
which was the place of interment of the Saints Mumis and 
LomchuOj disciples of St. Patrick, and of seven other holy 
Bishops. 

KYNNETHIN. An Abbey stood there in the year 1300, 
and we may presume that it stood until the general devas 
tation. 

At LIMERICK, as celebrated for its brave defence against 
King William in the year 1691, as for the infamous trea 
chery on his part in violating the articles of capitulation. A 
Nunnery, founded in the year 1374, by Donald O Brien, 
King of Limerick. 

A Priory of Regular Canons, founded by Simon 
Minor, before the year 1319 ; granted, at the suppres 
sion, to Edmond Sexton. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1250, by 
Donogh C. O Brien King of Thomond. In the year 
1462 died James son of the Earl of Desmond ; the 
ancient records of this house represent them bound to 
celebrate annual masses for the soul of this nobleman, 
and for the souls of his parents and successors, with 
their wives. 

Henry, the last Prior, was found at the suppression 
to be seised of the site, church, steeple, dormitory, three 
chambers, a cemetery, and sundry closes, containing 
one and a half acre, within the precincts ; a garden of 
four acres without the walls of the monastery, and 
thirty acres of land, called Cortbrecke, in the liberties ; 
salmon weir, St. Thomas s Island, and land near Par- 
teen, called Monabrahir. This house, with all the 
possessions, were granted, 35 Henry VIII. , to James 
Earl of Desmond, in capite, at the yearly rent of 5s. 2cf., 
now worth 51. 3s. 4d. A part of the Friary is converted 
; nto a tan-yard, and a large barrack is built on the 
other part. 



LIST OF 

A Grey Friary, founded in the time of Henry III., 
by O Brien, of the royal houses of Limerick and 
Thomond, outside the walls of the city, on the spot 
where a court-house was built, which is since con 
verted into an hospital ; granted to Edmond Sexton, 
by King Henry VIII. , at the yearly rent of 2s. 2c?., 
now worth 2/. 3s. 4d. ; though by a valuation then 
made, it was worth a great deal more. 

An Augustine Friary, founded in the 13th century, 
by O Brien, of the kingly race of Limerick and Tho 
mond, near Quay-lane, but not a trace of it is to be 
seen now. The possessions of this house in lands and 
houses, through town and country, were valued at 
SI. 6s. Id., now worth 1661. Is. 8d. 

An Hospital of Templars stood near the above house, 
but not a vestige of this either is to be seen. 

AtMiLTOWN, or BALLYMULLIN. A Carmelites Friary, 
founded by Nellan O Mulloy. 

AtMoNASTEiiNENAGH,in the Barony of Poble O Brien. 
A Cistercian Abbey, founded by O Brien, in the year 1151. 
This house, with all the possessions, consisting of rive plough 
lands, and many other revenues and privileges, were granted 
to Sir Henry Wallop. 

At MONASTERXACALLIAGII, near Lough-Girr. An 
Augustine Nunnery, to which belonged the rectories of 
Drishane, Cullen, Nohavel, Kilmeen, and Dromtariff, in 
the county of Cork ; granted to Sir Henry Wallop. 

At M UNO RET, three miles south of Limerick. A Mo 
nastery, built prior to the coming of St. Patrick to Munster; 
he placed St. Nessan over it, who died in the year 551. 
The Psalter of Cashel relates that there were, within the 
walls of this Abbey, six churches, that contained 1500 
religious ; 500 of whom were learned preachers, 500 psalm 
ists, and the remaining 500 engaged in spiritual exercises. 
The ruins are still visible. 

At NEWCASTLE. Hospital of Templars founded here, and 
then a walled town, which, since the destruction of this 
hospital or castle, fell into its present insignificance. 

At RATHKEALE. A Priory of Augustinians, built by a 
Mr. Harvey. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 



LONGFORD (COUNTY). 

ABBEY SHRULE, near the river Inny, founded by 
O Farrell, for Cistercian Monks; granted, 11 Elizabeth, to 
Robert Dillon, with the appurtenances, twenty-four cottages, 
in the t.own of Vore; one hundred and eighty acres of 
land near it ; eighty acres of pasture and underwood, near 
said town also ; one messuage, four cottages in Cranaghe ; 
sixty acres near said town ;, two messuages and four cottages 
in Ballynamanoghe ; sixty-four acres near the same, for the 
yearly rent of 10/. 14s. 4d, now worth 2141. 6s. Sd. 

At ARDAGH, near Longford. A Monastery, founded by 
St. Patrick. 

At BALLYNASAGGART. A Franciscan Friary, built by 
the O Farrells. 

At CLONEBRONE, near Granard. A Nunnery, founded 
by St. Patrick, for the two Emerias of St. Guasact, Abbot 
of Lerha. This great asylum of virgins stood until the year 
1107, and, of course, until the general dissolution of Abbeys. 

At DEIRG, or ABBEY DEIRG. A Priory, founded in the 
time of Joan, by Gormgall O Quin; value at the suppres 
sion 2/. yearly, now worth 40/.; granted to Nicholas Aylmor. 

At INCHYMORY, or GREAT ISLAND. A Monastery, 
founded by St. Columb, about the year 450, where St. 
Boadan, of Inismore, died, on the 1 4th January. In the 
vear 1414 died Edward M Findbair, Prior. 

At INISBOFFIN, an Island in Lough Rie. An Abbey, 
founded by St. Risch, son of St. Dorerca, sister of St. 
Patrick. 

At INISCLOTIIRANN, an Island in the same Lough. An 
Abbey, founded in the year 540, by St. Dhearmuid Naoimb 
or St. Jerome the Just, and brother to Felix bishop of 
Kilniore, who wrote a learned and pious work, in the nature 
of a Psalter. On the 17th December 1160, died Gilla or 
Nehemias O Dunin, professor and celebrated scholar, poet 
and historian. 

At ISLAND OF ALL SAINTS, in Lough Rie. A noble 
Monastery, built in the year 544, by St. Kieran. In four 



LIST OF 

years afterwards he procured a very large endowment for 
the support of its poor and having appointed St. Dom- 
nan his successor, he quitted this island, and built the Abbey 
of Clonmacnoise. 

At KILGLASS. A Nunnery, where St. Echea, sister of 
Mell, was abbess. 

At KILINMORE. An Abbey, founded by St. Palladius, 
who lived in the year 450 ; now the Protestant place of 
worship. 

At LERIIA, near Granard. A Monastery, founded by 
St. Patrick, for St. Guasacht, the son of his old master; 
another Monastery, founded in the year 1205, by Lord 
Richard Tuit, who was killed in Athlone, in the year 1211, 
by the falling of a tower, and was buried here. The pos 
sessions, at the surrender, valued at SI. 13s. 4d. yearly, now 
worth 173/. 6s. Sd. 

At LONGFORD. An Abbey, founded by St. Idus, a dis 
ciple of St. Patrick, whose feast falls on the 14th July. In 
1400 a fine Monastery was founded by O Farrell, for the 
Dominicans ; granted, together with possessions, in the year 
1615, by King James I., to Francis Viscount Valentia. The 
church of this Priory is now the Protestant place of worship 
in the parish. 

At MOYDOE, three miles from Ardagh. St. Modan, whose 
feast falls on the 12th February, was Abbot in 591. 

At ST. JOHNSTOWN. There was a Grey Friary near 
this town, which had, of course, been ingulfed in the ge 
neral vortex of the Reformation. , 



LOUTH (COUNTY). 

At ARDEE. A Crouched Friary, founded by Roger Lord 
Ardee, for the salvation of his own soul, and the souls of his 
wife Alicia, his father William, his mother Joan, his 
brethren Gilbert and Peter, in the year 1207, for the Augus- 
tinians. The founder, for the better support of this house, 
and to enable the Friars to exercise more liberally their 
works of mercy and charity, granted them the carucate of 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

land which Osmond Doubleday held ; also full liberty to 
bring water for the use of the house, and a sufficient cart- 
way. ^ This^ house was considerably endowed, by grants and 
donations, from several other pious Catholics. In the year 
1612 James I. granted the house and possessions to Sir 
Garret Moore, at the yearly rent of 115/. 5s. Sd., now 
worth 2,3051. 13s. 4d. 

A Carmelite Friary, founded in the time of Richard I. 
In the year 31 Henry VIII. Patrick, the last Prior, 
surrendered this house and all the possessions, valued 
yearly at II. 7s. 2c?., now worth 271. 3s. 4d. 

ARDPATRICK. Church founded by St. Patrick. 

At CARLINGFORD. A Dominican Friary, founded in 
the year 1305, by Richard de Burgh Earl of Ulster; 
granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Nicholas Bognell, at the yearly 
rent of 41. 6s. 8d., now worth 86/. 13s. 4d. 

At DROGHEDA. A Priory of regular Canons, celebrated 
for the Synod held there by Cardinal Papiro, in the year 
1152. 

St. Mary s Hospital, founded by Ursus de Swemele, 
who by the consent of his wife Christiana, bestowed on 
this house all his lands and rents in Ireland. The 
house was seized, 31 Henry VIII., of 60 acres of land 
in Glaspistell, rent 13s. 4d. ; 30 acres in Carlingford, 
rent 13s. 4c?.; two messuages in Dundalk, rent 6s.; 
two ; acres in Stabanane, rent 2s. ; besides some other 
rectories, lands, &c. Granted to the Mayor of Drog- 
heda; rent I/. 14s. 4d., now worth 341. 13s. 4d. 

St. Laurence s Priory ; granted to the Mayor of 
Drogheda. 

A Dominican Priory, founded in the year 1224, by 
Lucas, Archbishop of Armagh. Granted, 35 Henry 
VIII., with all the possessions, to Walter Dowdel and 
Edward Becke, at the rent of 2s. 2d., now worth 
21. 3s. 4d. 

A Franciscan Friary, in which some murderers took 
shelter, and abjured the land, in the year 1300; grant 
ed, 34 Henry VIII, to Gerald Aylmer; rent 3s. 6d., 
now worth 3/. 10s. 

2 A 



LIST OF 

An Augustine Friary, founded in the time of 
Richard I. ; granted to the Mayor, &c. of the town. 

A House of St. Bennet ; the parliament held at 
Drogheda, in the year 1467, under John Earl of Wor 
cester, the Lord Deputy, it was decreed that several 
lands and rents would be granted to this house. 

At DROMCARR. An Abbey, in which Ceallagh, Abbot, 
died in the year 811 ; now a Protestant place of worship, 
in the diocese of Armagh. 

At DRUIMFI^IAST. An Abbey, where St, Finian was 
Abbot and Bishop, in the time of St. Columb. 

At DRUMSHALLON. A noble Monastery, founded by 
St. Patrick. In 969 the Danes plundered and possessed 
this house; it reformed in 1247. 

At DUNDALK. An Hospital, founded for the sick and 
the aged of both sexes ; founded in the time of Henry II., 
by Berthram de Verdon, lord of the town; granted, with 
all the possessions, in town and country, 1 Elizabeth, to 
Henry Dray cot, at the yearly rent of !!/._, now worth 220 /. 

A Grey Friary, built in the time of Henry III., by 
Lord John de Verdun; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to 
James Brandon, at the fine of 91. 10s., and rent 6d., 
now worth 1907. 10s. 

At FAUGIIER, the native place of St. Brigid. A Nunnery, 
founded by St. Monenna, in the year 638, where she pre 
sided over 150 virgins, but resigned it to Orbilla or Servila, 
and built another Nunnery for herself at Kilsleive in the 
county of Armagh. 

A Priory of Canons, built in the early ages, and 
now become the Protestant place of worship. 
AtlNiSKiN. A Monastery, built by St. Dageus, smith 
to St. Kieron ; it is now protestantized. 

At KILCI.OGHER, on the Boyne. A Monastery, founded 
by St. Nectan, nephew to St. Patrick; now protestantized 
also. \ 

At KILSARAN. A Comniandery of Templars, founded in 
the twelfth century by Maud de Lacie ; it was given to the 
hospitalers, in the reign of Edward II. This house was 
rich in lands. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

At KNOCK, near Louth. An Augustine Prior}", founded 
in the year 1148, by Donchad Hua Kervail, prince of that 
country, and Eclaii Bishop of Clogher. This house and all 
the possessions were granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Sir John 
King, at the yearly rent of 16/. 5s. 4d., now worth 
325/. 6s. 8c/. 

At LOUTH. A noble Monastery and School, founded b} r 

St. Patrick, for St. Mocteus or Mochtalugh a Briton, who 

died 19th August 534, after the age of three hundred years. 

,The house and immense possessions were granted to Sir 

Oliver Pl.unket. 

At MELLIFONT, five x miles from Drogheda. A Cistercian 
Abbey, built by Donogh M Carroll, Prince of Uriel, to 
which St. Bernard sent the Monks from the Monastery of 
Clairvean in France, in the year 1142. A great Synod was 
held there in the year 1157, at which assisted the Arch 
bishop of Armagh, the then Pope s legate, together with 
many Bishops and Princes ; on this occasion many ricli 
presents were made to the Abbey, particularly by Murcher- 
tach O Loughlainn, King of Ireland; he gave 140 oxen, 
60 ounces of gold, and a townland near Drogheda, called 
Finnabhuir Naninghean ; O Carroll, Prince of Uriel, gave 
60 ounces of gold ; Dervorgilla, wife to O Rourke, Prince 
of Bremny, gave 60 ounces of gold, a gold chalice for the 
high altar, and vestments for nine other altars in the same 
house. This house, and its extensive possessions, were 
granted, in the year 1641, to Sir Gerald Moore. 

At MONASTERBOICE. A Religious house, founded by 
St. Bute, who died 7th December, 521. We find that it 
continued a celebrated school of religion, and both profane 
a-rid sacred literature, until the twelfth century, and, doubt 
less until the fifteenth. 

At TERFECKAN. A Monastery, founded in the year 
665. A Nunnery, founded in the year 1195, by 
M Mahon. By an inqusition taken, 33 Henry VIII., 
the last Abbess, Margaret Hobbert, Avas found to be seised 
of one hall, two houses in a ruinous state, a haggard, park 
wood, three gardens within the precincts of the Con 
vent, valued, besides reprises, 3s. 4c/. ; two messuages, two 
gardens, three parks, and five acres of land in Termonfeg- 
han, value, besides reprises, 17s. 4d. ; eight messuages, 
2 A 2 



LIST OF 



three parks, six acres, and three stangs of land, and one of 
meadow in Killiligger, value II.; thirteen messuages, four 
parks, one hundred acres of arable land and four of 
meadow, and twenty of pasture, in Killaghton, annual value, 
besides reprises, 41. 8s., and the church or rectory of Killagh 
ton, value 50*.; making together 81. 18s. Sd., now worth 
17SI. 13s. 4d.; granted, 20 April 1578, to Catharine Bruton. 



MAYO (COUNTY). 

At AGHAGOWER, five miles from Ballintobber. A Monas 
tery, built by St. Patrick for St. Senach ; now a Protestant 
place of worship. 

At AGHAMORE. A Monastery, built by St. Patrick, for 
his disciple St. Loarn ; now a Protestant place of worship. 

At ANXAGII. A Franciscan Friary; worth 13s. 4c?., 
now worth l 3l. 6s. Sd.; it stood to the year 1440, when 
Walter Lord M William Oughter died there. 

AtBALLOGH,in the Barony of Clonmorris. An Abbey, 
built by St. Mochuo, who was the first Abbot of it, and died 
in the year 637, whose feast falls on the 1st January. 

At B ALLEN TULLY. A Monastery, worth at the suppres 
sion, eight quarters of land, valued each 13s. 4d., now 
13/. 6s. Sd. each, or 106/. 13s. 4d. 

At BALLYHAUNES. An Augustine Friary, which was 
founded by the Nangle family, and which, according to an 
inquisition held 12 May 1608, possessed twelve acres of 
land. 

At BALLINA, on the river Moy. An Abbey; suppressed. 

At BALLYNASMALL. A Carmelite Friary, founded in 
the 13th century, by the Prendergasts ; Donogbuy O Gor- 
mealy was the last Prior, and possessed, at the suppression, 
lands worth yearly 13s. 4c/., now worth 13/. 6s. Sd.; granted 
to Sir John King. 

At BALLINROBE. An Augustine Friary; by an inquisi 
tion held 27 Elizabeth, the possessions were worth 14s. 10c?., 
now worth 14/. 16s. Sd. 

At BALLINTOBBER, or Town of Well. An Augustine 
Abbey, founded in the year 1216, by Cathol O Conogher, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

King of Connaught. Inquisition, held 36 Elizabeth, found 
this house possessed of many lands ; granted, in the year 
1605, to Sir John King. 

At BOGHMOYEN. A Franciscan Friary; dissolved. 

At BOPHIN ISLAND, in the Ocean, twelve miles from 
the Barony of Morisk. An Abbey, founded in the year 667, 
by St. Colman; in the year 916 died Abbot Fearadagh. 

At BORRISCARRA. A Carmelites Friary, which Pope 
John XXIII. gave, in the year 1412, to the Augustine 
Friars; at the general suppression it possessed one quarter 
of land, then valued at 13s. 4rf., now 131. 6s. Sd. 

At BOWFINAN. A Franciscan Friary, possessed at the 
suppression in the year 1608, four quarters of land and 
their appurtenances. 

At BURISHOOL. A Dominican Friary, built, as appears 
from the bull of Pope Innocent VIII., dated 9th February 
1486, by Richard de Burke, Lord M William Oughter, and 
the head of the Turlogh family ; consigned to Theobald 
Vincent Castillogalen. 

At CLARA, an Island near the Town of Morisk. A Car 
melite Friary, founded in the year 1 224. 

At CONG, formerly the royal residence of the Kings of 
Connaught, now but a miserable village, a magnificent 
Monastery, built by St. Fechan, who died in 664. jEneas 
M Donnell, the last Abbot, surrendered it at the general 
suppression ; granted, 10 December 1605, to Sir John King, 
, ancestor to the Earl of Kingstone, county of Cork. The 
ruins of several churches are seen there. 

At CROSS. A Monastery belonging to the Abbey of 
Balliritober. By an inquisition, held 27 Elizabeth, it pos 
sessed lands then valued at 13s. 4d., now 13Z. 6s. Sd. 

At CROSSMALYNE. An Abbey. In 1306, three men 
were indicted for assaulting and imprisoning the Abbot, and 
for taking away his goods and chattels, to the amount of ten 
marcs. By an inquisition of 27 Elizabeth, this house pos 
sessed four quarters of land, each valuing 13s. 4c?., now 
worth 13/. 6s. Sd. each, or 53/. 2s. Sd. the four. 

At DOMNAGHMORE. An Abbey, founded by St. Patrick, 
for St. Muckna. 



LIST OF 

At ER.EW. A Friary, erected at the extreme end of Erew, 
which is a peninsula, stretching out in the barony of Tiraw- 
ley, in which St. Leogar was Abbot ; his feast is held on 
the 30th September By an inquisition of 27th Elizabeth, 
it possessed one quarter of land, then worth 13s. 4c?., now 
I3J. 6s. Sd. 

At INCHMEAL, an Island, where there was an Abbey, in 
which Maoliosa, son of Thurlogh O Connor, was Abbot, in 
the year 1223. 

At INISTORMOR. Afc *Augustine Friary, built by Eugene 
O Gorman and Thady M Firbiss, on a spot of ground which 
was granted them, in the year 1454, by Thady O Dond, 
which grant was confirmed by a bull of Pope Nicholas V. 

At KILLECRAW. A Religious House was seised at the 
inquisition of 30 Elizabeth, of some lands w r orth 6s. yearly, 
now worth 61. 

At KILLEDAX. A Franciscan Friary, possessed, at the 
inquisition of 1608, several lands and tenements. 

At KILLXATRYXODA, or the Abbey of the Trinity, en 
dowed with a quarter of land. 

At KILFINIAN. An Abbey, founded by St. Finian. 

At KILMORMOYLE, in the Barony of Tirawley. A Mo 
nastery, founded by St. Olcan, disciple of St. Patrick, now 
a Protestant place of worship in the diocese of Killala. 

At KILNEGARVAN. A Church, founded by St. Fechan, 
who died in the year 664. 

At KDLVEN Y. A Franciscan Friary, which, according to 
an inquisition of 27 Elizabeth, was worth, in lands and te 
nements, 13s. 4d. yearly, now worth 131. 6s. Sd. 

At KILLYX. An Abbey was found, possessed, at the 
same time, of some lands. 

At MAYO. A Priory of Regular Canons, founded in the 
year 670, by St. Colman, who came over from Landisfarne, 
Northumberland. He was followed hither by St. Gerald 
and his three brothers, with three thousand disciples from 
England. Many illustrious saints and great men lived 
and died here; granted, 20 Elizabeth, to the Burgesses and 
Corporation of Galway ; rent 26/. 12s., now worth 53*21. 

A Nunnery, in which St. Segretia, the Abbess, (sister to 



ABBEYS, PIUORIES, &c. 

St. Gerald,) and one hundred virgin Nuns died of the plague 
in the year 664. 

At Mo RISK, a town on the Bay of Newport. An Au- 
gustin Friary, founded by the O Maillies, Lords of the 
country ; at the suppression it possessed lands valued at 
13s. 4d., now worth 131, 6s. Sd. 

At MOYNE. A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 
1460, by William O Rourke; granted, 37 Elizabeth, to Ed 
mund Barrett, with all the possessions, at 5s. rent, noipr 
worth 51. 

At RATI-IBRAN". A Dominican Friary, founded by the 
.Dexter family ; granted, in the year 1577, to Thomas Dex 
ter : the venerable ruins of the sacred edifice stand there 
amidst a few wretched cabins. 

At ROSSERICK. A Franciscan Friary, built by a Mr. 
Joice ; granted to James Garvey. There is here, and also 
in Moyne, a confessional of hewn stone for two confessors 
to sit in, and a hole in each side for the penitents to speak 
through. 

At STRADE, on the Moy, near Athletban. A Francis 
can Friary, built by the sept of M Jordan, but it was given 
to the Dominicans in the year 1252, by Jordan, of Exeter, 
Lord of Athlethan, at the request of Basilia his wife, 
daughter of Lord Meiler, of Birmingham; on the 18th of 
March, 1434, Pope Eugene IV. granted several indulgences 
to this house ; granted, 30 Elizabeth, to Patrick Barnwell. 

At TARMANCARRA. A Nunnery stood in the peninsula 
of Mullet. 

At URL A RE, in the Barony of Costello. A Dominican 
Friary, founded by the Wangle family, who afterwards 
took the name of Costello, and became Lords of the Barony. 
The Dominicans settled there in the year 1430. The house 
underwent two inquisitions, one on the 1*2 th of May, 1608, 
the other 24th of May, 1610 ; granted to Lord Dillon. 



LIST OF 



MEATH (COUNTY). 

At ARDBRAGCAN, a village in the Barony of Navan, 
an Abbey. 

At ARDEATIT, a village near Duleck. A church or per 
petual chantry, a priest was stationed, with the obligation 
of celebrating mass ; the chantry was a body corporate. The 
inquisition held 14 James found in possession of some lands 
against the statute. 

At ARD MULCH AN, near Painstown. There was a parish 
church ; a perpetual chantry of one priest ; but the in 
quisition of 10th James found it in possession of lands 
against the statute, which of course was sufficient cause for 
suppressing it ; value 17s. annually, now 17. 

At ARDSALLAGH, a village on the Boyne. A Monas 
tery, founded by St. Finian, who died 12th December, 563. 

At ATHBOY. A Carmelite Friary, founded on a site 
which was given by William, of London, in the year 1517, 
This Friary, with eleven messuages, three cellars, one or 
chard, and six gardens, in Athboy, with four acres of mea 
dow, called the Friar s meadow in Advenston; were granted 
34 Henry VIII. to Thomas Casey for ever, at the yearly 
rent of 2s., now worth Zl. 

At BALLYBOGAN, or Priory DE LAUDE DEI. An Au- 
gustin Friary, founded in the 12th century by Jordan Co- 
min. This house was granted, 34 Henry VIII., to Lord 
Carbray, at the yearly rent of 41. 3s. 4d,, now worth 
83/. 6s. Sd. : some of the possessions were granted 4 Eliza 
beth to Edward Fitzgerald. 

At BEAU EEC. A church of St. Mary and St. Laurence, 
endowed in the reign of King John, by Walter de Lacie, 
stood until the 14th century, and, without doubt, until the 
general dissolution. 

At BECTIFF, near Trim. A Cistercian Monastery, 
founded in the year 1146, by Murchard O Melaghlin, King 
of Meath ; surrendered, 34 Henry VIII., with all the pos 
sessions. 

At CLONARD. An Abbey of Canons, founded by St. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

Finian. This Abbey, with all the possessions, were granted, 
6 Edward VI., to Thomas Cusacke, at the yearly rent of 
8/., now worth 160Z. ; some of the possessions were granted, 
8 Elizabeth, to Richard Hayne ; rent 31. 8s. 6c?., now worth 
68/. 10s. : another parcel of the possessions was granted, 
36 Elizabeth, to William Browne< 

At COLPE, a village on the Boyne. An Abbey of regular 
Canons, founded in the year 1182, by Hugh de Lacie. 
" At the suppression of Monasteries, the Prior was seised of 
the following tithes in Meath : Colpe, eight couple of corn ; 
Newtown, one and half; St. James, one ; Pylleston, one: 
Ballangstone, four and half; Paynstone, two and half." 

At DISERTTOLA. An Abbey, founded by St. Tola, who 
was made Bishop of Clonard, and died L in the year 733. 
This house stood until the 12th century. 

At DONNYGARNEY. A Nunnery, granted to Miss Dray- 
cot, who married a Mr. Talbot. 

At DONOGH PATRICK, an Abbey, founded by Cono! 
O Neil. 

At DROGHEDA. A Priory of Hospitalers, founded in the 
time of Joan, or principally endowed by Walter de Lacie. 
It possessed immense revenues, though they were granted, 
6 Edward VI., to James Sedgrave, for 10s. Wd. yearly 
rent ; now worth 2 1 . 

A Carmelite Friary, built by the inhabitants of 
Drogheda. There were two grants made, one by the 
Corporation, in the time of Edward II., of eighty 
virgates of land, and another by William Messager, of 
Drogheda, in the time of Edward III., in the year 
1346, of four acres of land to the Friars, for the pur 
pose of maintaining lights before the image of the 
Blessed Virgin in this church. 

At DULEEK, an Abbey, the extensive possessions of 
which were granted, 10 James I., to Sir Gerald Moor. 

A Priory of the Virgin Mary. Several inquisitions 
were held on this house ; all the possessions were granted 
to Sir Gerald Moor; rent 91. Us. 7c?., now worth 
191 /. Us. 8d. 

An Hospital, founded before the year 1403, 
2 A 5 



LIST OF 

At DUNSHAGHLIN. A Church, founded by St. Seachlan. 

At INDENEIST, near Slane, an Abbey. 

At KELLS, a celebrated Monastery, founded about the 
year 550. Henry VIII. granted it, in the 34th year of his 
reign, to Gerald Fleming and to Sir Gerald Plunket. 

A Priory or Hospital, founded in this town, in the 
time of Richard I., by Walter de Lucie, lord of Meath. 
This house was surrendered by the last Prior, with the 
several possessions, 31 Henry VIII., and granted, 
8 Elizabeth, to Richard Slayne, at the yearly rent of 
14/. 10s., now worth 290Z. 

A Chantry for three priests. 

At KILBERUY, near Navan. A Chantry of two 
priests or chaplains. 

At KILLEEX, a Priory of Canons, founded by St. Eudeus, 
in the year 540. 

A Nunnery, built by St. Eudeus previous to the 
year 580. 

At KILMAINIIAMBEG, twelve miles north of Navan. 
A Commandery of Templars, founded in the time of 
Richard I., by Walter de Lacie, Lord of Meath. This 
Commandery was granted,. 33 Elizabeth, to Sir Patrick 
Barnwall, at the yearly rent of 631. 12s. 2|<i., now worth 
1,272/. 4s. 2c?. ; now the Church. 

At KILMAIXIIAM WOOD. A Commandery of Hospi 
talers, buiitin the 13th century, by the Prestons. Granted, 
23d Sept. 1587, to Henry Duke, at the yearly rent of 41. 10s., 
now worth 90/. 

At KILSHIRE. An Abbey, founded in the year 580. , 

At LISMULLIN, near Tarah. A Nunnery, founded in 
the year 1240. This house, with its valuable possessions, 
were granted, 33 Henry VIII., to Gerald Earl of Kildare 
and to Mabell his wife, and to Robert Harrison. 

At LOUGH SHILLEN, near Cavan. A Friary, built on 
an island in this lake, which is still a remarkable burying- 
place. 

At NAVAN. A Monastery, built or rebuilt in the 12th 
century, by Joceline de Angulo or Nangle ; it stood with a 
great deal of celebrity until 31 Henry VIII.; it was granted, 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

with all the possessions ; the horse-barrack is now erected 
on the scite of it. 

At NEWTOWJT. A Priory of Canons, founded in the 
year 1206, by Simon de Rochfort ; it flourished for many 
centuries, and possessed many valuable lands and tene 
ments; granted by the Parliament, in the year 1536, to 
King Henry VIII. ; he granted, in 1550, a parcel of them 
to Henry Draycot, at 4/. yearly rent, now worth SOI. 

A Priory or Hospital of Cross-bearers, or Crouched- 
friars, founded by the Bishop of Meath, in the 13th 
century ; granted to Robert Dillon. 
At ODDER. A Nunnery, founded by the Barnwall fa 
mily, before the year 1195. This house, and all the pos 
sessions, were granted, 15th Elizabeth, to Richard Power, 
At PIERSTOWX. An Abbey, founded in the early ages. 
AtRATiiossAiN. A Monastery, founded by Saint Ossan, 
who died 17th February 686. 

At RATOATH, thirteen miles north of Dublin ; an Abbey 
that possessed, in the reign of Henry III., forty acres of land, 
value 6s. 8c?., now worth 6/. 13s. 4d. 

A Chantry for three priests ; by the inquisition of 
Henry VIII., they were found to possess some lands 
contrary to statute, arid were suppressed. 
At ROSSE, near Tarah. An Abbey, founded by St. Coe- 
man Breae, who died 14th Sept. 614. 

At SHRINE, an Abbey of regular Canons; granted, 34 
Henry VIII., to Thomas Cusack, at the rent of 5d., now 
worth 8s. 4d. 

A Chantry. 

At SLANE, an Abbey of regular Canons; this house, 
with all the possessions, were granted, 32 Henry VIII., to, 
James Fleming, Knt. ; rent Id. yearly, now worth Is. Sd. 

At TELTOWN, or KILTALTOX. A Church, founded by 
St. Abbon ; now a Protestant place of worship. 
At TREVET, a large Monastery. 

At TRIM, a magnificent Monastery, founded by St. Patrick. 
This house was granted, 3% Henry VIII., with all the lands, 
&c., to Antony St. Leger, Knt. 

A Gray Friary, founded by King John, but granted, 



LIST OF 

with all the appurtenances, 34 Henry VIII. , to Lod- 
wicke OTudor parson of Roslaye, John Morye parson 
of Walterston, and John Wakely; rent 21. 10s., now 
worth 21. 8s. 4c?. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1263, by 
Geoffry de Geneville, lord of Meath ; there was a great 
Synod held in this church, in the year 1291. 

A Priory of Cross-bearers, a magnificent building; 
the Parliament, in the years 1484, 1487, and 1491, 
was held in the spacious hall of it ; granted, with all 
the possessions, to Sir Thomas Cusack, 27 Henry VIII., 
at the rent of 8s. 5d. yearly, now worth SI. 8s. 4d. 

A Nunnery, founded by some person unknown. 

A Church of Grecians, founded very anciently. 

A Chantry for three priests. 



MONAGHAN (COUNTY). 

At CLONES, a small town. A Priory of regular Canons. 
Elisabeth granted the hcuse and possessions, in the 29th of 
her reign, to Sir Henry Duke. 

At MONAGHAN, a Monastery, built by St. Moeldodius, 
before the 8th century; granted to Edward Withe; Lord 
Blaney has erected a castle on the site. 

At TEH ALLAN, in the barony of Monaghan. A religious 
house, in which St. Killian was abbot. 



QUEEN S (COUNTY). 

ABBEY LEIX, founded in the year 1183, by Corcherger 
O Moore, for Cistercian Monks. There were two inquisi 
tions held on this house, one 5 Edward VI., and the other 
5 Elizabeth, when the lands were estimated at 820 acres,, and 
were let to the Earl of Ormond for 101. 5s. yearly rent,, 
now worth 205 /. 

At AGIIABOB, four miles from Montrath, a magnificent 
Monastery, founded by St, Canice. The Monastery, with 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

its appurtenances, were granted, 43 Elizabeth, to Florence 
Fitzpatrick; rent 51. 18s., now worth 118/. 

At AG ii MAC ART, four miles west of D arrow, Upper Os 
sory, an Abbey, built about the year 550 ; also a Priory, 
granted, 43 Elizabeth, together with several other Monas 
teries and parcels of their possessions, to Florence Fitzpatrick, 
at the rent of 36/. 8s. 2d., now worth 728Z. 3s. 4d. 

At ANN AT RIM, in Upper Ossory. An Abbey, founded 
about the year 550 ; now a Protestant place of worship. 

At CLONEN AGH, a village in the barony of Maryborough. 
A magnificent Monastery, founded by St. Fintan. It is 
now a Protestant place of worship in the diocese of Leighlin. 

At DESERT ENOS, two miles south east of Maryborough. 
This is now called Desert, and is a Protestant place of wor 
ship, in the diocese of Leighlin. 

At DESERT O DRAIN, in the territory of Hyfalgia. 

At KILLEDELIG, in Upper Ossory, a Monastery, now a 
Church. 

At KILLEBANE, four miles south west of Athy. A sump 
tuous Abbey, built by St. Abban, about the year 650 ; now 
a Church. 

At KILLORMOGH, in Upper Ossory. An Abbey, built 
by St. Columb, about the year 558 ; now a place of worship. 

AtLEAMCiiuiLL. An Abbey, built by St.Finton-chorach, 
in the sixth century. 

AtMuNDREiiiD, in Upper Ossory. A Monastery, built 
by St. Lasren, in the year 600. 

At ROSSTUIRG. An Abbey near the mountain of Sliev 
Bloom, governed by St. Brendan. 

At SLETTY, near Carlow. An Abbey, by St. Ficah. 

At STRADBALLY. A Franciscan Friary, founded in the 
twelfth century, by Lord O Mora; granted, with all the 
possessions, in the year 1592, to Francis Cosbey, by Knight s 
service, or the twentieth part of a Knight s fee, and at the 
annual rent of 111. 6s. 3o?., now worth 346 1. 5s. 

At TIMOHOE. A Monastery, built by St. Mochoe, who 
died in the year 497 ; there is a round tower, with some 
ruins of the ancient building to be seen yet. 



LIST OF 



ROSCOMMON (COUNTY.) 

At ARDCARXA, in the Barony of Boyle. An Abbey of 
Regular Canons ; granted, 39 Eliz., to the Provost and 
Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin, with eighty acres of land 
in Cloncalliagh ; six acres of land in Kilgefin. 

A Nunnery of Benedictines, which was a cell to the 
Abbey of Kilcreunata, in the county of Galway. 

At AGIIDALAIIAGH. An Abbey of Canons, where Com- 
gallan was Bishop in the time of St. Patrick. This Abbey 
existed in the year 1201. 

At ATHJLONE, a Cistercian Abbey. It was enriched by 
grants from King John and King Edward I. Granted, 
with the possessions, 20 Eliz., to Edmond O Fallon of 
Athlone. 

At BASLICK, three miles south of Castlereagh, an 
Abbey ; now a Protestant place of worship. 

At BEALA^ENY. A Franciscan Friary; granted, to 
gether with the possessions, to Edmorid O Fallon of Ath 
lone, at the yearly rent of 21. 4s. 7e?., now worth 44/. 11s. 8c?. 

At BOYLE. A celebrated Cistercian Abbey, granted, 
with all the property, in the year 1603, to Sir John King. 

4t CALDRYWOLAGH, in the Barony of Boyle. A Fran 
ciscan Friary j granted, 24 Aug. 1582, to Bryan M Dermot, 
at the yearly rent of 9s. 4d., now worth 94Z. 

At CLONRAHAST. A Franciscan Monastery, built by 
O Conor, in the reign of Henry VIII. 

At CLONSHAVILL. An Abbey, built by S^ Patrick; 
granted to Lord Dillon. 

At CLOUNTIIUSKERT, seven miles north east of Ros- 
common. A Priory, founded in the early ages, by St. 
Faithlec ; granted, 3*3 Eliz., to Fryal O Farrell, for 21 years, 
at the rent of III. 9s. 8d., now worth 229 J. 1 3s. 4d. 

At CLOONCRAFF. A Monastery, founded by St. Patrick ; 
it existed in the 12th century ; now a Protestant place of 
worship. 

At CLOAIXEMUIN. An Abbey existed in the llth cen 
tury. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

AtEDARDRuiM. An Abbey, founded by St. Diradius, 
brother to St. Canoe, who flourished in the year 492 ; now 
a Protestant place of worship. 

. At ELPHIN. A Church, founded by St. Patrick, for 
St. Assicus. The house and possessions were granted to 
Terence O Birne. 

At FITHARD, in South Connaught. An Abbey, built by 
St. Patrick, for St. Justus ; now a Protestant place of 
worship. 

At INCH M A CN ERIN, an Island in Loughree. A Monas 
tery ; granted, with the extensive possessions in lands and 
tithes, 28 Elizabeth, to William Taaffe, who assigned them 
to Thomas Spring. 

At INC HMO RE, an Island in Loughree. A Priory of 
Canons, built, as people think, by St. Liberius, whose me 
mory is held in much honour on the island even to this day ; 
granted, 9 Elizabeth, to Lord Delvin, for 21 years, at 
61. 14s. 8d. rent, now worth 134:1. 13s. 4d. 

At KILCOOLEY. An Abbey, built by St. Olcan; now 
a Protestant place of worship. 

At KILLARAGIIT. A Nunnery, built by St. Patrick, for 
St. Athracta. The inquisition held 10 Aug. 33 Elizabeth, 
the Abbess of this house was seised of three carucates of 
land near the water of Lorgbella ; two to the north of the 
waters, and on the west ; the whole valued at 5s. besides 
reprises. Granted to Terence O Birne, who assigned it to 
the Earl of Clanrickard. 

At KILLUCKIN, four miles north of Elphin. A Nunnery, 
where St. Lunechaixia is honoured ; she was born before the 
year 637 ; now a Protestant place of worship. 

At KILMORE. An Abbey, built by St. Patrick ; now 
Protestantized. 

A Priory, built by Con. O Flanagan, and consecrated 
by Donogh O Conor Bishop of Elphin, in the year 1232, 
granted in the year 1.580, for 21 years, to Tyren 
O Farrell; rent 31. 10s., now worth 701. ; granted 
afterwards to Sir Patrick Barn wall. 

At KILLOMY. A Monastery, founded before the year 
760. 

At KILTULLAGII. A Franciscan Friary, founded about 
the year 1441. 



LIST OP 

At KNOCKVICAR. A Monastery of Dominicans, founded 
four miles east of the town ; granted, 26 Elizabeth, together 
with the Abbey of Tocmonia, Clonemeaghan, and Court, 
in the county of Sligo, to Richard Kendlemarch. 

At LOUGHKEE, in this Lake, is Trinity Island, where 
stood a Monastery dedicated to the Holy Trinity, in the year 
700; rebuilt in 1215, by Clarus M Moylon, Archdeacon 
of Elphin; granted, 10 August, 36 Elizabeth, with all the 
possessions, to Robert Harrison, for ever, in free soccage, at 
261. 13s- 8c/., now worth 5331. 13s. 4rf. 

At LYSDUFFE. A Priory in O Conor s Country ; granted 
to the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin. 

At MONASTERE VAN, a Monastery. 

At ORAN, five miles west of Roscommon. A Monastery 
built by St. Patrick; continues a remarkable place for pil 
grimage ; now the Protestant place of worship. 

At RANDOWX, seven miles north of Athlone. A Priory 
of Hospitalers or Crossbearers, built in the reign of King 
John. Phil Nangle was a great benefactor in the reign of 
Henry III. This town died away, as well as the castle. 

A Priory, founded by Clarus Archdeacon of Elphin. 

ROSCOMMON, a town that has acquired much respecta 
bility from its monastic edifices. 

An Abbey of Regular Canons, founded by St. Coe- 
mon, disciple of St. Finian. This house was granted, 
20 Elizabeth, with the appurtenances, to Sir Nicholas 
Malleye; rent 30/. 5s. 10d, now worth 605Z. 18s. 4d. 

i A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1253; 
granted, with all the possessions, 29 Jan. 1615, to 
Francis Viscount Valentia. 

At TEAGHNEVIGHEAN. A religious house in Con- 
naught, where the seven daughters of Fergus are honoured. 

At TIBSHIIST. A Church, and formerly a great School; 
but now a Protestant place of worship. 

At TOBERELLY, in the plain of Roscommon. A Fran 
ciscan Cell ; it possessed some lands of the value of 13s. 4d. 9 
now worth 131. 6s. 8d. 

At TOEMONIA. A Franciscan Monastery, founded by 
O Connor ; granted, with all the lands, 30 Elizabeth, for 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

twenty-one years, to Richard Kyndelirske, at the yearly 
rent of 21. 17s. 2|c/., now worth 57 /. 4s. 2d. 

At TULSK, a Dominican Monastery, built in the 15th 
century, by M Duill. It fell under the inquisition which 
was held 33 Elizabeth. 



SLIGO (COUNTY). 

At ACHOSTRY, a small Village and Episcopal See. An 
Abbey. 

At AKEIIAS, or KILMATIN. A Priory, founded in the 
year 1280, by the O Donalds. By the inquisition, this 
house was found to possess lands to the value of 16/. 8s. 4c?., 
now worth 308/. 6s. 8d. 

At ARDN AX Y. A Monastery for Eremites, following the 
rule of Augustine, built in the year 1427. 

At ATHMEY. A Premonstratensian Monastery, founded 
by Clarus M Maylin, Archdeacon of Elphin, in the year 
1251 ; possessions were granted to Robert Harrisson, who 
assigned them to William Crofton. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1243, by 
David M Kelly, Archbishop of Cashell; granted 35 
Henry VIII., with the appurtenances, to Walter Flem 
ing, at the yearly rent of 2s. 6c?., now worth 21. 10s. 

Hare Abbey, or St. Mary s Abbey, of the rock of 
Cashell, founded by the Benedictines, but given, in the 
course of time, to the Cistercian Monks. This really 
splendid edifice was richly endowed; granted to 
Thomas Sinclair, 42 Elizabeth, at the yearly rent of 
2s., now worth 2/. ,. 

Hacket s Abbey, belonging to the Franciscans. The 
house and its possessions were valued, when surrendered 
by the last Prior, at 3J. 10s. 2d. ; granted 30 Henry 
VIII., for ever, to Edmond Butler, Archbishop of 
Cashell, at the yearly rent of 2s. 10c?., now worth 
2J. 16s. Sd. 

At CLONAUL. An Hospital of Hospitalers, founded 
before trie thirteenth century. 



LIST OF 

At CLONMELL. A Dominican Friary, founded in the 
year 1269. 

A Franciscan Friary, built in the year 1269, by 
Otho de Graudison. There was a miraculous image of 
St. Francis. This splendid house and all its extensive 
possessions were granted 34 Henry VIII., to James 
Earl of Ormond and to the Commonalty of Clonmell. 
At DOXAGIIMORE, in the barony of Offa and Iffa. 
There was an Abbey by St. Farannan ; now a Protestant 
place of worship. 

At EMLY, an ancient and celebrated Archiepiscopal city, 
in the county of Tipperary. 

A Monastery, founded by St. Ailbe, who was styled 
a second St. Patrick ; he died in the year 527, and 
was interred here. 

At FETHERD. An Augustine Monastery. By an inqui 
sition of 31 Henry VIII., this house had possessions to the 
amount of 11. 13s. 4d., now worth 153/. 6s. Sd. Granted 
to Sir Edmund Butler, at the yearly rent of 5s. 4c?., now 
worth 51. 6s. Sd. 

At HOLY CROSS. A Cistercian Monastery, built by 
Donogh O Brien, King of Limerick. This was a sumptuous 
house, and was very richly endowed in lands and other te- 
tements. Granted 5 Elizabeth, with all the appurtenances, 
to Gerald Earl of Ormond. at the yearly rent of 15/. 10s. 4c?., 
now worth 310;. 6s. Sd. 

At INISLOUXAGH, in the barony of Offa and Iffa, on the 
Suir. An Abbey, founded by St. Mochoemse, who died 
on the 13th March 655; he was succeeded by Congan, 
about the year 1153, who supplied St. Bernard with ma 
terials for writing the Life of St. Malachy. Donald O Brien, 
King of Limerick, rebuilt this Monastery in 1187, and en 
dowed it, wkh the assistance of Malachy O Foelan, Prince 
of the Decies ; granted 33 Elizabeth to Edward Geogh ; 
rent 24/., now worth 480/. There is a holy well, which is 
frequented by people from all quarters. 

At KILCOMIN. A Benedictine Priory, founded by Philip 
of Worcester, chief governor of Ireland, in the year 1184. 
He supplied it with friars from the abbey of Glastonbury. 

At KILCOELY. A Cistercian Abbey, built by Donogh 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

Carbragh O Brien, in the year 1200 ; it Ijad extensive pos 
sessions; granted 31 Henry VIII., to Thomas Earl of 
Ormond. 

At KILMORE, in Upper Orrnond. An Abbey, founded in 
the year 540; now a Protestant place of worship. 

At KILLIXEXALLAGH. A Franciscan Friary, built 
in the time of Henry VI. ; granted 35 Henry VIII., with 
the possessions, to Dermot Ryan ; rent 4d. Irish, now worth 
6s. Sd. 

At LORIIAH, a small village in Lower Ormond, near the 
Shannon. An Abbey, founded by St. Ruadan> who presided 
over 150 monks, and died in the year 584. Turgesius and 
his Norwegians burnt and destroyed this town, with all the 
religious houses, in the year 845. This is now a Protestant 
place of worship. 

A Dominican Friary, founded in the year 1269, by 
Walter de Burgo, King of Ulster. 

At MONANCIIA, situated almost in the centre of the great 
bog of Monela, three miles south east of Roscrea, a Mo 
nastery of Culdean Monks. The house and revenues were 
granted 28 Elizabeth to Sir Lucas Dillon. 

At MOYLAGII, two miles west of Carrick. A Nunnery, 
under the invocation of St. Brigid ; granted to Sir Henry 
Radcliff. 

At NENAGII. An Hospital for Augustines, who were to 
attend constantly the sick and infirm ; it was endowed by 
Theobald Walter. Though the possessions of this house 
were immense, they were granted, together with the house 
itself, 5 Elizabeth, to Oliver Grace, for the rent of 
391. Os. lOd, now worth 780J. 16s. Sd. 

A Franciscan Friary, built in the reign of Henry III., 
by the Butler family ; granted 30 Elizabeth, to Ro 
bert Collum, at the yearly rent of 22/. 17s. 8c?., now 
worth 4571. 13s. 4d. 

At ROSCREA. A magnificent Monastery, built by Saint 
Cronan. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1490, by 
Mulruany na Feasoige O Carroll, or by his wife 
Bibiana. An inquisition wag held 27 Dec, 1568; 



LIST OF 

this house and the possessions were granted to the Earl 
of Ormond, who assigned the same to William Crow. 
THURLES. A Carmelite Monastery, founded in the 
year 1300, by the family ef Butler ; granted, together with 
the possessions, to the Earl of Ormond. 

TIPPER A RY. A Monastery of Augustin Eremites, founded 
in the reign of Henry III. ; granted, with the possessions, 
.34 Henry VIII., to Dermot Ryan ; rent Sd. Irish, now 
worth 13s. 4c?. 

TIRDAGLASS, on the bank of Lough Derg. A Monas 
tery, founded by St. Columba, a disciple of St. Finian ; he 
died of the plague in the year 552. His feast falls on 
13 Dec. and the feast of St. Aidbeus falls on 24 May. 
Many illustrious saints and scholars flourished in this house 
until the twelfth century. 

TOOME, six miles south of Tipperary. A Priory of 
Canons. St. Donan was honoured here, and it is supposed 
that he was the founder. Queen Elizabeth granted this for 
twenty-one years to Miler Magragh, Archbishop of Cashell. 



TYRONE (COUNTY). 

ARDBOE. A noble and celebrated Monastery, built by 
St. Colman. 

BALLIINESAGART, in the Barony of Dungannon. A 
Franciscan Friary, buik by Con. O Neilin the year 1489. 

CLOG HER. An episcopal see and borough, three miles 
and a half south west of Lurgan. A Priory of regular Ca 
nons, presided over by St. Patrick, who resigned it to St. 
Kertern, who founded the celebrated abbey here. King 
James granted this abbey and revenues to George Montgo 
mery, Bishop of Clogher. 

CLUAIXDUBHAIX, near Clogher. A large Nunnery, 
founded by St. Patrick. 

COROCK. A Franciscan Monastery, built in the fifteenth 
century ; granted to Sir Henry Piers. 

DONNAGIIMORE, three miles west of Dungannon. An 
Abbey, built by St. Patrick, in which St. Columb was 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

honoured ; it stcod until the thirteenth century, and of 
course until the general dissolution. 

DUNG ANN ON, a borough town. A Franciscan Friary, 
built by Con. O Neil, in the reign of Henry VII. ; granted 
to Richard Earl of Westmeath, who assigned it to Sir 
Arthur Chichester. 

GERVAGHKERIN. A Franciscan Friary, built in the 
fifteenth century; granted to Sir Henry Piers, with the friary 
of Corock, 

OMAGH. An Abbey, founded in the early ages, and in 
the fifteenth century a Franciscan Friary ; granted with the 
friary of Corock. 

PUBLE. A Franciscan Friary, founded in the fifteenth 
century ; granted to Sir Henry Piers. 



WATERFORD (COUNTY). 

ACHADDAG A IN. An Abbey, by St. Dogain, who was a 
strenuous supporter of the ancient mode of celebrating 
Easter. 

ARDMORE, a village four miles east of Youghal. An 
Abbey, founded by St. Declan, whose feast falls on 24 July. 
St. Ultan, his successor, was living after the year 550. The 
splendid round tower, and stately ruins of several churches ; 
the Adam and Eve, with the tree and serpent ; the judg 
ment of Solomon, all in alto relievo, strike the traveller s 
mind with awe, as well as with regret for its fallen de 
graded state from its ancient wealth and piety. 

BALLYVONY, six miles north-east of Dungorvan. A 
large building in ruins, 1 50 feet by 90, which is supposed 
to be a Commandery of Hospitalers. 

BEWLEY, two miles south of Lismore. An Hospital of 
Hospitalers, in ruins. 

CAPPAGH, three miles and a half west of Dangorvan. 
The ruins of a Commandery of Hospitalers. 

CARRICKBEG, near Carrick-on-Suir. A Franciscan 
Friary, built in the year 1336, by the Earl of Ormond; 
granted, 31 Henry VIII., to Thomas Earl of Ormond. The 



LIST OF 

steeple still remains, a very curious building, about sixty 
feet high, rising like a pyramid, which point begins several 
feet from the ground in the middle of the church. 

CLASIIMORE, three miles and a half north of Youghal. 
An Abbey, founded by Cuanceor, according to the orders 
of Mochoemoc, who had raised Cuanchear from the dead ; 
that saint died 13th March, 655. Granted to Sir Walter 
Raleigh. 

CROOK E, on the bay, four miles from Waterford, A 
Commandery, founded in the thirteenth century, for the 
Hospitalers, by the Baron of Curraghmore ; granted, 
27 Elizabeth, to Antony Power, for sixty years ; rents 12/. 
11s. 10d., now worth 2511; 16s. Sd. 

DUNG ARYAN. There was a Priory of Canons, founded 
in the seventh century, by St. Garbhan, a disciple of St. 
Finbar. 

An Augustin Friary, founded by Thomas Lord 
Offaley ; the O Briens were benefactors ; granted, with 
sundry lands, 37 Elizabeth, for twenty-one years, to 
Roger Dalton; rent40/. 10s., now worth 810/. There 
was an hospital also under the invocation of St. Brigid. 

KILBARRY, one mile and a half from Waterford. An 
Hospital of Hospitalers. 

KILLUNKART, near Dungarvari. A Commandery of 
Hospitalers. 

KILLURE, two miles east of Waterford. A Commandery 
of Hospitalers ; granted, together with revenues, 25 Eliza 
beth, to Nicholas Aylmer, for fifty years, at the yearly rent 
of 131. 6s. 8rf., now worth 266J. 16s. 8rf. 

Kilmboynan Abbey had a house in Waterford; called 
the Old Court, which could not escape the all-seeing 
inquisition of Elizabeth. 

LISMORE. An Abbey of regular Canons, founded by 
St. Mocheda, in the year 630, together with a celebrated 
school ; though St. Senan, St. Lugad, St. Neman, and St. 
Madoc, seem to have been there bishops before him. Cor- 
cran Cleirach, anachorite of all Ireland, died at Lismore, in 
the year 1 140. He was a celebrated divine ; and so greatly 
excelled all the western Europe in religion and learning, that 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

every contest throughout the kingdom was referred to him. 
In 1127 Cormac McCarthy, King of Munster, being de 
throned, he was compelled to go on a pilgrimage to Lismore, 
where he erected two churches. In 1135 Daniel O Brien, 
King of Dublin, resigned his crown, and died a professed 
monk in this house. 

An Hospital for Lepers, founded under the invoca 
tion of St. Brigid. 

A Cell of Anachorites, appertaining to the church 
of Lismore. 

MOLANA, an island in the Black Water, two miles and 
a half above Waterford. There was an Abbey, founded in 
the sixth century by St. Molanfide. Queen Elizabeth 
granted this house and possessions to Sir Walter Raleigh, 
who assigned them to the Earl of Cork. 

MOTH EL, two miles south of Carrick. An Augustin 
Monastery, built by St. Brogan, and Was succeeded by St. 
Coan in the sixth century ; granted, 33 Henry VIII., with 

all the possessions, to Butler and Peter Power ; rent 

61. 4s., now worth 128/. 

RUIN CREW, two miles west of Youghal. An Hospital of 
Hospitalers ; granted to Sir Walter Raleigh, who assigned 
it to the Earl of Cork. 

WATERFORD, a large commercial sea port. An Au 
gustin Priory, founded by the Ostmen ; it was richly 
endowed by different persons in the course of time ; granted, 
with several other possessions, 31 Elizabeth, to Elizabeth 
Butler, alias Sherlock, for twenty-one years; rent 471. 
5s. Sd., now worth 2,345J. 13s. 4d. 

The Hospital of St. Stephen, founded for Lepers, by 
the Power family. 

The Priory of St. .John the Evangelist, founded in 
the year 1 185, by John Earl of Morton, for the Bene 
dictines. This house received several grants of lands 
and tenements. Granted to William Wyse, Esq., at 
the annual rent of a knight s fee. 

The Monastery of our Saviour, built by the Domi 
nicans, in the reign of Henry III. ; granted, 34 Henry 
VIII., to James White ; rent 4s., now worth 41. The 
County Court House is called Black Friars. 



LIST OF 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1240, by 
Lord Hugh Purcell, who was interred here the same 
year, by the side of the high altar; granted, 33 Henry 
VIII, to Patrick Walsh and scholars, at the yearly rent 
of 8s., now worthS/.; and a fine of 1511. 13s. 4d., 
now worth 3,033Z. 6s. Sd. The Holy Ghost Hospital 
has been erected on a part of the ruins of this priory. 



WESTMEATH (COUNTY). 

ARDCHARN. An Abbey by St. Beoaid, who died the 
8th March, 523. 

ATHLONE. This town is built on the river Shannon, 
partly in the county of Roscommon and partly in the county 
of Westmeath. A Monastery was built on this side for 
Franciscans, by Charles, or Cathal Croibh Dearg O Connor, 
Prince of Connaught ; and by Sir Henry Dillon, who was 
interred here. 

ATHRECARNE. A Dominican Friary, built in the four 
teenth century, by Robert Dillon, of Drumrany granted, 
with all its possessions in this county, 37 Henry VIII., to 
Robert Dillon, at the fine of 13/. 13s. 4rf., now worth 273 J. 
6s. 8d. : and a rent of 6c/., now worth 10s. 

BALLIMORE, on Lough-Seudy, ten miles west of Mul- 
lingar. A Monastery, founded before the year 700. 

An Abbey, built in the year 1218, by the family of 
Lacie, for Nuns and Friars : they lived under the same 
roof, but in different apartments. This house had ex 
tensive possessions, and underwent several inquisitions 
in the reigns of Henry VIII. and Elizabeth. 

CLONFAD, five miles and a half east of Mullingar. A 
Church, founded by St. Ethchen, who died in the year 577. 
Clonfad is now a Chapel. 

CLONRANE, seven miles south of Mullingar. An Abbey, 
inhabited by several Saints from the sixth to the tenth cen 
tury; suppressed. 

COMRAIRE, near the hill of Usmeach. An Abbey, in 
which St. Colman was honoured ; he died in the year 652. 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, drc. 

DRUMRANY, or DRUM RATH, six miles north-east of 
Athlone. An Abbey, built in the year 588. In the year 
946 this house, with 150 persons in it, was burnt to the 
ground by the Ostmen. 

At DYSART, four miles south of Mullingar. An Abbey, 
built by St. Colman ; it became a Franciscan Friary before 
the year 1331. 

At FARRENENAMANAGHE. The inquisition of James, in 
the third year of his reign, finds this Abbey in ruins, though 
possessed of a certron of land, tithes, and other tenements, 
value I2d., now worth H. 

FARREN-MAC-HICKEES. The inquisition of James III. 

finds the ruins of a Nunnery that was possessed of some lands . 

There was an abbey here; and it is recorded that 

in the year 665, St. Finchin governed three thousand 

Monks in it. 

FORE, once a celebrated town, now an obscure village. 
This abbey and possessions made, according to the inquisi 
tion held, 31 Henry VIII., 161/. 12s., now worth 3,232J. 
yearly; granted in the year 1588, for thirty-one years, to 
Christopher Baron of Delvin. 

At CLONCALL, bordering on Kilkenny West. A Monas 
tery, built in the year 486, by St. Munis ; now a chapel. 

At HARE ISLAND, in Loughree. A Monastery, built by 
the family of Dillon. 

At KEXARD, near the county of Longford, north of Inny. 
A Nunnery, built early. 

At KILL ARE, in the barony of Raconrath. Three 
churches, one dedicated to St. Aid, another called Temple 
Brigid, and the third the Court of St. Brigid ; there were 
three holy wells. St. Cuman was abbot here. 

At KILBEGGAN, a borough town, A Monastery, built by 
St. Becan. Another Monastery, founded on the same, re 
built in the year 3200, by the family of Dalton. This 
abbey, and all its extensive possessions, were granted, after 
having undergone several inquisitions in the reign of Henry 
VIII. and his son Edward VI., to be held of the King and 
of the Castle of Dublin, in free and common soccage. 

At KILBEXY, an ancient town adorned with a castle 
2 B 



LIST OF 

belonging to the Lacie family ; and a Monastery or an Hos 
pital for the lepers, under the invocation of St. Brigid ; it 
stood until the fifteenth century. 

KILCONIREGII and CONRY were 1 chapels in the barony 
of Moycashsll ; St. Fearfio, son of a smith, was abbot in 
the year 758. 

At KILKENNY West. A Friary, built by Thomas, a 
priest and friar, the grandson of Sir Thomas Dillon, who 
came into Ireland, in the year 1185 ; granted, with the pos 
sessions, 1 1 Elizabeth, to Robert Dillon ; rent 227. 10,9., now 
worth 450Z. : there was also a holy well here. 

At KILL UK EN, five miles east of Mullingar. An Abbey, 
built by St. Luican, whose feast falls on 27th July ; now a 
Protestant place of worship. 

At KILMACAHILT,, or KiLMiCHAEL. A Franciscan 
Friary, built by the family of Petyt ; granted to Robert 
Nangle. 

At KILTOMA, or KILTOAMEN. An Abbey, built by 
St. Nennid or Ninn, whose feast falls on 13th November. 

At LECKIN, in the barony of Corkerry. An Abbey, built 
"by St. Crumin, who died in the year 664 ; now a parish 
church. 

At LYNN, in the barony of Delvin, An Abbey, founded 
in the early ages ; but now a Protestant place of worship. 

At MULLINGAR, an ancient town. A Priory, called the 
House of God of Mullingar ; founded for Canons in the 
year 1227, by Ralph Petyt, Bishop of Meath, who died in 
the year 1229; this house, with all the possessions, were 
granted 34 Elizabeth, to Richard Tuyte ; rent 16/. 5s. 10d, 
now worth 325/. 16s. Sd. 

A Dominican Friary, founded by the family of Nu 
gent, in the year 1237 ; granted, 8 Elizabeth, to Walter 
Hope ; rent 10/., now worth 200^. 

A Fanciscan Friary, built in the year 1622, by the 

Friars ; like the lambs building amongst the wolves. 

At MULTIFERNAM. A Monastery,, built in the year 1236, 

by William Delamar, for the Franciscans ; granted, with 

the possessions, 8 Henry VIII., to Edmond Field, Patrick 

Clynch, and Phil, Petency, for a, fine of 80, worth now 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c. 

together with the rent of 4*., that is 41. of the 
present money. It appears that the Friars possessed them 
selves again of this house unti] the year 1641. 
. At RATH UG ii. A Monastery by St. Aid; now a chapel. 
At RA TIIYXE, six miles east of Mullingar. A Monas 
tery built by St. Carthag or Mochuda, where he presided 
for forty years, over eight hundred and sixty-seven Monks, 
luho supported themselves and the neighbouring poor bif 
labour. 

At TEAGHBAOITIIENT. A Monastery, built by St. Baithen; 
stood until the 13th century. 

At TEAGHTELLE. A Monastery, built by St. Cera, of 
Muskerry, but being recommended by St. Munnu to resign 
the house to St. Tellius, she did, and then returned home to 
her native country, in the year 576. 

At TIPPERT. A Monastery, built by St. Fechin, of Fore; 
now a chapel. 

At TOBER. Pope Innocent VIII. granted licence to Ed- 
mond de Lantu Laiei to build a Monastery here for Domi 
nicans; granted 31 Elizabeth to Henry Matthews. 

At TRISTERXAGII, on the banks of Lough Iron. A 
Priory, founded by Geoffry de Constantine, an English 
emigrant, about the ) r ear 1200; granted, for twenty- one 
years, to Captain William Piers, 31 Henry VIII., at the 
yearly rent of 60/., now worth 120/. 



WEXFGRD (COUNTY). 

At ACHADIIABHLA. A Monastery, founded by St. 
Finiari, of Clonard. 

At AIRDNE COEMHAIX. A Monastery, by St. Coerrran, 
brother of St. Dagan, who died in the year 639, abbot here. 

Af BALLYHACK. A Commandery, subordinate to that of 
Kilcloghan. 

At BEGERY, or LITTLE ISLAND, an Island north of 
Wexford harbour. A celebrated Monastery and a School, 
founded by St. Ibor or Ivor, who died in the year 500. 
2 B 2 



LIST OF 

At CAMROS. An Abbey, bull by St. Abban, who died 
in the year 640 ; and the abbot St. Mosacre died in the 
year 650. 

At CARNSORE. A Monastery, miilt by St. Domangort, 
of Ossory, at the foot of a high hill that overhangs the 
Irish Channel ; now a Protestant place of worship. 

At CLONEMORE, two miles south of Inniscorthy. A Mo 
nastery, built by St. Maidoc. 

At CLON MINES. An Augustine Monastery, founded by 
the family of Cavanagh, before the year 1385; granted, 
with the possessions, 35 Henry VIII., to John Parker; 
rent 2s. 6c?., now worth 2/. 10s. 

At DARIN is, an island near the town of Wexford. A 
Monastery, built by St. Nemhan, whose feast falls on 8th 
March ; St. Gobban and St. Caiman were abbots here 
before the year 540. 

At DOWN, six miles from Inniscorthy. A Monastery, 
built before the arrival of the English, and continued until 
it was granted, in 1637, to the Lord Baltimore. 

At DRUIM CHAOIN. An Abbey founded by St. Abban, 
who died in the year 650. 

At DUNBRODY, four miles south of Ross. An Abbey, 
founded through the bounty of Harvey de Monte Maurisco, 
Seneschal to the Earl of Pembroke. The Earl himself and 
his son Walter were benefactors; by an inquisition held 
37 Henry VIII., the possessions were valued at 251. 4s. 8df., 
now worth 504Z. 3s. 4c?. ; granted to Osborne Itchiugham ; 
rent 31. 10s. 6J., now worth 70J. 10s. 

At INNISCORTHY, a borough town. A Cell to the Abbey 
of St. Thomas, in Dublin ; founded and richly endowed for 
the salvation of his own and the souls of his wife, father 
and mother, by Gerald de Prendergast, about the year 1225; 
granted in the year 1581, to Edward Spenser ; rent 13/. 5s., 
now worth 265/. 

A Franciscan Friary, founded in the year 1460, by 

Donald Cavanagh; granted 37 Elizabeth, to Sir 

Henry Wallop, for a Knight s service, and rent 

10J. 16s. 4d., now worth 216/. 6s. 8c?. 

FERNS. Abbey founded on land given by Brandub king 



ABBEYS, PRIORIES, &c, 

of Leinster, to St.Moadhog, called also Aidan ; it continued 
a celebrated house until the general suppression. In 1166, 
Dermot M Meerchad, King of Leinster, burned the town, 
and in atonement to God for this sin, he founded an Augus 
tine Abbey here, and richly endowed the same; granted, 
with all the possessions, 26 Elizabeth, for 60 years, to Tho- 
inas Masterson ; rent 16/. 4c?.; now worth 320/. 6s. Sd. 

GLASSCARIG. On the sea, six miles north of Gorey. 
Griffin Cordon, Cicilia Barry, his wife, and Roboric Burke, 
her father, and three other persons, granted all their lands 
in CousinquiloSj &c., for building here a Benedictine Priory. 
Two different inquisitions, one 35 Henry VIII., and the 
other, 5 Edward VI, found this house in possession of many 
lands, and other tenements. 

HOARTOWN. Carmelite Priory, built in the 14th century 
by a Mr. Furlong ; granted to Sir John Davis and Francis 
Talbot. 

INBHERDAOILE. Monastery, built by St. Dagain, bro 
ther to St. Goemgene, who was also Bishop of Achad 
Dagain in Leinster, and died 639. 

KILCLOGHAN. Near the mouth of the Suir. Comman- 
dery built by O Moore, for the Templars, but on the suppres 
sion of this Order, it was given to the Hospitalers ; under 
went an inquisition 32 Henry VIII. ; granted, 30 Elizabeth, 
to Sir Henry Harrington, for the fourth part of a knight s 
fee, and lent 351. 16s. Sd. ; now worth 716/. 13s. 4d. 

MAG HERE NUIDHE. A noble Monastery, founded by 
St. Abban, who died in the year 650. 

Cross Friary, for the redemption of captives, was 
built on a rising ground. 

Monastery of St. Saviour, erected for the Francis 
cans, by Sir John Devereaux before the year 1300: 
granted, 30 Elizabeth, to the Earl of Ormond. The east 
end of the house is now a Protestant place of worship. 
Augustine Friary, built in the reign of Edward 
III. ; this house had some valuable possessions, though 
granted, 35 Henry VIII., to Richard Butler, at the 
yearly rent of 17 d. Irish ; now worth II. 8s. 4d. 
TINTEKN. On the Bannowbay, three miles north eastoi 



LIST OF 

Duncannon Fort. William Earl of Pembroke, having been 
in great danger on sea, made a vow to build an Abbey on 
the first spot where he should land in safety ; he put into 
this bay, and religiously redeemed his vow, by erecting a 
Cistercian Abbey for Monks, whom he brought from Tintern 
Abbey, Monmouthshire ; he endowed it with many valuable 
lands ; he died in 1219, and King John confirmed his will. 
Though this house and possessions amounted, according to 
the inquisition held 31 Henry VIII., to 751. 7s. Sd., now 
worth 1517Z. I3s.4d., they were granted to Anthony Col- 
clough, at 26/. 4s. yearly rent ; now worth 5241. 

WE x FORD. A sea-port town, and a borough. Priory of 
regular Canons. It was richly endowed by several noble 
men. There was an inquisition held on it, 31 Henry VIII., 
another 1 Edward VI., when it was granted for ever to John 
Parker, for the annual rent of 15s. d.; now worth 151. 10s.; 
but a third inquisition was held, 26 Elizabeth, when the 
house and possessions were found in the hands of Philip 
Devereux of Wexford. .This Church still remains with a 
large tower in the middle. 

Priory of Hospitalers, founded by William Mare- 

schal, Earl of Pembroke. 

Grey Friary, or Franciscan, founded in the reign of 

Henry III., granted 35 Henry VIII., to Paul Turner 

and James Devereux; rent IQd. Irish; now worth 

16s. 8d. 
Hospital of Lepers, to which Henry IV., in the year 

1408, made a grant of lands. 



WICKLOW (COUNTY). 

ARK LOW. Formerly the residence of the Kings of 
Dublin ; a town then of great note, and adorned with a mo 
nastery which Theobald Fitz Walter founded for the Domini 
cans; granted, 35 Henry VIII., to John Travers, rent 
2s. 2d.; now worth 2J. 3s. 4 d. 

BALLYKINE. Six miles and a half west of Arklow 
Abbey, founded by St. Keivin. On the site of which a Mr. 
Whaley built a house, called the Whaley Abbey. 



ABBEYS, PRIOUIES, &c. 

BALTINGLASS. A borough town, on the river Slaney. 
Cistercian Abbey, built in the year 1148, by Dermot 
M Murchad O Cavanagh, King of Leinster ; granted, 30 
Elizabeth, to Sir Henry Harrington, at 1 II. 19s. yearly rent, 
now worth 239/.; though it was worth double that sum. 

DOTARD. A church, built by St. Silvester, who came to 
Ireland with St. Palladius about the year 430 ; now a Pro 
testant place of worship. 

GLANDALOGH. Twenty-two miles from Dublin, and 
eleven north-west of Wicklow, formerly an episcopal see, 
arid a well inhabited city full of religious edifices. An Abbey 
founded and presided over for many years by St. Kelvin, 
who died 3d June, 618, at the age of 120 years. On the 
3d June, immense multitudes of pilgrims visit the seven 
churches of Glandalogh, to venerate St. Kelvin, and his 
sister, St. Molibba. The seven churches are, the Cathedral 
Church, St. Kelvin s Kitchen, Our Lady s Church, Priory 
of St. Saviour, the Ivy Church, Teampul na Skellig, the 
Rhepart. 

TRISBOYNE. Four miles east of Wicklow. An Abbey, 
by St. Baithen. 

KILGORM. An Abbey, by St. Gorman, nephew to St. 
Patrick ; now a Protestant place of worship. 

KILLAIRD. A Nunnery, built in the year 588 ; by St. 
Tamthinna. 

SRUTHAIR. An Abbey built by St. Mogoroc, brother to 
St. Canoe; it stood to the 14th century. 

WICKLOW. Capital of the county, and a borough. A 
Franciscan Friary, founded in the reign of Henry III., by the 
O Byrn,es, and theO Tooles; granted, 7 Elizabeth, to Henry 
Harrington for 21 years; rent 3^. 12s. 9<1; now worth 
72J. 1 5s. 



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